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Posted Jan 9, '13 at 8:27pm

GhostOfMatrix

GhostOfMatrix

11,693 posts

Knight

Second, you say you engage in a bodybuilding style of training, but your logs indicate strength training. Almost all of your major compounds movements are in the 1-5 rep range per set.

I didn't say that I solely did bodybuilding style training, I've mentioned several times that I incorporate both. Also, the purpose of that is to preserve my strength while cutting. When I eat at maintenance I don't do strength training as often (besides deadlifts). But this hardly matters in this thread, I don't do crossfit so I don't know why you're comparing me to them.

You say it's diverse, but judging by the opening post it doesn't sound that way.

Yes, and this is fallacious thinking.

It was based on information gained through some BB threads and a few videos I saw. Don't expect me to know a lot regarding this, I don't do half an hour of research on everything I come across, then form an opinion. It should've been explained in here (thoroughly) from the beginning.

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 12:24am

pangtongshu

pangtongshu

8,676 posts

Doing Olympic lifts for insanely high amount of reps, kipping pullups, weird and extremely dangerous looking exercises (links).

When one starts..they start with relatively low weights. They focus on form until they have it flawless..then begin claiming in weights. If you begin to falter in form...you stop claiming in weights until you can handle those weights with flawless form.

The kipping pullups are weird, yes, but it goes with CrossFit wanting to have association with everyday life. If one was to need to have to do a pull-up for some reason..if they are able to..doing a kipping pullup is much easier for a person to "pop-up" above the bar

As for the dangerous exercises..I've done some reading on people that have been injured due to Crossfit..from what I read..they were all the result of bad form while doing an exercise

I don't see how jerking the weight around and using tons of body momentum is going to help you much with strength, endurance, or muscle gains.

In what exercise do you see people jerking the weight around? The closest I can think of are those that require one to "dip" under the bar

Also, when I said dangerous, I didn't mean your regular lifts. I saw people tossing the bar into the air and catching it while doing overhead press, and another where two people would throw the bar at each other and squat.

Yeah I have no clue what they are doing. Probably some impromptu "Crossfit" of their own..and a dumb one at that

Links to women lifting that much weight, please. The most impressive thing I've seen was them front squatting double-triple their body weight, nothing else has caught my eye.

I have no clue what you lift..but here are some top Crossfit women
Annie Thorisdottir
Julie Foucher
Rebecca Voigt

It should've been explained in here (thoroughly) from the beginning.

And that is my fault...but I had to rush to work and at least wanted to start the thread before leaving. Later tonight I will have more (have to get off of computer for mean-time)

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 2:18am

Graham

Graham

6,422 posts

The use of momentum in strength training lessens the strain on your muscles. In the same amount of time, free weights are more effective; this assuming you have a proper diet.

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 2:50am

rayoflight3

rayoflight3

435 posts

I didn't say that I solely did bodybuilding style training, I've mentioned several times that I incorporate both. Also, the purpose of that is to preserve my strength while cutting. When I eat at maintenance I don't do strength training as often (besides deadlifts).

But you failed to mention in this thread that you do strength training as well. And look at your logs before you started cutting (which I believe you started a few days ago, according to the thread). Most of your sets are still in that strength range.

But this hardly matters in this thread, I don't do crossfit so I don't know why you're comparing me to them.

Because you are denigrating something because you superficially watched a couple YouTube videos and looked through biased BB.com threads.

You say it's diverse, but judging by the opening post it doesn't sound that way.

wat. Read again: "They combine movements such as sprinting, rowing, jumping rope, climbing rope, flipping tires, weightlifting, carrying heavy objects, and many bodyweight exercises."

Don't let your bias mar your perception. Crossfit is very respectable for conjuring interest in fitness in average people, men and women.

The use of momentum in strength training lessens the strain on your muscles. In the same amount of time, free weights are more effective; this assuming you have a proper diet.

Momentum and the use of free weights are not mutually exclusive. You're going to have to qualify your argument. And again, Crossfit is not a protocol for strength training. It combines aspects of strength, power, hypertrophy, and endurance training. It is pretty much everything about fitness wrapped in one, which is why I say it's unfocused.

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 3:28am

pangtongshu

pangtongshu

8,676 posts

It is pretty much everything about fitness wrapped in one, which is why I say it's unfocused.

I understand how some people wouldn't be fans of the "unfocused" aspect..but that is one of the things I love about it. There is no uniformity in the workouts..it doesn't allow your body to get used to a schedule because, simply, there really is no schedule.

Later tonight I will have more (have to get off of computer for mean-time)

Yeah scratch that...I have some stuff typed out and have much more to add to it..could have finished..but then other things distracted me

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 7:52am

GhostOfMatrix

GhostOfMatrix

11,693 posts

Knight

But you failed to mention in this thread that you do strength training as well.

I wasn't aware that I needed to mention that I do strength training to someone I've told countless times. It's also mentioned on my profile and in my thread, but okay.

And look at your logs before you started cutting (which I believe you started a few days ago, according to the thread). Most of your sets are still in that strength range.

Sets of what exactly? I see it, but the only two exercises I've focused on the strength range are squats and deadlifts. That's what, two exercises out of what? The five that crossfitters aim for strength on? Before you mention overhead press, I did a mixture there before cutting. Several strength range sets, and several hypertrophy range sets, not as ideal for strength gains.

