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Gantic
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Gantic
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Musical Bows

It should be of no surprise that the bow used in musical instruments is hypothesized to have derived from the hunting bow that is used to shoot arrows. It would not be surprising if this were true. Visually, they are very similar, both with fiber joining the ends of a length of flexible material. The biggest difference in this oversimplification is where the fiber joins the end of the musical bow: the frog. The introduction of the frog is as mysterious as when, perhaps, the hunting bow and the musical bow diverged. Or so one would think!

The other day I came across a first hand account, the earliest first hand account, of the creation of the frog. Sometime before the 15th century (the account was undated), an archetier's apprentice by the name of Daniel was finishing five bows his master had recently completed, as his master was away. The bows were to be sent to a local musician later that day and his master made the best of bows. Unfortunately, excitement as to the end of his apprenticeship preoccupied poor Daniel's mind and with a careless stroke, his hand slipped and snapped the end of one of his master's bow where the hair attached to the stick. There were no suitable replacements and there was no time to make a replacement it!

Frightened over the prospects of his future, as his master and the musician were influential people, Daniel scrambled to patch the broken bow, hoping the musician would find this to be a new style of bow. Hurriedly, he delivered the bows to the musician before his master returned and saw his misdeed. A few days later, the musician showed up at the work shop with the patched bow and demanded to speak to Daniel's master. With fear in his heart, Daniel called his master. To his surprise, the musician enjoyed the patched bow the most and declared that all bows he ordered be made this way. Never had Daniel achieved greater success. The frog was Dan's best mend.

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R2D21999
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R2D21999
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Ohhh another one... and it's hard again. *looking so hard*

Gantic
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It's always in the last line.

R2D21999
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Pbbbf I knew that. *looks and sees it* Ohh I know what it is but I don't wanna ruin the fun.

StormWalker
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*staring at it*
*staring at it*
*staring at it*
Nope, I don't see it.

MattEmAngel
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"It is a tribute to all nations, but mostly America."
-Sam the Eagle.

MattEmAngel
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MattEmAngel
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Sorry, the title is actually "A Salute to All Nations, But Mostly America". Same joke, different words.

Gantic
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Gantic
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Old MacDonald

Devon MacDonald was a successful pig farmer in California prior to his divorce. The pig farm was his most prized possession. Second came his motorcycle collection that he looked after in his spare time. He had been pig farming and collecting motorcycles for almost as long as he had been alive. The pig farm had belonged to his father until it was passed down to him and he had been helping his dad with the farm since he was five.

The earnings from the pig farmed fueled his motorcycle collection. The love of motorcycles first came at the age of 10, when he saw his first Harley. It wasn't until he was 15 that he first rode one, 18 that he owned one, and 30 when he had a sizable collection.

Devon was also married with two kids. Mrs. MacDonald, unfortunately, was not happy with coming not second but third to pig farming and motorcycles and filed for divorce. In the divorce settlement, Devon kept all of the pigs and all of the Harleys, proving once and for all that all hogs go to Devon.

R2D21999
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Wow I found that one pretty fast.

light_chaser
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that was cool...

and r2, its always on the last line, remember that now...

Gantic
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Weekend Fair
Each year, for some minutes to a few hours on a random weekend, several of the local tradesman associations, from carpenters to steelworkers and fishmongers to glaziers, each held their fair full of festivities in one large tradesman festival. The fairs appeared and disappeared quickly with no notice and, most likely, no permit. There were always all sorts of games relating to the professions of the groups based off of popular carnival games. Although the same games often appeared year after year, they were always slightly different, being put together the day of the respective fair.

Year after year, they managed to draw in sizable crowds with no advertisement. Over time, two makeshift games run by the cabinetmakers and the eel mongers, respectively, came to be the best of the fest and the most anticipated year round. The cabinetmakers ran their own version of skee ball, which was no different from other versions skeeball, except that it was built out of wardrobes. The eel mongers had a version of ping pong ball toss where players tossed the ball through the door of eel traps instead of the tops of fish bowls. It should be no surprise to anyone that the two most popular flash game sites were Armoire Games and Conger Gate.

R2D21999
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Yay I found it. Its... I'm not telling you. Figure it out yourself.

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