Forums

ForumsThe Tavern

Maturity and Age

Posted Mar 6, '13 at 6:02pm

blk2860

blk2860

4,401 posts

Personally, I don't understand why people think that maturity equals age. I think people should take a "maturity test" when they're 10 and again when they're 18. The test would give you hypothetical situations, and you would have to say what you would do in the situation. The second part would consist of something similar to an IQ test. If you pass it when you're 10, you get the rights (and responsibilities.) of a 13 year old. If you fail, then you have to wait until you're 13 to take it again, and if you don't pass it then, you don't get your teenage rights. You'll have to keep taking it until you pass. When you turn 18, if you pass it you'll have the rights and responsibilities of an adult. If you fail, you keep taking it until you pass. What are your opinions on this? Personally I believe it will get rid of (most of) the trolls online. If this belongs in WEPR, please move it there. Once again, tell me your opinions on this, and what you think of it.

 

Posted Mar 6, '13 at 6:12pm

Kasic

Kasic

5,591 posts

I think people should take a "maturity test" when they're 10 and again when they're 18.

Who's going to administer it? Who's going to enforce the results?

The second part would consist of something similar to an IQ test. If you pass it when you're 10, you get the rights (and responsibilities.) of a 13 year old.

Those would be . . . what, exactly? Playing/watching T rated media? Like anyone pays attention to that.

When you turn 18, if you pass it you'll have the rights and responsibilities of an adult. If you fail, you keep taking it until you pass.

Same as before, who's going to administer the test/grade it/enforce it? Further, lots of retakes makes it pointless, because trial and error is eventually going to wear out.

Maturity isn't something you can measure from a written response. It's all inclusive of how a person views the world, how they act, what they respond like in actual situations to different emotions, and more.

Anyone can say anything on paper.

Personally I believe it will get rid of (most of) the trolls online

Exactly how would it do that?

Once again, tell me your opinions on this, and what you think of it.

It wouldn't work. It wouldn't gauge maturity. It would only add another bureaucratic rung to the ladder for no good reason and would take resources and time. Not even going into how one decides if another is "mature enough" to be considered an adult.

 

Posted Mar 6, '13 at 6:58pm

blk2860

blk2860

4,401 posts

Those would be . . . what, exactly? Playing/watching T rated media? Like anyone pays attention to that.

You know, being able to legally use sites like these, ones with under 13 laws.

Exactly how would it do that?

Most trolls are immature.

Maturity isn't something you can measure from a written response. It's all inclusive of how a person views the world, how they act, what they respond like in actual situations to different emotions, and more.

Anyone can say anything on paper.

I never said written response, here's what's gonna happen (below)

Who's going to administer it? Who's going to enforce the results?

Like I said, this is what will happen:

You head to a room in a school (if 10) or courthouse (if 18). You sit down in a chair in an all white room, and the person who gives the test sit's down across from, and is working for the government. They give you the hypothetical situations orally, asking what you would do, and you are recorded, as well as being in a lie detector chair, only instead of shocking you, it makes a buzzing noise and the agent asks the question again. Then they also give the second part orally, and the same thing happens. Except it's not scenarios for the second part.

 

Posted Mar 6, '13 at 7:02pm

ironblade41

ironblade41

523 posts

Maturity does not equal age. It doesn't even come with age. It comes with experience. If you really want to be mature, experience a lot of stuff.

 

Posted Mar 6, '13 at 7:04pm

blk2860

blk2860

4,401 posts

I know that, but COPPA and others don't seem to think so, you should've read my entire post.

 

Posted Mar 6, '13 at 7:34pm

Graham

Graham

6,422 posts

The notion of constraining Internet access via an arbitrary test is ludicrous.

Trolls are what make the Internet interesting, and if someone cannot handle that then it is their own fault. Don't impose ice cream restrictions because you're lactose intolerant.

 

Posted Mar 6, '13 at 7:43pm

Xzeno

Xzeno

2,082 posts

Maturity and age are strongly correlated. They aren't the same. Maturity is a result of life experience, or introspection, or both, paired with neurological development. While maturity and age are discrete, they're deeply linked because age informs the neurological development that defines maturity.

 

Posted Mar 6, '13 at 8:17pm

Terry_Logic

Terry_Logic

4,219 posts

the person who gives the test sit's down across from, and is working for the government.

So it's up to the government now to determine who is and who isn't "mature enough" to handle the internet based on how you answer a small series of specific questions? Seems legit.... if we all lived in North Korea.

