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Education Plans Will Eventually Be In Progress By 2020

Posted Nov 8, '12 at 1:19am

shock457

shock457

470 posts

Well, as you may have heard. The government will make major changes by the year 2020. This affects me because this is when I graduate from college. Education reforms are bound to happen and education will greatly improve, but I get none of this.

Now, to the main point of the topic. Do you think education needs to be reformed or the people themselves?

Honestly, I believe that education needs reforms. Look at America. We are one the top countries to be spending a vast amount of our income to education. However, we are not doing well in our scores. There are many countries who spends half of what we spend, yet their scores rivals ours.

If education is vital to our economy, why does the government focus on Health Care and Education before anything else?

Would jobs go first before education? (Sort of like the chicken and egg question.)

Please give your thoughts and opinions about this matter.

 

Posted Nov 8, '12 at 1:52am

jeol

jeol

3,565 posts

Having a job is certainly feasible without an education - that was the basis behind much of the Industrial Revolution(s). Education was proven to improve a person's intellect, respect, and honor, the best example I can think of being G. A. Harty's novel, Facing Death, but education is certainly not necessary in unrelated areas - a coal miner needs to know naught but what machinery he uses, and even experience itself can teach a lot to a man, if not education (also mentioned in Facing Death, though rather briefly compared to the main purpose of the book itself). There are, of course, jobs that require a good knowledge that cannot simply be gained by experience, for instance, education itself, or politics, any science related job, etc.

The truth is, education is expensive, and if we bother trying to educate people to the same level, most people will most likely not even remember the extent of their education, much less put it into practice. That isn't to say that that education shouldn't be available - it should be voluntary, else it is about as useless as burning money. Actually, that's essentially what it is. The education system we have now is kind of ridiculous; there are millions of people going to college, and there are quite a few who don't care at all about what education they are receiving - all they are looking for is some major so they can say they graduated knowing this thing, so they are more likely to get a job than people who don't - only, they didn't learn anything, most likely, and the message is that everyone should go to college so that they can get a job (contrary to a *better* job, with this economy), which is ultimately counter-productive: they spend money so that they most likely will learn nothing but will earn money that will most likely pay off their student debts only decades in advance, depending on how much they're actually saving.

That's actually driving the economy down, because those four years are potential to be working, earning money (rather than spending it), and instead of essentially wasting time they can actually do what they probably could have already done in the first place.

Of course, this is all assuming that you could even get a job in the first place. "Ponzi scheme," I believe they call it?

 

Posted Nov 8, '12 at 2:21am

Freakenstein

Freakenstein

8,090 posts

Moderator

Honestly, I believe that education needs reforms. Look at America. We are one the top countries to be spending a vast amount of our income to education. However, we are not doing well in our scores. There are many countries who spends half of what we spend, yet their scores rivals ours.

A good example is Finland, who consistently scores the top 5 in academia for just scraping the exams and homework economy altogether and just have a relaxing, free way of teaching students. We have recently tried to be like China in Japan in terms of scrutiny of testing, but should we point ourselves towards them or adopt Finland's policies?

Universities are private institutions with public subsidies, so of course they operate like a business. This works in conjunction with employment. Employers want people with degrees, even with jobs that don't require that in-depth of an education. Universities respond to this demand by installing "supplementary" courses along with your degree to implement "well-rounded" proficiencies, even though your career might not be exposed to this content at all. All this so more people apply to the colleges to meet the demands so colleges can net more profits and especially more with the supplemental courses.

The days of apprenticeships are going the way of the dinosaurs.

 

Posted Nov 8, '12 at 3:01am

shock457

shock457

470 posts

The truth is, education is expensive

Education expensive? Is it really expensive or are we the ones who spend too much on education?

Just think about it. America is one of the top countries in money spending for education, yet we are still horrible in our sujects. If I remember correctly, we are 14th in Science, 12th in Reading, 24th in Math. You know how horrible that is? We could be the number one country if you think about it deeply.

A good example is Finland, who consistently scores the top 5 in academia

Well, you do bring up a good point there. Finland's economy is one of the most developed in the world. Not to mention they are 2nd in both Math and Reading and used to be 1st in Science. That is outstanding.

