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Is it OK to teach evolution in public schools?

Posted Jan 30, '13 at 12:26am

Kasic

Kasic

5,590 posts

Is there a reason why this explanation and definition is being constantly and blatantly ignored?

I think it's the same reason as to why Creationists cite missing links, lack of evidence, spontaneous generation, the Big Bang theory, animals changing species in one generation and more as evidence against evolution. They have a basic, fundamental misunderstanding of scientific processes, don't attempt to look at the facts, and have been fed false information about the topic by those who believe similar things as they do. It's one large grouping of the ignorant and biased reaffirming each other's flawed stance and then plugging their ears and shouting when someone argues with them.

 

Posted Jan 30, '13 at 12:30am

Getoffmydangle

Getoffmydangle

148 posts

Well the parents don't want their kids to believe Evolution, since it goes against what their religion says. Also Evolution is a scientific theory. And didn't they say something about those "Missing Links"

2 things: some people clearly shouldn't be having kids, and its time to stop listening to "they"

 

Posted Jan 30, '13 at 4:50am

MageGrayWolf

MageGrayWolf

9,691 posts

Knight

And didn't they say something about those "Missing Links"

To that I ask you what "Missing Links"?

"A decade ago, Kathleen Hunt, a zoologist with the University of Washington, produced a list of a few hundred of the more dramatic transitional species known so far, all of which definitely fit every criteria required of the most restrictive definition.  Myriad transitional species have been, and still are being, discovered; so many in fact that lots of biologists and paleontologists now consider that list “innumerable” especially since the tally of definite transitionals keeps growing so fast!  Several lineages are now virtually complete, including our own.

“By the way, the missing link?  It’s still missing!”

No it isn’t.  Hasn’t been for a long time now.  There was a missing link in 1859 when there were only two species of humans yet known in the fossil record, and no intermediate fossils to link them with any of the other apes we knew of at that time.  Since then, we’ve found the fossils of thousands of individuals of dozens of hominid species, many of which provide a definite link to the other apes.  But there were two particular pieces predicted to complete the puzzle:

First, it was never supposed that we evolved from any ape species still alive today.  Instead the theory held that chimpanzees and humans were sibling species, daughters of the same mother.  So the first link we needed to find was an ancient ape apparently basal to either of us "to prove there was a potential progenitor of both groups.  We had already found that link in Europe five years before Darwin went public.  So we already had an evident “chain” of transitional species from which only one more “link” was needed.

The theory then required that another extinct hominid be found in strata chronologically between the Miocene Dryopithecus fontana and the earliest known human species, which from 1891 to 1961,  was Homo erectus.  We’ve found lots of candidates, as many as fifty species of apes which are now all extinct.  But more than that, the theory also demanded that we find one “half-way” between humans and other apes in terms of morphology.  We found exactly that too way back in 1974.  Australopithecus afarensis proved to be a fully bi-pedal ape who’s hands, feet, teeth, pelvis, skull, and other physical details were exactly what creationists challenged us to find, yet they’re still pretending we never found it.

But worse than that, we didn’t just find that one.  In 1977, three years after we discovered the no-longer-missing link in the human evolutionary lineage, Harvard paleontologist, Stephen J. Gould mentioned an “extreme rarity” of other clear transitions persistent in the fossil record ‘til that time, and his comment, -taken out of context- remains a favorite of creationist quote-miners to this day.  But in the more than 30 years since then, there has been a paleontological boon such that we now have way more transitional species in many more lineages than we ever needed or hoped for." -AronRa (The 9th foundational falsehood of Creationism)

 

Posted Mar 12, '13 at 3:43pm

P0rchm0nkey

P0rchm0nkey

5 posts

I reckon if you take God out you can do what ever you want right? After all everyone says us Christians are wrong and nuts, lmao, yeah and my uncle was a frigin monkey

 

Posted Mar 12, '13 at 4:15pm

pangtongshu

pangtongshu

8,704 posts

lmao, yeah and my uncle was a frigin monkey

I'm assuming you are either

a) A troll
or
B) Completely ignorant on the subject of evolution

 

Posted Mar 12, '13 at 6:19pm

HahiHa

HahiHa

5,079 posts

Knight

I reckon if you take God out you can do what ever you want right?

You're saying this as if christianism was the normal state and everything outside it is chaos. Actually it's somewhat the inverse; teaching evolution teaches observable facts, and christianism just throw it's beliefs in everywhere. (Note that a belief is a belief because it is not a fact, and that school should teach facts and leave beliefs to the individuals)

yeah and my uncle was a frigin monkey

Nope. He was an ape, like you and me are.

 

Posted Mar 12, '13 at 6:53pm

MageGrayWolf

MageGrayWolf

9,691 posts

Knight

 

Posted Mar 12, '13 at 8:34pm

Mickeyryn

Mickeyryn

244 posts

Hahiha said:

Nope, he was an ape, like you and me

.
Wrong, Hahiha, you are a penguin.

You are not an ape, you are a penguin.

Long answer to this whole topic: I believe that my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ and Our Father, God, created Heaven and Earth, and all people. America was founded i the believing in God, though of course other religions are excepted.
I don't think public schools should teach this... "evolution" or whatever. Public schools are funded by the government, tax dollars, and the government was founded under God.
No, don't teach this "evolution" public schools, because you are putting shame to America and they are pretty much dissing the constitution and all the "in God we trust" stuff.
Short answer: no.

 

Posted Mar 12, '13 at 9:03pm

xXxDAPRO89xXx

xXxDAPRO89xXx

4,338 posts

I say yes. It is just another part of world history. And I see no problem with us learning about it... :P

 

Posted Mar 12, '13 at 9:04pm

Kasic

Kasic

5,590 posts

I believe that my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ and Our Father, God, created Heaven and Earth, and all people

While I would prefer that you recognize there is overwhelming evidence about evolution and that there is no need to involve any supernatural powers, I would rather you believe God drives evolution than completely deny it.

America was founded i the believing in God, though of course other religions are excepted.

No it wasn't. The United States of America was founded on the idea that people have the right to self governance and that government serves the people, instead of controlling every facet of their lives.

Nothing to do with God, gods, or any sort of fairies.

Public schools are funded by the government, tax dollars, and the government was founded under God.

No it wasn't. Also, people can go to a religious establishment if they wish to learn about x god.

Public schools are funded by the government to teach students basic information they will need to know for future contributions to society and higher learning. Evolution is a cornerstone concept in modern biology and has been irrefutably proven to occur. It it literally accepted by over 99.99% of the professional scientific community as fact and proven Scientific Theory.

 
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