ForumsThe TavernHomo Novus: What is possible, what isn't, and whats just awesome!

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Minotaur55
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Minotaur55
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Alright. This is a relatively open thread with a simple concept. In humanities next evolutionary stage, what would you like the to be "Homo Novus" have? Wings? Superior fortitude and physical constitution? Ability to access 90% of their intellect? Anything that may seem plausible. Nothing like a Adamantium shell or something freaky like that.

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Maverick4
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Evolution doesn't have a goal. It is merely a response to a current environment, using natural selection to select those features which are most appropriate situation.

*Shdon Cooper laugh*

pangtongshu
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Apparently, our eyes are supposed to be getting larger. Think...anime.

rayoflight3
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We will become too intelligent, and our brain cells will take control of our bodies. We will powerless against the whims of our own brains.

Minotaur55
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Minotaur55
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*Shdon Cooper laugh*


*ahem* Either you are trying to say the name Sheldon or the Qunari word Shanedan from the game series Dragon Age. Either way, you do not have me stymied.

*gives a snort of derision*

Think...anime.


Oh crap he's right...
TheGenovesan
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TheGenovesan
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Oh crap he's right...

ahem.. she.
Perhaps the ability to not become sick? I know i'd like that.
HahiHa
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Evolution doesn't have a goal. It is merely a response to a current environment, using natural selection to select those features which are most appropriate situation.

Looking at the examples mino listed, I automatically assumed we're talking about artificial enhancements.. you know, like cyborgs.

Possible is prosthesis' like artificial ears, eyes, limbs, and hearts. People that can't walk or are relearning to walk will get exoskeletons to aid, as will some professions linked with heavy loading to prevent back injuries.

But apart from stuff like that, if I am completely honest, I don't think we will change that much in general.. there will certainly always be people implanting things like some already do today, but the big mass of humans won't change.
MacII
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MacII
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I've always fancied having a tail.

You know, apart from balance and a practical third hand (holding a beer and smoking a cigarette whilst reading), think of all the potential in terms of elegance or even fashion. Dress it up, tailor and dye it, proudly flaunt or coyly curl up, etc. The possibilities would indeed seem sheer endless.

GandalftheGrey666
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Well, I think almost nothing would be changed. A big nuclear war might happen, that same war could get us back to our roots, we would have a darker skin, more hair and a more primitive life. There are more options, such as super intelligent humans living in space colonies. And the best of them all is, we might become cyborgs, or, if we prove that there is life in the universe, humans might crossbreed with alien species, which might give some "features" that we didn't have before.

Minotaur55
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And the best of them all is, we might become cyborgs


I'm perfectly fine keeping my humanity, thanks.

humans might crossbreed with alien species, which might give some "features" that we didn't have before.


I wouldn't recommend that as interesting as it sounds. A hypothetical alien civilization that may or may not have a advanced system of doing things breeding with humans will result in a massive amount of responsibility and liability for the alien race. Also, the governments of every country (of Earth) would have different laws of how to approach these civilizations. Some countries would outright forbid it. And some religious-governmental structures might deem these entities "demons" or "jinn" or whatever; with no scientific accuracy whatsoever. Humanity is entirely too divided for us to make peace with other civilizations, let alone breed with them.

Looking at the examples mino listed, I automatically assumed we're talking about artificial enhancements.. you know, like cyborgs


I'm talking about the next phase in human evolution. Not the artificially enhanced human beings that certain governmental structures would use for their own fetishes.

But apart from stuff like that, if I am completely honest, I don't think we will change that much in general.. there will certainly always be people implanting things like some already do today, but the big mass of humans won't change.


That doesn't seem to be much of an advancement. Given the time needed and the proper environment almost all forms of energy change into something different, if not all of them.
stinkyjim
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If evolution is a response to a current environment, then the next plausible trait for us would be reinforced butts for sitting on couches and hands shaped like controllers.

HahiHa
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I'm talking about the next phase in human evolution.

