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no electricity

Posted Jul 3, '12 at 10:58pm

superbob111

superbob111

471 posts

well i hope youve hear of it
i fell bad for those people
about 1 million people are powerless
anyone live there

 

Posted Jul 3, '12 at 11:05pm

BRAAINZz

BRAAINZz

797 posts

Where is this? I heard of Santi say something, but that's it. And another question, why is the power out? Was the grid simply blown, or is there a different reason?

 

Posted Jul 3, '12 at 11:31pm

Santi_

Santi_

2,420 posts

Thunderstorm.

I think the grid was blown. It's taking more than a week to get the power back in my town.
I'm staying in a nearby hotel. Luckily it has free secure wifi.
It is hot as could ever be. I only go to my house to get some extra clothes.
At least some of my neighbors are staying here as well. Otherwise it would get quite numbing to watch the medial quality cable channels.
(Has anyone noticed, no matter how good the hotel is, they don't have sattelite?)

 

Posted Jul 3, '12 at 11:36pm

BRAAINZz

BRAAINZz

797 posts

It's taking more than a week to get the power back in my town.

Over a week. Imagine the possibilities of how bad that could actually be in today's society. Hopefully, you don't have any nuclear power plants in the immediate vicinity.

(Has anyone noticed, no matter how good the hotel is, they don't have sattelite?)


Yes, and they always have at least three channels that are just static.
 

Posted Jul 3, '12 at 11:37pm

CommanderPaladin

CommanderPaladin

1,548 posts

well i hope youve hear of it


Yes, I've definitely heard of it.

anyone live there


Yes, yes I do. :( Got fixed on my part of the grid though, after only 3 days of 100+ degree temperatures. Thing is though, other areas are far worse of, and just two or three miles down the road it's still dark.

Where is this?


From what I've gathered, Virginia, West Virginia, Washington D.C., and Maryland. Unknown if other states affected.

about 1 million people are powerless


Actually, the last number I heard was well over 2 million, with over 900,000 in VA alone. Additionally, some areas are without phone service, and an increasing number of affected zones are now losing their water supply due to pump failure and increased usage.

why is the power out?


A series of extremely violent storms, comprised mainly of derechos and some tornadoes. Derechos are storms that continuously produce powerful downdrafts with wind speeds in excess of 58 mph. In addition to their normal strength, these storms had their destructive potential supercharged by very high summer temperatures (where I live, it was 107 F when the storms hit). These high winds knocked trees over onto power lines and also splintered the electric poles themselves in some places. The storms also created a lot of property damage as well. In my community, there's a large brick church that looks as though someone dropped a bomb on it.

As the situation wears on, some people are getting power again, but the vast majority are still roasting in the dark, and the power companies are saying that it could be quite a while before everything is fixed. Crews are being brought in from all parts of the country and even Canada, but it may be as long as two weeks or more before things get fully straightened out.

[Derechos link here: http://www.spc.noaa.gov/misc/AbtDerechos/derechofacts.htm ]
 

Posted Jul 3, '12 at 11:39pm

Santi_

Santi_

2,420 posts

Over a week. Imagine the possibilities of how bad that could actually be in today's society. Hopefully, you don't have any nuclear power plants in the immediate vicinity.


Actually, we have an Areva training facility, and another nuclear plant to the east. But the backup generator, and batteries are working, so I doubt it's worth mentioning in the news.

Yes, and they always have at least three channels that are just static.


Well, not in this one. Unfortunatly the main news channel I get is FOX. *sigh* yay.

Oh, and I appreciate the concern from everyone.
 

Posted Jul 3, '12 at 11:41pm

Santi_

Santi_

2,420 posts

A series of extremely violent storms, comprised mainly of derechos and some tornadoes. Derechos are storms that continuously produce powerful downdrafts with wind speeds in excess of 58 mph. In addition to their normal strength, these storms had their destructive potential supercharged by very high summer temperatures (where I live, it was 107 F when the storms hit). These high winds knocked trees over onto power lines and also splintered the electric poles themselves in some places. The storms also created a lot of property damage as well. In my community, there's a large brick church that looks as though someone dropped a bomb on it.


And that is why so many trees have fallen in the houses nearby my community. One elderly couple died, but that was unrelated. Vascular problems, not from the heat, or the storm.
 

Posted Jul 3, '12 at 11:51pm

CommanderPaladin

CommanderPaladin

1,548 posts

Post Update

I'm staying in a nearby hotel. Luckily it has free secure wifi.


You lucky, boy. Around here, EVERYTHING went, including the hotels. And the cable. And the internet. About the only things working were the water, phone, and mail...

Imagine the possibilities of how bad that could actually be in today's society.


No imagination needed. I am by no means a "wired" individual (don't even have - or want - a cell phone), but I look around at all the people who are wired and see how they start flipping out. And even then, it's not as bad as it could be. The region I live in is still considered rural, so the level of techno-saturation is nowhere near as high as in a metropolitan center like D.C. or Richmond (both hit hard).

Hopefully, you don't have any nuclear power plants in the immediate vicinity.


Actually, not a concern. People unjustly fear nuclear power after things like the Three Mile Island incident get hyped by the media. In reality, nuclear power stations have many layers of backup and safety equipment. In a situation like this, the plant would continue to operate under its own power and distribute energy to the unaffected parts of the grid, or, if its entire service area was knocked out, it could simply lower the control rods into the reactor chamber and go dormant until needed.
 
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