As for their scores, students there could be more serious, unlike here. Well, everything depends on the people. If we were the top in education, our economy would be twice as better as it is now.

 

Posted Nov 8, '12 at 9:17am

Masterforger

Masterforger

1,633 posts

@Joel Right on all accounts. If all we have in the future are well-educated engineers, architects and the like, who the heck carries out all the grand plans, or gets the stuff in the first place? Generally, in education, you get out what you put in. If the teachers are good enough, but not fantastic, no matter. If you wind up without a degree, it is either because your school was terrible or you never paid good attention. But you cannot always blame the government for the fact you didn't try hard.

 

Posted Nov 8, '12 at 10:20am

fission12

fission12

63 posts

Education is the most important aspect of a developed economy; it is an investment in the next generation to make them more specialized workers and therefore be able to do more specialized jobs.  A person without education might, say, work at a fast food resturant.  Doing so takes no specific education besides an ability to speak, being able to cook basically.  A person with a specilized education will be able to do a job that others generally cannot.  For example, a person who has gone through many science-oriented courses can do a science job that many others can't do. 

Basically the whole world competes in this; after all, without education, how long will your #1 status last.  Young people are the future.  They are our future workforce, the people who will take care of us.  A good ratio that shows the importance of this is the dependency ratio.  Simply a high one, Europe and Japan, leads to problems. 

Education is important, but can it be done?

-fiss

 

Posted Nov 8, '12 at 11:55am

partydevil

partydevil

5,087 posts

i heard that the technologie etc. of todays go's to fast for schhols to keep up whit.
if someone starts a ICT study today that takes 4 year then in their 3rd year the info they got in year 1 is already outdated. and there are more examples like this.

maybe you guys are just as good at school as other countries but can people from other countries easyer adept to changes on the field.

 

Posted Nov 8, '12 at 8:04pm

jeol

jeol

3,565 posts

Education expensive? Is it really expensive or are we the ones who spend too much on education?

Well, teachers need a salary too, and it wouldn't make much sense for it to come out of the pockets of everyone (especially if they weren't as fully educated themselves) when the students are participating in the education itself. It does lighten the load of the students, but is more of a burden for the whole of society.

And in reality, yeah, knowledge is pretty valuable. It's the difference between having a high-paying job and working a non-specific-ed job. Some of those gaps are few and far between, but there can still be a difference. If someone wants to receive specific-ed, though, he should probably evaluate his skills compared to what is valuable in the market when he graduates and in the foreseeable future, not to mention if he would actually profit more greatly than just getting a general job.

i heard that the technologie etc. of todays go's to fast for schhols to keep up whit.
if someone starts a ICT study today that takes 4 year then in their 3rd year the info they got in year 1 is already outdated. and there are more examples like this.

Schools cannot teach comprehension - they can enable the facts that may lead to comprehension, but unless you actually try to understand the material you practically learn nothing. I suppose it's the teacher's responsibility to keep students up with the trend and statistics and research, and the student's both alongside (to make sure that what the teacher may say is true) and outside of education.

Education is important, but can it be done?

Not everyone wants to learn, else there'd be a lot more smart people on the planet. Indeed, there are a lot of positions in a country that could be considered to not need special education, and those should be filled by people who may want to jump into them while their peers go off to seek further education to pursue more sophisticated and perhaps higher-paying jobs. That's a sacrifice you have to decide if you're willing to take, or realize you could pay for. Most people seem to skip that last part, though...

 

Posted Nov 8, '12 at 9:07pm

ninjanick

ninjanick

71 posts

If you entered schooling this past year you would go through
1 year kindergarden
6 years grade school
3 years middle school
4 years high school
2-6 years secondary school
that would be 16 to 20 years. Can we speed up the process washington?

 

Posted Nov 9, '12 at 6:50am

partydevil

partydevil

5,087 posts

just 20 year?
here the average is 25 year and after that many people keep a study beside their job.
30/35 years in school isn't wierd around here.
maybe that is the problem. you guys want it to go to fast. learning takes time ;)

 
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