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Swearing/Cursing Unnecessary or expressive?

Posted Dec 1, '12 at 5:34pm

yourawesomeness

yourawesomeness

100 posts

i believe swearing is okay, but people still should try to avoid. there are also some cases where it is justified and it is ok. it just shouldnt be in every sentance.

 

Posted Dec 1, '12 at 8:11pm

spikeabc

spikeabc

1,004 posts

swearing is expression. pure expression. i like the freedom of being able to, even though AG doesnt allow it. there is no reason to, but there is no reason not to. so why not.

--spike machines back--

 

Posted Dec 1, '12 at 11:29pm

xeano321

xeano321

2,599 posts

Knight

I think swearing is necesarry in the form of expression when you are in pain or when something annoys you very much.

Do you necessarily have to swear when you are in pain or when something annoys you? Why not use a clean expression?

For example: *Hits finger with hammer* OW!

I'm 16 and have avoided using any swear words. Unlike most people, I don't think it's "a necessary form of expression". There are clean words to be used... Words that don't have a negative meaning.

I always just say "Good Grief!", "Oh no...", and "You have got to be kidding me!" They work great as expressions, and they aren't considered as dirty.

 

Posted Dec 2, '12 at 1:09am

rayoflight3

rayoflight3

435 posts

Do you necessarily have to swear when you are in pain or when something annoys you? Why not use a clean expression?

You're right in questioning its necessity, but it's not necessary to say anything at all. Swearing just happens to be instinctual for some when they experience an acute pain.

There are clean words to be used... Words that don't have a negative meaning.

So-called "clean words" can carry negative connotations as well. There really isn't much of a difference between dirty and clean words other than the fact that society has deemed dirty words vulgar enough to be censored. But you could easily convey the same undertones with clean words as well.

 

Posted Dec 2, '12 at 9:20am

killersup10

killersup10

1,789 posts

I'm 16 and have avoided using any swear words. Unlike most people, I don't think it's "a necessary form of expression". There are clean words to be used... Words that don't have a negative meaning.

I always just say "Good Grief!", "Oh no...", and "You have got to be kidding me!" They work great as expressions, and they aren't considered as dirt

Swearing first came to be when the Christian religion came up with the ten commandments. One of them being " thou shall not curse( something like that) Really, the world is a christian world.The world celebrates Christmas, Easter, and a few others, but people have grown so used to them that they can't realize that they are being in a part of that religion.  Where those words are considered "bad" or "negative" Killersup doesn't believe that those words are really considered "bad" or such. They are just synonyms to other words.It really all depends where Killersup is that determines which words he uses....

 

Posted Dec 2, '12 at 10:07am

xeano321

xeano321

2,599 posts

Knight

So-called "clean words" can carry negative connotations as well.

Can you elaborate a little on that? (Can you provide examples?)

 

Posted Dec 2, '12 at 11:32am

horrifichazza2000

horrifichazza2000

4 posts

Let me begin...

What is language? A group of sounds joined together to make people understand and learn. To help people enjoy life and live it to the so called 'max' so why do why do we use it explictly. Which brings me nicely on to...

What is swearing/cursing? In some cases the most unholy thing that can be comprised from a humans mouth but should you take offensive it is a sound at the same time if i put it in the context would you be offended by a sound a lot more people would say no. Although it is exactly the same thing however how did this vocabulary classed as slang originate at a guess i would say somebody needed a word to call the local village idiot. However thing of swearing in particular has a lot of strange distinct sounds. So these might have been comprised by someone experimenting on new sounds not used in languages so far. Hmmm I've confused myself......

 

Posted Dec 2, '12 at 12:55pm

Maverick4

Maverick4

3,707 posts

Scientists have shown that swearing while under great durress can help an individual cope with said situation.

Like anything, theres a time and a place for it. I think its allright if you say one every once in awhile, but its all situational really. But I ussually view people less favorably is they sling them out willy nilly just because they know them.

 

Posted Dec 2, '12 at 12:56pm

AceofSky

AceofSky

728 posts

Can you elaborate a little on that? (Can you provide examples?)

Let me jump in instead? Maybe words that have a double meaning?
Cracker. (Meant actually a cracker like the one they provide with soup)
B word. (Meant female dog)
A word. (Meant donkey)
Nazi. (Meant Germany's soldiers under Hitler. Now truly inappropriate)
Dam as in Hoover's Dam. (Add an "n" and a whole different meaning)
Q word for homosexuals. (Actually meant strange/weird)
G word to call homosexuals. (Actually meant happy)
And really other words. These words actually were meant to mean something really clean until well stuff happened.

 

Posted Dec 2, '12 at 12:59pm

rayoflight3

rayoflight3

435 posts

Can you elaborate a little on that? (Can you provide examples?)

There are better examples, but here's a simple one: "You're a fool who'll never about to anything."

By themselves, the words don't carry the same shock factor as swear words do, but the statement is undoubtedly negative. And the word "fool" has negative connotation in this context.

My point is: the only difference between an insult like that and "You're a ****" is degree. The one with the swear will tend to be stronger, but even then, you can easily come up with something more elaborate to produce a similar effect. Swear words are just succinct methods by which we express feelings that can easily be expressed through clean language. They aren't necessary, but neither are endless numbers of synonyms.

 
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