But I still don't understand why you're comparing us.

Because you are denigrating something because you superficially watched a couple YouTube videos and looked through biased BB.com threads.

That was with my first two-three posts, then you started trying to explain it. I haven't mentioned anything negative since, but you're still complaining.

So you won't complain any further: Okay, crossfit looks nice for people that want to get in general shape. The negatively was wrong, as those exercises and things I mentioned are apparently not recognized as true crossfit, or however you explained it.

wat. Read again: "They combine movements such as sprinting, rowing, jumping rope, climbing rope, flipping tires, weightlifting, carrying heavy objects, and many bodyweight exercises."

"Crossfit is a strength and conditioning workout focusing on a constantly varied, high intensity, functional movement. Workouts are typically short "20 minutes or less "and intense, demanding all-out physical exertion."

Yes, they seem to do several different exercises, but when I read the part I quoted it sounds like they're doing a short circuit of exercises mainly for endurance. I don't understand how you'll achieve maximum strength gains when you go to press or deadlift and you're exhausted and doing a bunch of other exercises quickly.

If one was to need to have to do a pull-up for some reason..if they are able to..doing a kipping pullup is much easier for a person to "pop-up" above the bar

If you need to do a pullup for any reason, being able to do a regular pullup sounds more beneficial. If you're looking for strength anyway, you're pulling your entire bodyweight a few inches up. With a kipping pullup it's pure momentum and you're not pulling much up.

@weird/dangerous exercise talk: That was covered, and apparently it's not recognized by "real" crossfit, or however Lin explained it.

@crossfit women: Lin was saying that the women of crossfit could lift more than me, it's wrong even with those links. They're about 100-200 pounds behind on both squat and deadlifts, I don't perform the other lifts mentioned. However comparing crossfitters to me is silly, and comparing men weightlifters to women weightlifters is even more silly.
HOWEVER, I will say that those numbers are VERY impressive. They weigh in at 120-150, and are lifting near double, double, and triple their body weight on those exercises.

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 10:25am

rayoflight3

rayoflight3

435 posts

Sets of what exactly?

Check your presses and rows again. A great deal of your sets are in that range, and the ones that aren't are still within that so-called "functional strength" range (6-8 reps).

I don't understand how you'll achieve maximum strength gains

They're not powerlifters (a misnomer, by the way). You say you don't understand why I'm comparing you, but this is why. You're putting yourself (or others) against them. They train differently, plain and simple.

HOWEVER, I will say that those numbers are VERY impressive. They weigh in at 120-150, and are lifting near double, double, and triple their body weight on those exercises.

Perhaps an exaggeration on my part, but yes, those lifts are still impressive, especially since they aren't powerlifters/Olympic weightlifters.

But I suggest you stop posting. Your reputation as the so-called fitness expert here will mislead people.

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 12:28pm

GhostOfMatrix

GhostOfMatrix

11,693 posts

Knight

You're putting yourself against them.

What? As I previously mentioned, the first few posts are negative, but since crossfit has been explained I haven't put myself against them. I wasn't even the first to mention my lifts against them, in your first response post you decided to claim that the women could lift near if not more than me. Without proof I might add, but I haven't been trying to compare myself to them. I explained that what you said was wrong and left it at that.

They train differently, plain and simple.

Yes, but I'm trying to understand why they train that way. The opening post mentions that it's strength and "conditioning" work done in 20 minutes or less. It seems like there are better ways to achieve strength and athletic performance goals.

As I don't know much about crossfit, how often do they train like that? How do they incorporate an exercise such as the deadlift (along with others) in just 20 minutes? I'm interested is all.

But I suggest you stop posting. Your reputation as the so-called fitness expert here will mislead people.

First, no.
Second, I'm not telling people here what to do, just expressing what I thought/think and trying to learn more about this.
Also, I've never claimed to be an "expert", but if people here see me that way, that's not my problem. Common sense should be used, if you get advice from someone on a topic such as fitness and are interested, you should do research. Not everything a single person does will work for everyone else.

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 12:59pm

rayoflight3

rayoflight3

435 posts

Yes, but I'm trying to understand why they train that way. The opening post mentions that it's strength and "conditioning" work done in 20 minutes or less. It seems like there are better ways to achieve strength and athletic performance goals.

I keep saying this: it's not a strength-focused regimen. Get that through your head. It says strength and conditioning (and a lot of other things, too). If they wanted to be strong, they can be powerlifters. But you're not going to see a powerlifter with the conditioning of a distance runner. Crossfit simply combines all those aspects to create a consummate, albeit diffuse, program.

And I would argue that Crossfit is a solid program for developing well-rounded athletes. No, it is not sports-specific, so doing Crossfit over a football-focused workout isn't going to give you the same performance results on the field. But for overall performance (power, strength, endurance, stability, etc.), it works well. After all, Crossfit is not for athletes looking to go pro; it's for the layman looking to get in shape.

Second, I'm not telling people here what to do, just expressing what I thought/think and trying to learn more about this.

If you're actually interested, take the time to learn instead of making assumptions. Crossfit has an enormous community from which you can derive information.

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 1:00pm

rayoflight3

rayoflight3

435 posts

If they wanted to be strong, they can be powerlifters.

Sorry. If they wanted to be as strong as possible, I meant.

 
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