Oh well, in that case. Next evolutionary step, or better, the step currently happening, is us losing our wisdom teeth. Yeehaw.
I would like to see humanity adapting better to bipedal walking, as we are currently only sub-optimally adapted. We might as well go extinct in a few hundred years or less.

Wings? Not gonna happen. Out of all mammals, only few glide and only bats can actively fly. We're just too big for that, and we also need our hands for tool use, so we have no spare part, so to say.

Superior fortitude? Chimps are several times more stronger, relatively compared to us. Apparently we didn't need superior fortitude.

More brain capacity using? You want to fry our brains? Not all of the brain may be working at a time, but all of the brain pretty much gets used regularly.

Tails? We lost them because we didn't need them anymore. But it would be relatively easy to get back to having them, as we still have crippled rests.

Controller hands? Why, how does it make us more adaptive?

Apparently, our eyes are supposed to be getting larger.

Is that an actual observation?

Not the artificially enhanced human beings that certain governmental structures would use for their own fetishes.

Medicine, work.. there are so many places where little enhancements would make things so easier, war machines is really just the usual "government uses technology for weapons" story.
Maverick4
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Medicine, work.. there are so many places where little enhancements would make things so easier, war machines is really just the usual "government uses technology for weapons" story.


Eventually it would bleed over into civillian fields. All the robots Boaton Dynamics build alis funded by DARPA but there are so many applications for it outside of the military, like you said.

Anyways, I rather aggree with Hahiha. I think our ability to create new technologies will change us more than evolution. I see no reason why humans tomorrow wouldn't be using technology as an integral part of their body - cyborgs, if you will. Doctors could have an ocular implant to allow them to see better, and display critical information. Firefighters could have some sort of weave implanted in their skin to make them more tolerant of high temperatures.

Of course, all these jobs could very well be rendered obsolete by robots. Who knows.
Minotaur55
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Medicine, work.. there are so many places where little enhancements would make things so easier, war machines is really just the usual "government uses technology for weapons" story.


As true as that may be it is undeniable that once the technology has been perfected the one major promoter and funding group will be the government. And if history plays any part in this it will only go down hill from there.

Is that an actual observation?


What do you think? =p

Doctors could have an ocular implant to allow them to see better, and display critical information.


Doctors wouldn't do this. If this technology is perfected then being a doctor is an obsolete profession. Any engineer can implant this in you and make repairs when possible. And the medical industry makes a lot of money. I doubt any government would let a large money making system fall simply for human convenience.

And again, if history plays any part in this if it is defective a lot of people will die from side effects or some major defect. It will be just the same as pharmaceutical drugs.

Controller hands? Why, how does it make us more adaptive?


It doesn't. If you look closely the comment is based around the multimedia cliche of the standard American man or woman working a 9 -5 job and sitting on their butt while watching TV or playing video games.
HahiHa
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What do you think? =p

It doesn't. If you look closely the comment is based around the multimedia cliche of the standard American man or woman working a 9 -5 job and sitting on their butt while watching TV or playing video games.

Give it to me straight... internet sarcasm to which I've been oblivious?

Now I ranted enough on how things are not gonna happen... among the improbable but cool things to happen, would be what I've been thinking of since years: chlorophyll skin. Just enough so that we can cover basic physiological needs during a regular day, but still not that much so we can go on enjoying some meals now and then, shifting the urge to eat from a necessity to a pure pleasure thing. Oh, and accessorily shift starvation crysis from a general problem to a mere water problem.
pangtongshu
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I would like to see humanity adapting better to bipedal walking, as we are currently only sub-optimally adapted. We might as well go extinct in a few hundred years or less.


Only sub-optimally? I'm quite interested..if you'd be so kind, could you explain or send me a link so that I could read up on that.

Is that an actual observation?


Three different reads of basically the same thing..the evolutionary change is a prediction by Dr. Alan Kwan, an expert on computational genomics.

Source 1
Source 2
Source 3
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