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[REQUESTED] Health and fitness

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Posted Jan 10, '13 at 12:11pm

GhostOfMatrix

GhostOfMatrix

15,478 posts

Knight

400 calories burnt on treadmill.

May do some core stuff later.

Yep, that's it...

 

Posted Jan 11, '13 at 12:15pm

GhostOfMatrix

GhostOfMatrix

15,478 posts

Knight

400 calories burnt on treadmill.

I made the doctor appointment and it's on the 14th. In the meantime he said to keep taking the anti-inflammatories and abstain from upper body work.

I may train legs tomorrow. I'll probably be able to squat because my elbow doesn't hurt when in that position anymore, but it'll depend on whether or not my legs are still sore.

 

Posted Jan 11, '13 at 6:03pm

spinmove

spinmove

25 posts

Ghost, it seems like half this thread is documentation of you being sick and listing your aches and pains. It is painfully obvious that you are overloading your body and "working out" way too much. Unless you want to be a professional bodybuilder (Meaning someone who body-builds for a living, goes on competitions, etc.) then you need to seriously reconsider how you train and the weights you are using. Being "healthy" is not about lifting the heaviest, you are harming your body by your excessive workouts.

 

Posted Jan 11, '13 at 6:25pm

rayoflight3

rayoflight3

440 posts

Ghost, it seems like half this thread is documentation of you being sick and listing your aches and pains. It is painfully obvious that you are overloading your body and "working out" way too much. Unless you want to be a professional bodybuilder (Meaning someone who body-builds for a living, goes on competitions, etc.) then you need to seriously reconsider how you train and the weights you are using. Being "healthy" is not about lifting the heaviest, you are harming your body by your excessive workouts.


Illness is not something one can easily control. Working with heavy weights several times a week does not make one more susceptible to disease. As for his recent injury, that could be due to a number of factors. If anything, it is not the frequency by which he is working that he should be managing and evaluating; it is his form and understanding of the process.

Though incidentally, caloric restriction, which is not sustainable if one wishes to continuously add muscle and strength, has been linked to longevity. So in a way, by partaking in this lifestyle, you could be cheating yourself out of a few more years of life. But to each his own, and weightlifting on its own is not inherently dangerous as long as one is cautious.
 

Posted Jan 11, '13 at 6:33pm

GhostOfMatrix

GhostOfMatrix

15,478 posts

Knight

I've been sick once or twice and have hurt myself once since I began lifting again, so about seven months. Besides, the doctors said that tendinitis would have eventually happened. I'd be surprised if there was a weightlifter who has never gotten tendinitis or another injury in their lifetime of lifting.

You don't *have* to be a professional bodybuilder to want to train like them. The whole purpose of "bodybuilding" is to gain muscle. Besides, that's a specific term and I don't solely do "bodybuilding".

Of course being healthy doesn't mean lifting the heaviest, however I have goals I want to achieve, and this is how I achieve them. I've also never said that being "healthy" means lifting the heaviest amount of weights, so I don't understand why you mentioned it.

First, it's not excessive. It'll depend on the individual actually performing the training sessions to determine that and the results.
Second, I've made amazing gains while training. Deadlift and squat both increased ~100 pounds in a matter of five or so months, muscle gained all over, etc.
Third, I'm not harming my body. I'm making it better. Take your average person who doesn't train at all or have a regulated diet and compare them to me. Who's more physically fit and healthier? However it's stupid to compare us because the answer is obvious.

Lastly, your arguments are silly. I don't intend insult, but you should really do research on these topics before talking about them.

 

Posted Jan 11, '13 at 7:03pm

GhostOfMatrix

GhostOfMatrix

15,478 posts

Knight

As for his recent injury, that could be due to a number of factors. If anything, it is not the frequency by which he is working that he should be managing and evaluating; it is his form and understanding of the process.

I'd consider my form "good" as I've always tried to replicate what people consider good and I'm sure that's how it comes out, so I think it was due to an exercise; skullcrushers. I remember getting slight elbow pain when I increased the weight on them while seated (maybe a month ago), so once that happened I started doing them lying (should've taken them out altogether). I didn't get any pain while doing them lying, but I've read on various BB threads and other sites that skullcrushers can cause elbow pain/tendinitis regardless.

But yes, once I start upper body training again I'll focus more on form. Attempt to make it better than before, more controlled and whatnot.

However everyone should note that weightlifting will always have a risk regardless of form and precautions, as with most things in life.
 

Posted Jan 12, '13 at 2:41am

rayoflight3

rayoflight3

440 posts

The whole purpose of "bodybuilding" is to gain muscle. Besides, that's a specific term and I don't solely do "bodybuilding".


