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Holidays changed for the money

Posted Jul 5, '13 at 9:39am

KnightDeclan

KnightDeclan

487 posts

So many holidays (Holy Days) were created with Catholic intentions, but were distorted by modern day society to have no religious meaning, and only used to make money.  Christmas, Christ's birth, is the biggest money-making holiday around now.  Charlie Brown's Christmas was the last Christmas Special with any religious meaning in it.  Halloween, the eve of all saints, had been turned into monsters and candy only.  Easter, Christ's rising from the dead, somehow only marks the beginning of spring, involving eggs, candy, and bunnies.  "St." Valentines day, somehow became a day of love, even though it's honoring a saint.  St. Patrick's day became a day of leprechauns rather than St. Patrick.  Thanksgiving became turkey day, and was about harvest, and the thanks to God was removed.  The American holidays were always masonic, so they don't count.  I'm going away, so I'll address the people saying, "Where in the bible does it say that?" next week.

 

Posted Jul 5, '13 at 10:26am

Nerdsoft

Nerdsoft

1,009 posts

Easter, Christ's rising from the dead, somehow only marks the beginning of spring, involving eggs, candy, and bunnies.

Easter was pre-Christ. It was a pagan thing.

Halloween, the eve of all saints, had been turned into monsters and candy only.

Pretty certain that's pagan too.

Thanksgiving became turkey day, and was about harvest, and the thanks to God was removed.

Someone else?

 

Posted Jul 5, '13 at 11:41am

HahiHa

HahiHa

4,937 posts

Knight

Modern consumption society makes money wherever money is to be made. But only because people actually buy stuff. Those who want to remember some religious meaning, will keep it that way, those who don't, won't.

I personally don't care about the religious background. Though I do hate seeing chocolate Easter bunnies in shops in December and Christmas decorations in August though. People really make too much a fuss over it. And spend too much money.

And yeah, as Nerdsoft pointed out. Most of those holidays are pagan in origin and were "christianised" as a means to convert the heathen. Santa stems from Saint Niklaus who in turn is connected to old pagan rituals. Bunnies and eggs are symbols of fertility (remember easter is around Spring). Halloween most certainly has something to do with the witches' Sabbath and/or other pagan rituals.
Only exception is St. Valentine. This one was probably launched by flower and chocolate merchants, or so goes the rumor. And it is no holiday. Besides, every day is "St. Something's" day, so yeah...

 

Posted Jul 5, '13 at 1:44pm

EmperorPalpatine

EmperorPalpatine

4,970 posts

They also took out the Old Norse religious meaning behind the days. For example, Thursday was supposed to honor Thor. Should we keep that tradition?

 

Posted Jul 5, '13 at 2:11pm

Getoffmydangle

Getoffmydangle

148 posts

Thursday was supposed to honor Thor. Should we keep that tradition?

After seeing Thor (the movie), and The Avengers, I vote: Hell Yes!

 

Posted Jul 5, '13 at 2:12pm

Kasic

Kasic

5,564 posts

Christmas

Not made with "Catholic" intentions.

Charlie Brown's Christmas was the last Christmas Special with any religious meaning in it.

Uh. It focused on the meanings behind Christmas, except without anything relating to Christ. Giving/goodwill/etc. And revolved around the Christmas tree, which is a pagan tradition.

Halloween, the eve of all saints, had been turned into monsters and candy only. 

Not a Christian holiday. Christianity just re-purposed it.

Easter, Christ's rising from the dead, somehow only marks the beginning of spring, involving eggs, candy, and bunnies.

As Nerdsoft said, the tradition of celebrating the beginning of spring and having eggs, rabbits and candy predates Christianity. Christianity just adopted it when converting others.

"St." Valentines day, somehow became a day of love, even though it's honoring a saint. 

Hey, what do you know, you're right about this one! St. Valentines day -is- related to Catholicism, and it has been changed into what it is due to the market! One out of 5 ain't too bad, just keep throwing out holidays and eventually you'll get all more right.

Thanksgiving became turkey day, and was about harvest, and the thanks to God was removed.

Thanksgiving has nothing to do with Christianity in particular. Many cultures and religions have festivals celebrating harvest.

The American holidays were always masonic, so they don't count.

No, they don't count because you invalidated everything you're trying to say by asserting these holidays are "Catholic" when they're obviously not.

 

Posted Jul 5, '13 at 2:14pm

Getoffmydangle

Getoffmydangle

148 posts

Thanksgiving has nothing to do with Christianity in particular. Many cultures and religions have festivals celebrating harvest.

not to mention the pilgrims weren't catholic

 

Posted Jul 5, '13 at 3:09pm

KnightDeclan

KnightDeclan

487 posts

Easter was pre-Christ. It was a pagan thing.

That's actually kinda funny how you think that.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter

Pretty certain that's pagan too.

No, Halloween means 'All Holy's eve'  and saint means holy, and it's the day before All Saints Day

Santa stems from Saint Niklaus who in turn is connected to old pagan rituals.

No silly, he was a Christian Bishop.
http://www.biography.com/people/st-nicholas-204635

Halloween most certainly has something to do with the witches' Sabbath and/or other pagan rituals.

Possibly, but it's name and events (One's you don't know about) are all Catholic related. 

Only exception is St. Valentine. This one was probably launched by flower and chocolate merchants, or so goes the rumor. And it is no holiday. Besides, every day is "St. Something's" day, so yeah...

Yes, he was no more special than any other saint, and what I'm saying is that they use it ONLY to make money.

They also took out the Old Norse religious meaning behind the days. For example, Thursday was supposed to honor Thor. Should we keep that tradition?

Well I wouldn't, but if I was norse, I would.  Just like if I'm Catholic, I'd keep my Catholic meaning behind things.  Odin's day is Wednesday, and Sunday is named after the Sun, which was a God.  Saturn, the God, has Saturday.

Uh. It focused on the meanings behind Christmas, except without anything relating to Christ. Giving/goodwill/etc. And revolved around the Christmas tree, which is a pagan tradition.

Funny how every christian holiday just so happens to have pagan background.  What holidays are only pagan?

No, they don't count because you invalidated everything you're trying to say by asserting these holidays are "Catholic" when they're obviously not.

They aren't holy days, so I don't know why people call independents day holy.

 

Posted Jul 5, '13 at 3:14pm

Wyrzen

Wyrzen

325 posts

KnightDeclan, you really need to stop posting, sorry buddy.

Almost all holidays have pagan origins; when Christians became the dominant religion they just adopted them and gave them new meaning.

And wikipedia is not a source. For anything. I could go edit it and say something crazy and then give the link.

 

Posted Jul 5, '13 at 3:34pm

HahiHa

HahiHa

4,937 posts

Knight

No silly, he was a Christian Bishop.

Yes, silly, I know he was. The origins of the traditions for beginning of december are still pagan, until they were christianised using said Bishop.

Funny how every christian holiday just so happens to have pagan background.  What holidays are only pagan?

Hardly any left, I guess, as newly converted christians made a good job of christianising their holidays; which was allowed by the church in its interest. But you could always read some history up here and here.

 
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