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Issues with Islam

Posted Sep 19, '12 at 9:02pm

Holladay15

Holladay15

3,672 posts

Look we we all have 'Freedom of speech' here in the U.S that guy who made the movie has his rights and can't be penalized for it. Now of course it doesn't mean what he did wasn't going to make people mad, but that doesn't give the people of Egypt the right to go and KILL an American, BURN our FLAG and then go punish another embassy (German embassy) for something they didn't do. It was the guy who made the pilot of the film, not the people of America or Germany

 

Posted Sep 19, '12 at 10:28pm

nichodemus

nichodemus

13,239 posts

Knight

Look we we all have 'Freedom of speech' here in the U.S that guy who made the movie has his rights and can't be penalized for it.


It's crazy what people think they have the freedom to say. You're infringing on the freedom of the insulted person. So my question again, is what makes your freedom to slur him, more important than his freedom to remain unsoiled and free from such baloney?

It was the guy who made the pilot of the film, not the people of America or Germany


Then why have so many American lone wolves targeted Muslims and Arabs in America since 9/11? The recent shooting of Sikhs just because they had turbans comes to mind. Americans are no better.
 

Posted Sep 20, '12 at 2:14pm

thewolf52

thewolf52

28 posts

I think this is relevant

 

Posted Sep 20, '12 at 6:49pm

Alpha791

Alpha791

4,230 posts

It's crazy what people think they have the freedom to say. You're infringing on the freedom of the insulted person. So my question again, is what makes your freedom to slur him, more important than his freedom to remain unsoiled and free from such baloney?


That is like.. perfectly said. People these days think that freedom of speech means that "Hey! I can go **** in this guy's shoes as long as I say its in my freedom of speech!" It's so stupid. Like when people protested at a US SOLDIERS FUNERAL. They screamed and yelled about how war is wrong and held up picket signs saying how him being in the military was wrong. People...
 

Posted Sep 20, '12 at 7:57pm

partydevil

partydevil

5,119 posts

That is like.. perfectly said. People these days think that freedom of speech means that "Hey! I can go **** in this guy's shoes as long as I say its in my freedom of speech!" It's so stupid.


people should be able to say what is on their mind.

like when people protested at a US SOLDIERS FUNERAL. They screamed and yelled about how war is wrong

there are other better times to make yourself heard.
this can be seen as disturbances of public order. where probably is a law against in the usa aswell. (not sure, just a guess)

held up picket signs saying how him being in the military was wrong.

if he was in the military, i really wonder why he choose that moment. =S
1 thing is sure tho. he has changed for the bad in the military. and wont become his old self anymore.
 

Posted Sep 20, '12 at 8:21pm

Alpha791

Alpha791

4,230 posts

people should be able to say what is on their mind.


Not when it is meant only to harass and condemn other people. Especially as someones funeral. That's just plain asinine and disturbing.

there are other better times to make yourself heard.
this can be seen as disturbances of public order. where probably is a law against in the usa aswell. (not sure, just a guess)


There's next to nothing that the US government or judicial system will do when people yell out "It's my freedom of speech!" so they were protected from any legal action.

if he was in the military, i really wonder why he choose that moment. =S
1 thing is sure tho. he has changed for the bad in the military. and wont become his old self anymore.


He died in combat like many people do. The military only changes you if you want it to change you. Being in the military isn't morally wrong. War isn't morally wrong. Moral perceptions change from era to era or even generation to generation. The fanatics who protest at a man's funeral sicken me and make me sad for the future of the human race if no one will even respect the memory of a man that gave his life fighting for a cause that they are too holy for.
 

Posted Sep 20, '12 at 9:20pm

thewolf52

thewolf52

28 posts

He died in combat like many people do. The military only changes you if you want it to change you. Being in the military isn't morally wrong. War isn't morally wrong. Moral perceptions change from era to era or even generation to generation. The fanatics who protest at a man's funeral sicken me and make me sad for the future of the human race if no one will even respect the memory of a man that gave his life fighting for a cause that they are too holy for.

One man's hero, another man's terrorrist
 

Posted Sep 20, '12 at 9:25pm

nichodemus

nichodemus

13,239 posts

Knight

people should be able to say what is on their mind.


People should have the right to remain uninsulted. The person instigating conflict is the one actively stirring the hornet's net.
 

Posted Sep 21, '12 at 12:21am

Enti

Enti

9 posts

People should have the right to remain uninsulted. The person instigating conflict is the one actively stirring the hornet's net.


Does the right to remain uninsulated take presidency over your right to say what you want? I was unaware we even had a right to remain uninsulated.

Besides, "Instigating the conflict" is really, no offense, a strange way to look at it. Why is it their fault they where attacked? It would be the equivalent to blaming a **** victim for being *****, or a man for getting his wallet stolen for walking the streets at night. It isn't their fault someone committed a crime for what they said, why would you blame them for it?

It's crazy what people think they have the freedom to say. You're infringing on the freedom of the insulted person. So my question again, is what makes your freedom to slur him, more important than his freedom to remain unsoiled and free from such baloney?


Last I checked, we in America have the freedom to say whatever we want. How does saying anything infringe on the rights of the insulted person? And then again, how do you describe insulting someone? Does it include political leaders?

Then why have so many American lone wolves targeted Muslims and Arabs in America since 9/11? The recent shooting of Sikhs just because they had turbans comes to mind. Americans are no better.


So many? While the anti-Muslim violence did triple, which is in no way a good thing, it is hardly a pleuge of "American lone wolves" going around and killing random Muslims, and saying it is is, ironically, quite offensive.
 

Posted Sep 21, '12 at 3:04am

nichodemus

nichodemus

13,239 posts

Knight

Does the right to remain uninsulated take presidency over your right to say what you want? I was unaware we even had a right to remain uninsulated.


Does it not? Criticizing religion is one thing, putting it across offensively is another.

Besides, "Instigating the conflict" is really, no offense, a strange way to look at it. Why is it their fault they where attacked? It would be the equivalent to blaming a **** victim for being *****, or a man for getting his wallet stolen for walking the streets at night. It isn't their fault someone committed a crime for what they said, why would you blame them for it?


You insult someone, you prepare for the consequences. Thinking that insulting someone without getting a reaction is naive. A **** victim doesn't go out and flash herself. A man doesn't go out with a wallet begging to be robbed. But if you know you're going to instigate and inflame feelings violently when you provoke people by smearing dirt on what they believe, you deal with the consequences, because you're actively provoking them. Muslim protesters are reacting, a robber and rapist already has the intention to commit their crime.


So many? While the anti-Muslim violence did triple, which is in no way a good thing, it is hardly a pleuge of "American lone wolves" going around and killing random Muslims, and saying it is is, ironically, quite offensive.


I didn't say it was a plague. A rise is a rise, and it is a bad thing. Nor is it offensive. It's a fact that even the FBI acknowledges. Anti-Muslim hate crimes soared by an astounding 50% in 2010, skyrocketing over 2009 levels in a year marked by the vicious rhetoric of Islam-bashing politicians and activists, especially over the so-called 'Ground Zero Mosque' in New York City.
 
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