ForumsWorld Events, Politics, Religion, Etc.Will Christianity Die Out?

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zeus999
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zeus999
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So I was thinking a few day ago about all the religions that died out because they worshiped the sun, and I'm curious if you think Christianity will do the same due to its outdated beliefs (well to be exact Jesus is the sun, and Christianity also has roots in astronomy but whatever).

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zeus999
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zeus999
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whoops didn't finish my thought I have a cast on, and it pressed the enter button.

I believe that Christianity will eventually die and shrink and maybe another religion will kinda take its place (or less likely that Christianity will adapt to survive advances in science).

HahiHa
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HahiHa
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Eventually, yes. Civilizations come and go, religions aren't much different. Of course the abrahamic religions (I feel it makes more sense to talk of them as a group in that aspect) will try to adapt as much as possible, and survive some time more, but at some point even rubber starts tearing from too big of a strain.

I would hope that we're thriving towards a complete secularism, but I fear that old religions will just be replaced by new religious beliefs over time. The advances we're making in science are dependent of our society, it is probable that it will get lost at some point, even if we survived for so long.

Avorne
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Avorne
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Religions come and religions go, I see no reason to believe that Christianity won't be the same, though I suppose in this age of information where one can find copies of the Bible and the like easily online there's always a chance that even if it fades to obscurity there'll still be some adherents hanging on.

samiel
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samiel
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there's always a chance that even if it fades to obscurity there'll still be some adherents hanging on.

My entire thought was already here thanks Avorne
TheGenovesan
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TheGenovesan
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I'd have to agree with the previous statements. Christianity will probably die out eventually as it becomes less relevant in todays society. In these more modern times more people are moving towards atheism, although chrstianity and religions similar to it still hold some sway. I'm not sure religions as a whole will die out completely, including christianity, as there will always be people out there who will believe in religions, but I could see the majority of christians moving to atheism or another religion over a long period of time, with a couple of people still clinging on to it.

nichodemus
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nichodemus
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I don't think it'll die out per se as other religions did. When we view all the major ancient religions that we unceremoniously dump under the vague title of "Paganism", most died out due to political upheaval, e.g Invasions, population declines and the like. These aren't very plausible today, given the change in warfare and state relations, and the very global nature of religion. Zoroasterism for instance largely went on the decline after the Muslim conquest of the ME; due to the limited range of influence confined to Iran, it died out. Christianity today on the other hand is free of such disabilities.

partydevil
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partydevil
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due to the information highway i.e. internet. people will educate themself more then ever befor. + scientific proof that contradict (current) religions believes. = i think religions whit any form of god or afterlife/spirits will eventually die out. my guess is that in 300 year or so the biggest religions of today. will be as big as voodoo is today.

GhostOfMetal
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due to the information highway i.e. internet. people will educate themself more then ever befor. + scientific proof that contradict (current) religions believes. = i think religions whit any form of god or afterlife/spirits will eventually die out. my guess is that in 300 year or so the biggest religions of today. will be as big as voodoo is today.


There are some aspects of science that do confirm religious beliefs. For example, there was a a group of scientists (I can't remember the exact names or year but I know it was between 1997-205) who were using the carbon dating to analyse the age of the Earth. they found a strange anomaly, there was an entire day "missing" i.e. they did something special (way beyond my intelligence level) to discover that there was an elongated period of the exposed sunlight on the area they were in (somewhere in the North-Eastern hemisphere) several thousand years ago.. One of them was a Christian. He remembered reading a passage in the Bible where God made the sun stop in the sky (the world stop spinning) for an entire day. The scientist looked up the passage again (Joshua 10:13) and asked the other members of the team to compare the day in which the sun stopped with the Time of Joshua and the days matched perfectly.
This is only one example and I know only few of the many I am sure to exist. I, as a Christian, do believe that science does not disprove my religious beliefs, but rather confirms them. Granted, there are times they contradict, but I believe they generally go hand in hand. I do not think there will be a time of religiouslessness. If the world does grow to lack religion, I would think it is due to the great many, in ignorance, listening to the few who gather knowledge.
Kasic
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Kasic
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For example, there was a a group of scientists (I can't remember the exact names or year but I know it was between 1997-205) who were using the carbon dating to analyse the age of the Earth. they found a strange anomaly, there was an entire day "missing" i.e. they did something special (way beyond my intelligence level) to discover that there was an elongated period of the exposed sunlight on the area they were in (somewhere in the North-Eastern hemisphere) several thousand years ago..


1) Link it.
2) That's not how carbon dating works.
3) Carbon dating is not used for that old of things.
4) Sounds pretty bunk.

I, as a Christian, do believe that science does not disprove my religious beliefs, but rather confirms them. Granted, there are times they contradict, but I believe they generally go hand in hand.


"I'm right when I'm right and when I'm wrong I'm still right."
That's your mindset.