What makes you think a person who can solve real-life scenarios is going to as mature on the internet as they will be in real life? Look at people on the road. Every bad driver you see out there has passed a DMV driving exam, but yet they continue to drive like idiots. Who is to say the same thing won't happen if a similar test is given to people to determine whether or not they are "fit" to use the internet?

Which brings me to ask this: what makes you think that someone who can exercise internet maturity is mature enough to handle any hypothetical real-life situation? You see political leaders struggle with this all the time. Are they going to be banned from the internet too?

 

Posted Mar 6, '13 at 8:34pm

Strop

Strop

10,824 posts

Moderator

Maturity is a funny thing because except in special cases, it's not something that you can appreciate until you get older :P

Maturity is a result of life experience, or introspection, or both, paired with neurological development

Specifically, topical focus is on frontal development, because frontal lobe allegedly defines executive (social inhibition) function (look up the landmark case of Phineas Gage which preceded all this by a few centuries). Maturity, from a neurological perspective, could be defined as consequence processing as an limiting step to decision making, which is what, as far as I understand, minors lack, but moreso, people generally haven't developed until at least the age of 24.

This said, the principles of the pitfalls of maturity "tests" is that decision making is a contextual process, and any systematised prescriptive test has limited ability to capture this. Scenarios only work as very loose litmus tests of outright disability (like the "your house is on fire" scenario I ask geriatric patients all the time in hospital, and at least half of them would have been burnt to a crisp if they were left to their own devices, which is good enough an indication to say they really shouldn't be if you cared at all about their safety).

Personally I believe it will get rid of (most of) the trolls online

Anecdotally speaking, I don't believe "troll behaviour" correlates with lack of maturity, especially not in any measurable sense. In fact, an "online maturity test" would probably weed out the poorly literate, but would spur on the most wily of the troublemakers to stick more spokes in the system, which of course, they would know how to work within.

 

Posted Mar 8, '13 at 9:18pm

nichodemus

nichodemus

12,166 posts

Knight

Personally, I don't understand why people think that maturity equals age. I think people should take a "maturity test" when they're 10 and again when they're 18. The test would give you hypothetical situations, and you would have to say what you would do in the situation.

Because as others have mentioned, but in far simpler terms, good judgement, comes from experience, and much of that derives from bad judgement. Which takes time to transpire, seep in, and hit your young mind. Age does bring with it maturity. Most of the time.

The second part would consist of something similar to an IQ test. If you pass it when you're 10, you get the rights (and responsibilities.) of a 13 year old. If you fail, then you have to wait until you're 13 to take it again, and if you don't pass it then, you don't get your teenage rights.

What in God's name are ''teenage rights"? They don't exist. They're up to your parents to define for you. Furthermore, if we go by your line of argument, that is, picking fault with the magical and completely arbitrary number of 18 to shed minorhood, why pick 13 as well? Seems very much a capricious and whimsical number choice too doesn't it? What's so special about it?

You'll have to keep taking it until you pass. When you turn 18, if you pass it you'll have the rights and responsibilities of an adult. If you fail, you keep taking it until you pass. What are your opinions on this? Personally I believe it will get rid of (most of) the trolls online. If this belongs in WEPR, please move it there. Once again, tell me your opinions on this, and what you think of it.

I disagree. This would make the legal system incredibly difficult to manage, given the various disparities in terms of children achieving social adulthood, despite already attaining biological adulthood. Furthermore, given that it is a test, there will always be ways and means around it, i.e studying, which completely defeats the purpose of said test, toppling the house of cards that was the whole onerous idea in the first place. On the other end of the spectrum, what about people who just can't pass the test? Will they be minors forever? If you're going to suggest a maximum age whereby everyone just automatically gets bumped up to adulthood, then the test seems moot and redundant as well.

Legal adulthood keeps changing, and for now, 18 is the number in fashion for various reasons. It is as you said, a totally arbitrary distinction made for economic reasons. One reason is that, in most western countries, primary/secondary education is complete by the time someone reaches the age of 18, and thus are considered a member of the workforce. Secondly, the de jure standard seems to be a tradeoff between giving young persons responsibilities and rights and protecting the rest of society from the exercising of those rights.

as well as being in a lie detector chair, only instead of shocking you, it makes a buzzing noise and the agent asks the question again.

Last point, you do know that lie detector tests are notoriously noted to be incredibly skewed?

 
Reply to Maturity and Age

You must be logged in to post a reply!