ForumsWEPRIs it OK to teach evolution in public schools?

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shortstopkid123
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shortstopkid123
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Many parents argue about schools teaching evolution. Creationalists do not support or believe in the theory of evolution. It goes against their beliefs. They do not believe it should be taught because it apposes many peoples' beliefs. Do you think that it should be taught?

Notes:
Lets try not point out certain religions. I am saying creationalists for a reason.

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Bladerunner679
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Bladerunner679
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Yeah... We like to ignore them.
I find it funny how the tables have turned since the birth of the religion in Rome. Anyways, the Church isnt in charge of all schools. Their opinion is just another opinion, and should not cause such a fuss. They give us all bad reps :/


I'd agree with you, except for the fact that their opinion is responsible for abstinence based sex ed, oppression of homosexual rights, multiple movements to force prayer back in public schools, even more movements to remove evolution from american science classes, heavy distrust of scientists, and general prejudice towards people who aren't the same as them. christianity may hold the majority vote, but sometimes the majority is just plain wrong.

-Blade
HahiHa
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HahiHa
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Yeah... We like to ignore them.
I find it funny how the tables have turned since the birth of the religion in Rome. Anyways, the Church isnt in charge of all schools. Their opinion is just another opinion, and should not cause such a fuss. They give us all bad reps :/

Of course it would be wrong to strive for an international flame war between creationists and the rest, but the debate is important 1) to show that creationists are not harmless and do have an influence, and 2) to show how education is important and make everyone understand that evolution is not some freaky wild guess, but reality.

Oh, and it is most important to avoid dangerous inanities like this freaking crap here.
MageGrayWolf
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MageGrayWolf
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Yeah... We like to ignore them.
I find it funny how the tables have turned since the birth of the religion in Rome. Anyways, the Church isnt in charge of all schools. Their opinion is just another opinion, and should not cause such a fuss. They give us all bad reps :/


Unfortunately there are people of influence in areas where they can make major impacts in the countries education system. These people constantly try to inject their religion into the school's textbooks. That's why it matters.
MageGrayWolf
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MageGrayWolf
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Thought you guys would be interested in this talk by Eugenie Scott.
Creationism du jour

NoNameC68
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NoNameC68
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Oh, and it is most important to avoid dangerous inanities like this freaking crap here.


Everyone involved in that theme park should be arrested since they're breaking the 1st amendment. They should be stripped of their position and thrown in jail, fined, and profited from obtaining any government job.
nitin007
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nitin007
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Separation of church and state, leave your religion at the door when you get to school. The most you're supposed to find of religion at school is in the pledge of allegiance and that's just one word. In school evolution is taught as a theory (despite the fact that there is more proof to support than others such as creationism) not as a law. Students are allowed to believe whatever they want, they could completely refute this theory if they want. It is not the job of educators to tell students what they should believe in.

EmperorPalpatine
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EmperorPalpatine
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leave your religion at the door when you get to school

You can still do religious stuff in schools if you want to (as long as they aren't disruptive or harmful) on your own time, like if you want to pray before class because you didn't study. And if a student has certain needs, like kneeling towards mecca 5x/day or always wearing a hat, the school must accomodate to some degree. Mandatory activities, like requiring daily prayer, are out. Teaching religion as fact is out. Teaching about religion may be fine in cultural classes, but not science.

In school evolution is taught as a theory

And rightly so, as long as theory is properly defined to clarify that it doesn't mean "guess".

not as a law.

Here.
MageGrayWolf
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MageGrayWolf
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In school evolution is taught as a theory (despite the fact that there is more proof to support than others such as creationism) not as a law.


Evolution is both a theory and a fact. It never was and never will be a law. Theories don't become law. A law is something different entirely.

A scientific law is a statement of fact meant to describe, in concise terms, an action or set of actions. A factual and well confirmed statement like "Mercury is liquid at standard temperature and pressure" are considered to be too specific to qualify as a scientific law. Both scientific laws and scientific theories are well supported by observations and experimentation. Unlike theories, laws don't explain why an observation is the way it is. Also laws are limited to circumstances resembling those previously observed.

they could completely refute this theory if they want.


