Forums

ForumsWorld Events, Politics, Religion, Etc.

What do you think of the world around us?

Posted Aug 22, '12 at 11:31pm

Krill11

Krill11

99 posts

What is the difference between reading books and reading on the internet? Kids are reading far more then people in the past, they are just reading different mediums then the old ones. There is no reason for them to be different.

reading, yes. reading literature, not so much...

There are the best things that come from tech, as well as the worst...

Also, kids now a days are going crazy. We get so distracted by computer games, "Social" networks, as well as other, even more destructive, things...

~Krill11

 

Posted Aug 23, '12 at 2:01am

nichodemus

nichodemus

12,006 posts

Knight

Teens have always disliked reading. There was no golden age where people were all bookworms. All those classics we like to hark back to? Those were read by scholars and the like.  Not the average teenage population.

You claim that people dislike reading. Yet millions of books are being sold; it is estimated that a new economics book is published very three minutes. And the ebook industry is booming vastly; it seems that technology is encouraging the spread of reading since it's much more convenient now.

Technology's effects all depend on how we use it. Social networks aren't always destructive, they do trivialize relationships sometimes but they do let us get in touch with old friends, or plough through huge numbers of articles and current news. School supplies? How are they now objects of abuse? As our syllabus gets harder, it's only fair and sustainable to allow students access to tools. I've seen the primary education math papers in my country and they are a handful if you're forcing students to so brute force arithmetic.

Cameras being abused? Yes. But not everyone does it. For every example I'm this black and white dichotomy we have counterexamples by the load. Cellphones allow much faster business deals, they afford us communication, entertainment.

You're sounding more and more like a Luddite. Just saying.

 

Posted Aug 23, '12 at 2:38am

aknerd

aknerd

1,276 posts

There never were any good ol' days; they are today, they are tomorrow. It's a stupid thing we say, cursing tomorrow with sorrow.

Anyway.

Do you even realize how conceited it is to to find fault with people simply because they do not have the same literary tastes as you? There is nothing wrong with preferring modern material. As many of noted, there isn't anything wrong with preferring different reading mediums.

The thing is, classic literature, or whatever, is a niche. And as with all niches, it is foolish to expect the majority of other people to care about it. I don't complain about how people don't know anything about real analysis or differential forms or whatever. Because why would they?

 

Posted Aug 24, '12 at 7:18am

danielo

danielo

1,387 posts

there is a sentence by aristo. he said that "the youth of today is not the youth of yesterday. they read less and care much more about goofing around that about learning. all there life are go around girls, and not about studieng or practicing".
he actualy said it {not the best translation, but he said it something like 2600 years ago.

 

Posted Aug 24, '12 at 7:38am

nichodemus

nichodemus

12,006 posts

Knight

Ironically that only serves to emboss and impress upon us that the last wasn't the "halcyon days" of knowledge that some people like to claim. There have always been youths who prefer to play. And what's so wrong with that if they balance it?

 

Posted Aug 24, '12 at 8:07am

Masterforger

Masterforger

1,633 posts

i honestly think that if the lion king came out today it would be ranked as 8+ (years old of course) because people now underestimate children and their ability to understand that life isnt as shallow as the shows they watch today.

Well said. As a young kid, my entertainment consisted of my parents and the animated movies available to me. I am not saying I understood all the parts, all the intrigue the directors and animators and writers had put in, I have re-watched them and understand now, but that's not so say I would prefer something shallow. Those films taught me what the message in them was, and I have since carried that knowledge.

Anyway, one thing that can be attributed to this topic is that no, not every teen likes to read, but in the past, teens were less rebellious on a whole. There was work to be done, work which was not completed by sitting down. The old trades, such as fletchers, architects, builders, stonemasons, smiths, and weavers, all required the user to learn from a young age. The trade of sailing taught teens and young men to obey orders, and in turn be rewarded for doing so.
Now, with less things to occupy them, teens often waste their time being social, or unsocial, with the massive communication software and hardware that connects us, but also separates us.

