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Mini-Mystery 2. Status: Re-Opened

Posted Jan 9, '13 at 11:28pm

IAgreeWithYou

IAgreeWithYou

419 posts

Xeano, although I am pretty sure that is exactly what happened. What were the two clues. You didn't state them explicitly.

 

Posted Jan 9, '13 at 11:53pm

xeano321

xeano321

2,563 posts

Knight

Xeano, although I am pretty sure that is exactly what happened. What were the two clues. You didn't state them explicitly.

Pretty sure if you read the whole paragraph I wrote, the two clues are included in there, they just aren't completely obvious. I don't know which two clues are the ones that dissolve the suicide factor, since I stated a few which already provide sufficient doubt as to self-killing.

In short, I think I stated all possible clues to discredit suicide. The two are included in there somewhere, unless I missed something.

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 9:29am

nichodemus

nichodemus

12,069 posts

Knight

Wait, he had a wallet filled with 50 Euro notes?

Don't know. None of the books were opened, so I guess that's a clue that he doesn't speak English?

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 6:11pm

MattEmAngel

MattEmAngel

4,628 posts

Case closed.

xeano321 has provided an almost perfect answer. In fact, it is nearly identical to the solution I wrote. The only thing (it’s a tiny thing, so I’ll overlook it) is that you didn’t guess the Two Clues. The point was for you to guess the Two Clues, then wait for conformation. Instead, you wrote four clues and a near flawless record of the event.

However, you missed one very important clue! How do you know he was assassinated and not just murdered by a burglar?

Here is the official solution, with all of the clues (including a few tiny ones you guys missed, which means I'm way, way cooler than everyone. hah).

The two clues were the note and the gun.
The note proved that it was not suicide. The man was a poor immigrant from Italy. He had no family and no friends in the US, and still had nothing on him but European money. There was a magazine in the room, but it was printed in Italian. The only other books he had access to were a few novels and a Bible, but they had “never been opened”. The note was written in perfect English.

The gun proved that it was assassination. Had he been simply murdered, his watch and money would have been stolen. Plus, the gun was presumed stolen, but “the only fingerprints on it were his”. Not only that, but it was “well-polished”. It’s unlikely a man would stop to clean the exterior of a gun before shooting himself with it. The S&W in particular, when polished, retains oil perfectly. Fingerprints stick to the surface easily, and they would have been extremely easy to see. But Angel only spotted prints on the pistol’s grip and trigger. Being a revolver, there should have been a clean thumbprint on the ****ing hammer. The gun was too clean.

From the missing, and present, evidence, Angel deduced that a hitman had been contacted by the Italian Mafia to kill Giovanni. An informant leaving the country could have had information that they didn’t want leaked. The assassin was wearing gloves. He entered the room, shot Giovanni, and then wrapped the dead man’s hand around the gun so his fingerprints were planted. Knowing that he didn’t have much time, the assassin grabbed a sheet of paper and a pen from the desk and jotted down a suicide note, leaving it under Giovanni’s other hand and the pen on the desk. Angel narrowed the field even more by realizing the assassin was from America and not Italy. An Italian assassin would have known that Giovanni did not know English.

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 6:15pm

MattEmAngel

MattEmAngel

4,628 posts

Two other clues for you that I just caught:

There would have been a thumbprint on the cylinder release. He had to drop the cylinder to load it.

Also, for anyone who can't figure out how he got into a hotel with nothing but Euros, we will assume that he had stolen a credit card and used it. The assassin reposessed it. Not sure why, though. Let me know if you think of a reason.

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 11:03pm

xeano321

xeano321

2,563 posts

Knight

I solved the whole deal? Wow... Must be watching too much Dragnet.

I wasn't 100% positive about which two clues could credit assassination. I didn't consider it wasn't a burglar, since his cheap valuables were not stolen. (It didn't really occur to me, considering Euros aren't legal tender in the states, and his watch was cheap, so, yeah.)

 

Posted Jan 11, '13 at 1:12am

pangtongshu

pangtongshu

8,619 posts

The man was a poor immigrant from Italy. He had no family and no friends in the US, and still had nothing on him but European money. There was a magazine in the room, but it was printed in Italian. The only other books he had access to were a few novels and a Bible, but they had “never been opened”. The note was written in perfect English.

1) He had moved to America recently like you said...so it makes sense for him not to have opened them yet. Maybe he isn't a big reader

2) Just because he is an immigrant doesn't mean he can't learn English. I know plenty of people that have never been to the US and don't have friends or family in the US, yet they can speak English

It’s unlikely a man would stop to clean the exterior of a gun before shooting himself with it.

I'd argue this (as many of those that commit suicide don't just rush it.they take their time and prepare it..blah blah) but the following about the oil explains the gun as a clue quite well...so arguing it would just be frivolous

So yeah..big issue..the assumption that he doesn't know English..a proper detective wouldn't just assume by what he saw in the room that the victim doesn't know English. And if he did..in a court of law..he'd be screwed once the defending attorney says something along the lines of "it is completely possible that Giovanni learned English back in Italy, or even during his short time in America. All the magazine tells us is that he preferred to read in his native language"

 

Posted Jan 11, '13 at 3:02pm

MattEmAngel

MattEmAngel

4,628 posts

It seems odd that an Italian, dying in a foreign country, would make peace with God and his family in a note that they wouldn't be able to read. The probability of him choosing English to write a suicide note, of all things, instead of his native language, is extremely small. If he preferred to READ in his native language, he would have preferred to WRITE in it as well!

On top of that is the lack of evidence on the gun. You will notice I didn't mention a fingerprint on the cartridge as well. He would have left an index and a thumbprint on the empty .38 cartridge Angel found in the chamber. The only description of the cartridge was that it had been "recently fired." No prints?

 

Posted Jan 11, '13 at 6:03pm

xeano321

xeano321

2,563 posts

Knight

Hey Matt, what about the pen? Didn't they check it for fingerprints?

 

Posted Jan 12, '13 at 1:59am

pangtongshu

pangtongshu

8,619 posts

It seems odd that an Italian, dying in a foreign country, would make peace with God and his family in a note that they wouldn't be able to read. The probability of him choosing English to write a suicide note, of all things, instead of his native language, is extremely small. If he preferred to READ in his native language, he would have preferred to WRITE in it as well!

Writes not in English while in English speaking country...English speaking detectives find note...message is relayed to family

All I'm saying is...in a court of law...the note would not hold up and would be easily dismissible

 
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