Bodybuilding is indeed a specific term, and what you do does not technically qualify as bodybuilding anyway. The purpose of bodybuilding is not to gain muscle; it is to achieve the most aesthetic physique possible. Factors that go into aesthetics include not only muscle mass but also symmetry, leanness, and genetics. In other words, if you really had a bodybuilding regimen, you'd eventually be cutting down to a low body fat percentage (sub-10%), evaluating your physique constantly, and bulking back up.

Third, I'm not harming my body. I'm making it better. Take your average person who doesn't train at all or have a regulated diet and compare them to me. Who's more physically fit and healthier? However it's stupid to compare us because the answer is obvious.


Err...you may be more physically fit but not necessarily healthier. So for the latter at least, the answer isn't obvious at all. If you really wanted to be healthy, then you should have something like: high levels of cardiovascular exercise + proper nutrition and caloric restriction + a strong immune system (which isn't entirely controllable). Weightlifting, as an anaerobic process, does not really have a significant direct impact on your health.
 

Posted Jan 12, '13 at 9:25am

GhostOfMatrix

GhostOfMatrix

15,478 posts

Knight

So for the latter at least, the answer isn't obvious at all. If you really wanted to be healthy, then you should have something like: high levels of cardiovascular exercise + proper nutrition and caloric restriction

I'd consider my cardiovascular exercise to be moderate at best, since I only do medium speed walking for 30-40 minutes at an incline angle (five-six days a week). I also have proper nutrition and have recently introduced caloric restriction. I never closely monitored my caloric intake until about a week ago, and that's only because I'm cutting now, but I've always had a rough idea of how many calories I had a day.
Also, I mentioned the individual not training or having a regulated diet, so I think that I am healthier in comparison. But if you take a sprinter/anyone similar, they're most likely "healthier".

---

No leg training or cardio today as my legs are still sore from the last leg training session. I recently discovered that my gym is open on Sundays (1-4pm), so I'll train tomorrow.
 

Posted Jan 12, '13 at 6:06pm

GhostOfMatrix

GhostOfMatrix

15,478 posts

Knight

Apparently my wrist positioning for back squats has been wrong. Start the video at around 14 minutes for explanation. I'll fix the form tomorrow and see how it turns out.

Now to do more research on the exercises I perform.

 

Posted Jan 13, '13 at 3:35pm

GhostOfMatrix

GhostOfMatrix

15,478 posts

Knight

I feel very energetic and generally great today. Feels amazing, man.

Okay, so after doing more research, I've decided to clean up my exercises and routine. Since my gym is open on Sundays I'll be able to train more appropriately. My routine will be:
Legs
Push
Pull
Rest two days then repeat

Cardio four days in a row, rest, repeat; 30-40 minutes of moderate paced walking, burn 300-400 calories

Core training on every first rest day

Rotator cuff work after every push day and forearm work after every pull day

I wasn't going to mention that in this post, but I felt like I should document it here. The rotator cuff and forearm work will be less than ten minutes each, they're just precautions I'm taking.

---

Here's what I'll be doing for legs from now on (first leg day):
A:
Deadlifts x 5
Hex bar deadlifts x 5
Front squats x 5
Hamstring curls x 5
Standing calf raises x 3

B:
Back squats x 5
Front squats x 5
Hex bar deadlifts x 5
Hamstring curls x 5
Standing calf raises x 3

I won't be doing traditional deadlifts as often anymore, perhaps every other week or every two weeks due to it being very draining (won't be doing them at all currently because of tendinitis, I see the doctor tomorrow). I also want to focus more on my legs.

Second leg day (I did this one today):
Front squats x 5
Back squats x 5
Romanian deadlifts x 5
Hamstring curls x 5
Seated calf raises x 3

The push and pull day exercises aren't relevant at the moment, I'll mention them once I'm able to do upper body training again.

---

Front squats:
185 - 5
205 x 4 - 3

Back squats:
225 - 6
250 - 4
280 x 3 - 3

Romanian deadlifts:
185 - 5
205 - 5
225 - 5
225 x 2 - 3

Hamstring curls:
75 - 10
75 - 8
75 - 6
65 - 8
65 - 6

Seated calf raises:
90 - 12
90 x 2 - 10

300 calories burnt on treadmill.

Everything felt great today considering I haven't done squats in about two weeks. I fixed my form on back squats and it felt much better; I was able to go below parallel and felt stronger (considering I did front squats first, I expected to do less weight on back squats).

Leg press is gone because the general consensus is that it's useless for intermediates+. Romanian deadlifts also felt better in my legs, it targets the hamstrings well.

Going below parallel had to do with me fixing my form and doing more stretching daily. I've been doing a lot of lower body stretching, usually two sessions lasting fifteen minutes each.