 

Posted Aug 24, '12 at 9:48am

nichodemus

nichodemus

12,006 posts

Knight

Anyway, one thing that can be attributed to this topic is that no, not every teen likes to read, but in the past, teens were less rebellious on a whole. There was work to be done, work which was not completed by sitting down. The old trades, such as fletchers, architects, builders, stonemasons, smiths, and weavers, all required the user to learn from a young age. The trade of sailing taught teens and young men to obey orders, and in turn be rewarded for doing so.

They were not rebellious because they had to work. They were wage earners before most of us could claim our first kisses today. That didn't exactly leave many formative years for them to be ''rebellious''.

Anyway, they were a frivolous bunch back then no doubt. English universities in the 16th century already stipulated cutting the long fashionable hairstyles of students since it was regarded as morally wrong.

 

Posted Aug 24, '12 at 10:12am

314d1

314d1

3,510 posts

Well said. As a young kid, my entertainment consisted of my parents and the animated movies available to me. I am not saying I understood all the parts, all the intrigue the directors and animators and writers had put in, I have re-watched them and understand now, but that's not so say I would prefer something shallow. Those films taught me what the message in them was, and I have since carried that knowledge.

Any examples? I can't think of any movie in the past that really thought a good message for kids....

Anyway, one thing that can be attributed to this topic is that no, not every teen likes to read, but in the past, teens were less rebellious on a whole.

Since teens did not protest things they did not like (Like some kind of hipee or something) and had never been rebellious...

"The children now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for
authority, they show disrespect to their elders.... They no longer
rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents,
chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their
legs, and are tyrants over their teachers."

"The young people of today think of nothing but themselves. They have
no reverence for parents or old age. They are impatient of all
restraint. They talk as if they alone knew everything and what passes
for wisdom with us is foolishness with them. As for girls, they are
forward, immodest and unwomanly in speech, behaviour and dress."

- Either Plato, Socrates, or made up by some random person in modern times, depending on who you believe.

I see no hope for the future of our people if they are dependent on
the frivolous youth of today, for certainly all youth are reckless
beyond words.

When I was a boy, we were taught to be discrete and respectful of
elders, but the present youth are exceedingly wise and impatient of
restraint.
--- Hesiod. From the Eighth century.

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

There was work to be done, work which was not completed by sitting down. The old trades, such as fletchers, architects, builders, stonemasons, smiths, and weavers, all required the user to learn from a young age. The trade of sailing taught teens and young men to obey orders, and in turn be rewarded for doing so

So your angry that we got made child labor laws, then?

Now, with less things to occupy them, teens often waste their time being social, or unsocial, with the massive communication software and hardware that connects us, but also separates us.

How dare they! Spending time having fun with their friends. Back in my day, we had to walk to the next farm to see our friends. And it was uphill both ways, in the snow.

 

Posted Aug 24, '12 at 12:08pm

Masterforger

Masterforger

1,633 posts

So your angry that we got made child labor laws, then?

Being taught your father's/mother's craft from an early age so as you can continue the tradition is child labour to you?
How hard do you work? Do you even work at all? Have you even seen an honest hour of simple, unquestionable work, like stacking firewood or studying a book thoroughly?

 

Posted Aug 24, '12 at 12:24pm

nichodemus

nichodemus

12,006 posts

Knight

How is studying a book for an hour even work?

Think about the contexts. It's all about the circumstances; calling it child labour when you're already a full fledge adult at 15 seems parochial. Kings took power personally even younger than that; and peole dropped dead before they grasped at a fourth decade of life. It would be supremely unfair to claim that such work in the past was child labour. It's also rather foolish to jump on what Forger said and claim he is seething at child labour laws. That's an incredible leap you made, and it didn't make a modicum of sense in lambasting him.

Of course due to the caprices of the global economy and our perceptions of social structure due to longer life spans and changing social roles, this has all
changed so your my point of us having little reason to be angry at teens spending time so "frivolously" might hold water and is defensible. But it is abit tiring seeing you take an unrelated point and spin it into something insidious.

 
Reply to What do you think of the world around us?

You must be logged in to post a reply!