There is a difference between denying something and refuting it.
NoNameC68
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NoNameC68
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The problem with schools, both public and private, is that science teachers often teach students that a theory is an "educated guess".

Honestly, if a science teacher believes a theory is an educated guess, they should be fired on the spot.

exitpathuser
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exitpathuser
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I believe it is ok to be taught because just because one small population within the school doesn't believe/want to be taught it doesn't mean all the children in the school do. those kids that dont want it to be taught probably got it from their parents and if thats what they believe then thats their choice. and parents can teach them that at home

MageGrayWolf
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MageGrayWolf
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The problem with schools, both public and private, is that science teachers often teach students that a theory is an "educated guess".

Honestly, if a science teacher believes a theory is an educated guess, they should be fired on the spot.


Unfortunately even scientists will use the term theory in this way, which only further confuses things.

I believe it is ok to be taught because just because one small population within the school doesn't believe/want to be taught it doesn't mean all the children in the school do.


In the US among the general public the numbers aren't that small. About a third of the population does not believe in evolution, believing that we came into existence in our present from by a creator of some sort.
(This is from 2009 Pew Research.)

http://www.people-press.org/files/legacy/528-58.gif
http://www.people-press.org/files/legacy/528-60.gif
SonOfVader
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SonOfVader
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In the US among the general public the numbers aren't that small. About a third of the population does not believe in evolution, believing that we came into existence in our present from by a creator of some sort.
(This is from 2009 Pew Research.)


Interesting how, according to these stats, women are more likely to follow the literal interpretation of biblical scripture than men are; considering the abundance of verses in the bible that treat women as little more than birthing machines.
thepyro222
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thepyro222
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I've battled with this, and the only suitable way to settle it is to teach both macro-evolution (the theory that we evolved from sponges or something) and creation (the theory of a supreme being that has given us life.) Nothing more than that (well, more intellectually of course, with all of the big words and stuff.) That way, it provides both theories whilst staying as secular as possible.

IMHO, Science classes should not teach either theory. As those theories require faith to believe them to be true. They SHOULD teach, however, micro-evolution. (i.e. Darwin's birds.) Adaptation and natural selection are major components of biology, and those adaptations are actually observable in our natural world, unlike the other two.

pangtongshu
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pangtongshu
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I've battled with this, and the only suitable way to settle it is to teach both macro-evolution (the theory that we evolved from sponges or something) and creation (the theory of a supreme being that has given us life.) Nothing more than that (well, more intellectually of course, with all of the big words and stuff.) That way, it provides both theories whilst staying as secular as possible.


But they shouldn't be allowed to teach the FSM's theory of creation or Steve-ism's theory of creation?

IMHO, Science classes should not teach either theory. As those theories require faith to believe them to be true.


No...one requires faith...the other requires scientific backing, which it has. Because it has such strong scientific backing, it may thus be taught in a science class.
HahiHa
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HahiHa
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I've battled with this, and the only suitable way to settle it is to teach both macro-evolution (the theory that we evolved from sponges or something) and creation (the theory of a supreme being that has given us life.) Nothing more than that (well, more intellectually of course, with all of the big words and stuff.) That way, it provides both theories whilst staying as secular as possible.

Creation is not a theory, it is a belief. Teach theories in science classes and beliefs in religion classes. Neither one has anything to do in the other.

IMHO, Science classes should not teach either theory. As those theories require faith to believe them to be true. They SHOULD teach, however, micro-evolution. (i.e. Darwin's birds.) Adaptation and natural selection are major components of biology, and those adaptations are actually observable in our natural world, unlike the other two.

Micro- and macroevolution are both parts of evolution. You cannot take one without the other, as (assuming you do make the difference) macroevolution is based on microevolution, and microevolution doesn't make sense if it doesn't lead to macroevolution eventually. And there's no faith required in evolution, only evidence, which we have.
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