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Crossfit

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 6:04pm

DancesWithFoxes

DancesWithFoxes

58 posts

Crossfit and it's safety

Crossfit..when done properly..should be relatively safe. As pang stated earlier..there is usually a large focus on getting one's technique and mechanics down before beginning to move them up on weights, as to assure that they will keep the proper form. As one moves up on weights..when they start to falter..it is best to let them stay on that weight until they can do the movement without faltering..then letting them continue.

In Crossfit...the type of training you receive will be from the type of trainer you have. Some like to start new people off with a few weeks of simple mechanics training..other have more "give them lighter weights, throw 'em in the workouts, and as they go teach them proper mechanics" (these trainers usually are used to those that have already reached the level of continuous high-intensity). My recommendation is to keep yourself focused on mechanics..make sure you learn the mechanics and can get to a point where you can perform them without even having to think your way through it..from there..being to climb in weights.

Reminder: Form is important. Many people have been injured due to poor form, many-a-snatches have been lost due to poor footing, and many times people will over-exert themselves by trying to "ego-rep" (which is to let your ego get a-hold of you during a rep, causing you to lose focus on your mechanics and try all in your power just to get through the movement)

Basic Crossfit movements

There are nine basic movements in crossfit: the air squat, front squat, overhead squat, shoulder press, push press, push jerk, deadlift, sumo deadlift high pull, and medicine ball clean.

How to perform an air squat correctly:

When some people go into a squat formation they bend at the knees first. That is one of the ways to injure your knees. What you want to do is: stand with feet shoulder width apart (feet facing out at a 30 degree angle while keeping a good lumbar curve), bend at the hips into a squat form, keep your knees out (your knees should be pointing the same direction as your feet going all the way down), keep all your weight sitting on your heels, you should always aim to squat to just below parallel (meaning your hip joint needs to come just below your knee), and most of the power that comes from your squat is from opening the hips (as you go to stand back up drive your hips in an upward motion).

More descriptions on how to perform these movements coming soon. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions. :)

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 10:25pm

Salvidian

Salvidian

3,950 posts

*pang posts thread*

*Matrix and RayOfLight, AG's duo team of fitness buffs, begin debate*

Anyway, I used to Crossfit until I realized how little it helped me. It's only for certain people, keep that in mind.

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 10:52pm

DancesWithFoxes

DancesWithFoxes

58 posts

Well how long did you do crossfit? If you've only done it for a few months of course you're not going to get results. Crossfit is made for anybody and everybody. Keep that in mind you just have to stick with it and eat right.

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 11:37pm

pangtongshu

pangtongshu

8,629 posts

*Matrix and RayOfLight, AG's duo team of fitness buffs, begin debate*

Yeah..wasn't expecting that haha

Anyway, I used to Crossfit until I realized how little it helped me. It's only for certain people, keep that in mind.

For DWF and I...one thing our trainers (husband and wife that train as a duo) tell us is that "if you are going into Crossfit looking for immediate results, you will be disappointed." Most people go into Crossfit and have a mindset that in a few weeks or a couple of months they will become "buff" or "ripped". The people that do become so from CrossFit are those that have been with it for a relatively long time

Because of Crossfits wide variety of focus..the change isn't as noticeable like it would be for, say, a cross-country runner or bodybuilder..due to the fact that you aren't working the same muscles in a row each time you workout.

If you need to do a pullup for any reason, being able to do a regular pullup sounds more beneficial.

But if you need to do a pullup for any reason..being able to do a kipping pullup (which we do work-on..we do not ignore regular pull-ups. In fact, if someone wants to do a normal pull-up during a work-out instead of a kipping pull-up..they are more than welcome to. But with kipping it is very helpful, especially when tired. Also..kipping is not a swing, you are using your core to give your body momentum, then using your legs and core to give your body a little "push" before finishing the pull-up with your arms) would be a lot more efficient in the goal (as in..getting your chin/head above the bard) and keeping a constant movement

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 11:46pm

Salvidian

Salvidian

3,950 posts

I started crossfit when I was in 8th grade and stopped his fall. I did it for about 3 years. 8th grade to 11th, daily, and noticed very little improvement.

 

Posted Jan 10, '13 at 11:57pm

pangtongshu

pangtongshu

8,629 posts

I started crossfit when I was in 8th grade and stopped his fall. I did it for about 3 years. 8th grade to 11th, daily, and noticed very little improvement.

What was your eating habits like? Did you use proper form and technique? Were you at a high level of intensity when doing the WOD's? How often did you workout?

 

Posted Jan 11, '13 at 7:50am

Salvidian

Salvidian

3,950 posts

Quoting is murder on this thing.

I have a diet that follows the pyrimad.

My spotter has been corssfitting for years and taught me proper technique.

Yes.

Daily.

 

Posted Jan 11, '13 at 7:52am

Salvidian

Salvidian

3,950 posts

Pyrimad*
Crossfitting*
Auto-incorrect*

 

Posted Jan 11, '13 at 8:17am

GhostOfMatrix

GhostOfMatrix

11,693 posts

Knight

RayOfLight

Lin*. RayOfLight is different.

Found this guy some months ago, is that crossfit? His training sessions are mostly under 20 minutes and they seem to have high intensity, plus the other things described in the opening post.

But with kipping it is very helpful, especially when tired. Also..kipping is not a swing, you are using your core to give your body momentum, then using your legs and core to give your body a little "push" before finishing the pull-up with your arms) would be a lot more efficient in the goal (as in..getting your chin/head above the bard) and keeping a constant movement

This looks like swinging to me. He's throwing his legs behind him, in front, then pulling up, thus making the movement very easy. And from the videos on kipping pullups I've seen, they do the movement rather quickly. I just don't see the purpose of doing these over traditional pull/chin ups. I can't see the benefit.

 

Posted Jan 11, '13 at 11:43am

rayoflight3

rayoflight3

435 posts

Lin*. RayOfLight is different.

rayoflight3*. No more asinine libel from you.

Found this guy some months ago, is that crossfit? His training sessions are mostly under 20 minutes and they seem to have high intensity, plus the other things described in the opening post.

I don't think that's Crossfit, but he has a training mentality that is not unlike that of Crossfit.

This looks like swinging to me. He's throwing his legs behind him, in front, then pulling up, thus making the movement very easy. And from the videos on kipping pullups I've seen, they do the movement rather quickly. I just don't see the purpose of doing these over traditional pull/chin ups. I can't see the benefit.

It makes the pullup a full body explosive movement. I think there are more effective ways to get the intended effects, but the exercise is by no means purposeless. I see a lot of gymnasts do similar movements.

 
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