When religion is reaffirmed by science, that's only because of the sheer number of claims the multitudes of religions make. It's a statistical artifact that random beliefs of people thousands of years ago are (somewhat) correct sometimes. Then for things like history, those are simply events recorded and embellished.

As my mythology teacher loved to say, "Just because something isn't true doesn't mean it didn't happen." Stories spring from actual events and imaginations.

Was there a witch in a forest who lived in a candy house who cooked children in her oven? No. Was there, at some point and some place, a crazy person who killed children and lived somewhere? Yes.

It all depends on how far one is willing to extend their claims. A perfect example is Noah's Ark. Many accept that it was likely a local flood, even if they stick to the dimensions and time frame listed in the bible. Whereas others will not hedge and claim water covered the entire world for forty days and nights of constant rain, then it all went poof.
ihsahn
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ihsahn
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There are some aspects of science that do confirm religious beliefs. For example, there was a a group of scientists (I can't remember the exact names or year but I know it was between 1997-205) who were using the carbon dating to analyse the age of the Earth. they found a strange anomaly, there was an entire day "missing" i.e. they did something special (way beyond my intelligence level) to discover that there was an elongated period of the exposed sunlight on the area they were in (somewhere in the North-Eastern hemisphere) several thousand years ago.. One of them was a Christian. He remembered reading a passage in the Bible where God made the sun stop in the sky (the world stop spinning) for an entire day. The scientist looked up the passage again (Joshua 10:13) and asked the other members of the team to compare the day in which the sun stopped with the Time of Joshua and the days matched perfectly.

This is such complete anecdotal BS. Stop spreading vague misinformation.

Is Christianity gonna die out? As we know it, probably. It will either give way to a religion that better fits the values of a future society OR evolve into a form that is utterly unrecognizable to us, to fit those same values.
It's no secret that religion is shaped by the ethics and needs of man, not the other way around, and those are constantly changing.

But that's not gonna happen for a long time.

An age of pure reason, utterly devoid of superstition and fallacy? Very unlikely. It is in the nature of man to want to believe in a higher power, to humanize the cold, unthinking processes of nature. The thought of living in a universe that doesn't care or have a "ultimate purpose" doesn't sit well with many people.

Some of us would rather delude ourselves into thinking science fits our beliefs or reinterpreting the same religious texts over and over so that they better fit our everchanging morality. Or do you really think they thought the whole "stoning gays" part of the Bible was haha silly disregard that back in the Middle Ages?
GhostOfMetal
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GhostOfMetal
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"I'm right when I'm right and when I'm wrong I'm still right."


I'm rarely right about things. I'm just relaying what I have learned. as for linking my post to a source, it was not I who initially came across this information, it was another. That is why I can't remember much. I know it sounds fake, but the guy I was talking to swore by it. I was skeptical of its validity also but then found it in a search years ago.
I apologize if I sound misleading or empty minded. I am just adding what I think about the subject. This thread is mostly speculation, is it not?
GhostOfMetal
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GhostOfMetal
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I have just located this which talks about the "extended day" I am referring to and how it matches with legends and stories of other beliefs with a break down in it. As expected however, it is also largely speculation.

HahiHa
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HahiHa
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Even if the speculations about that special day should be correct, the only thing it shows is that people back then were witness of some kind of event and explained it with the "knowledge" they had at hand then. Nothing supernatural. As such, science can support certain events, but not the myths made around it. It does not support the religious beliefs of christianism or any other religion.

On topic, surely the internet helps keeping up the information, but again keep in mind that the information is dependent on the internet and the internet is dependent of our society.

partydevil
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that extra day could be explained by the darkles nights above the pole circles. or something like that.

anyway if it is true then that doesn't make the religion true.
for example the Egypt plagues have also happened for real. and there is proof for that.
but science and religion sure are not going hand-in-hand. the whole base in way of thinking is different.

and there is waaaayyy more that contradicts religion then it agree's whit.
and if it agree's whit religion it's because of other reasons then the reasons religion gives. it will never be a scientific fact because the bible say's so. that's impossible.

MageGrayWolf
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I have just located this which talks about the "extended day" I am referring to and how it matches with legends and stories of other beliefs with a break down in it. As expected however, it is also largely speculation.


No there isn't a missing day and creationist sites will flat out lie to you. Not to mention distort and cherry pick actual data.

As for the topic I would say yes Christianity could eventually die out completely. I would even go as far to say that it has already begun it's decent to die out in it's current structured organized form, leaving it to eventually become a more private matter. Maybe in the next 100-200 years. I could mostly see it becoming very fringe. Something along the lines of believing the Earth is flat.

I can see a different religion ending up being mainstream. Perhaps Buddhism or something similar to it. It might function primarily as a philosophy, creating an environment where the religious aspect can thrive.
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