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Is it OK to teach evolution in public schools?

Posted Jan 3, '13 at 6:07pm

MageGrayWolf

MageGrayWolf

9,782 posts

Knight

I doubt so. University yes, but philosophy, to treat it with respect, needs to be taught well, thoroughly, almost like a main subject.


I don't, you could probably pull off a basic introductory course.

I almost took a theology class BTW, because I was interested in mythology back then and I'm still are.


My interest in mythology is one of the things that drives my interest in religion. It's like watching mythology unfold right before our eyes.

however, one cannot stop public schools from teaching proven theories of science at the expense of not only their own, but other children as well.


The problem is with religion making it a hot topic teachers will tend to shy away from the subject. We see this with climate change as well. The result is many kids are not being taught properly.

It should be taught, and proposed as proven science. However, it is up to an individual to think on whether or not it exists; this may seem silly, but after all science in its entirety is experimental with no certainties per se.


Not absolutes just means it leaves room for improvement and gives it the ability to make predictions. It doesn't mean open to opinion.

I think that if it is taught, it should be taught with a neutral view. Like teachers just saying what people who believe in evolution say about it, without saying it is right or wrong.


Belief isn't a factor and it makes no mention of right or wrong. There is no moral aspect to the theory of evolution.
 

Posted Jan 3, '13 at 6:12pm

Kasic

Kasic

5,740 posts

Like teachers just saying what people who believe in evolution say about it,


Problem is, this implies that evolution is simply something you believe or not.

It's not. It's proven fact. There area mountains of evidence supporting it. Concepts from it are used in practical applications in numerous fields. It is one of the cornerstones of biology, if not the foundation itself.

It needs to be taught as fact, because it is.
 

Posted Jan 3, '13 at 6:14pm

arkaninerenegade

arkaninerenegade

835 posts

It needs to be taught as fact, because it is.

A large portion of americans would disagree. While there are alot of athiests now a days, its not the majority. Whats wrong if it is taught and giving student the right to believe it or not?
 

Posted Jan 3, '13 at 6:15pm

Getoffmydangle

Getoffmydangle

151 posts

Whats wrong if it is taught and giving student the right to believe it or not?


Because that is what church is for. In science class you teach science, in church you teach ..... (not science)
 

Posted Jan 3, '13 at 6:17pm

Getoffmydangle

Getoffmydangle

151 posts

also

A large portion of americans would disagree.


That does not change whether or not something is true.
 

Posted Jan 3, '13 at 6:19pm

HahiHa

HahiHa

5,299 posts

Knight

A large portion of americans would disagree.

Would you start to doubt of gravity if a large portion of Americans would disagree with that theory? Evolution is observed and used every day in research and labs. What influence has any kind of belief on a biological process like this?
 

Posted Jan 3, '13 at 6:22pm

Getoffmydangle

Getoffmydangle

151 posts

Also, arkaninerenegade, whether someone is an atheist or not has nothing to do with whether or not the process of evolution occurs as an observable phenomenon... which it does.

 

Posted Jan 3, '13 at 6:23pm

arkaninerenegade

arkaninerenegade

835 posts

Because that is what church is for. In science class you teach science, in church you teach ..... (not science)

I understand that.But the way your saying it is that the school has the right to tell students what to believe. What I am saying is that teachers should teach without saying it is right or wrong. Same for religion. What kind of country is it if school say what we can and cant believe? I myself am a muslim and would not have a problem with evolution being taught, as long as the teacher didn't say it is correct. Even though i am a muslim, I say the same for religion. Example an elective class is teaching abrahimic religion, there is no need to say that they are all wrong or they are all right.
 

Posted Jan 3, '13 at 6:24pm

Kasic

Kasic

5,740 posts

A large portion of americans would disagree.


A large portion of Americans aren't very well educated in the topic.

I know that popularity does not equate fact, but when in the field of science over 99% of the people who ARE experts in the subject agree that evolution is fact, what reason is there even to say otherwise? All evidence we currently have supports it. The only argument against it are either misconceptions or simple conflicts of previously held beliefs.

Whats wrong if it is taught and giving student the right to believe it or not?


They have the right to believe it or not, but it should be taught as fact, because again, it IS fact. Not "believing" in evolution (and I put that in quotes because it's not something that requires a belief as we have mountains of evidence and have demonstrated its properties in numerous ways in different fields) is, quite frankly, ignorant. There is no legitimate reason to disregard evolution. The only reason people do so is because some old book of shepard's stories tells them that some magic guy in the sky created everything as is.

And, EVEN IF, by some ridiculous coincidence, the world DID just &quotoof" into existence 6000 years ago, that STILL doesn't invalidate what the theory of evolution states.

Long story short, there is absolutely no reason to not accept evolution as fact. Until the as-of-yet nondiscovered (if ever) piece of evidence comes up that so irrefutably contradicts the theory of evolution, not accepting it is asinine.

You have the right to believe that it's what we call gravity that keeps us on the surface of planets and not some other force.
 

Posted Jan 3, '13 at 6:31pm

Getoffmydangle

Getoffmydangle

151 posts

@arkaninerenegade
You are equating evolution with religion. This is a false comparison. One is a natural process that can be currently observed and can be seen in empirical evidence, the other is faith-based and a system of beliefs.

Nobody is assigning a good-bad label to evolution. Evolution is just the name for the composition of millions of data sets that show the process of organisms changing over time in response to their environment.
Take math for example: the teacher is not telling the student they have to believe in 2+2=4, but it Is the teachers job to make sure the kid knows 2+2=4, even if when the kid goes home, his younger brother tells him that 2+2=22.

 
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