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People who don't vote in Presidential elections

Posted Nov 6, '13 at 2:28pm

Sonatavarius

Sonatavarius

1,371 posts

I've decided to start this thread out of curiosity. What are your opinions regarding those among us who choose not to vote for the Presidential elections? I've seen some people that get livid when they here that people didn't vote. "People have died for your right to do this, This is really important how can you not vote??, etc"

Personally⦠I've come to the conclusion that there's almost no reason for me to vote. My vote basically doesn't matter. What's your view and why?

 

Posted Nov 6, '13 at 4:27pm

pangtongshu

pangtongshu

10,090 posts

People have died for your right to do this,


They did..and I'm very gracious for them. Because of them, I live in a country where I have the right to choose if I want to vote or not. And because of them, I opt not to vote.

As for me personally..I recently gained voting right..so come next election we will see.
 

Posted Nov 6, '13 at 4:39pm

HahiHa

HahiHa

5,646 posts

Knight

My vote basically doesn't matter.

Your vote does matter. It's just that there are so many more influencing factors that it might seem derisory. But you know what they say: if everybody thought like that, yada yada. But they're right to a degree.

More important than just your vote may be your opinion during discussions, because if your arguments convince, you can influence more than just one vote.

But yeah, pang is right, a right to vote is no obligation to vote. We here don't vote for presidents but recently there were a few things to vote about and I didn't. Screw me. Some matters are so far reaching and my understanding of it so incomplete that I don't always trust myself to give a reasonable vote.
 

Posted Nov 6, '13 at 6:06pm

Terry_Logic

Terry_Logic

4,575 posts

My vote basically doesn't matter.


To me, I believe that my vote does matter to a certain extent, but even had I been old enough to vote in the last presidential election (2 months shy), I probably wouldn't have anyway. I simply didn't like one candidate more than the other enough to prefer one to the other. There were things about both candidates that I liked and disliked, but for the most part, I wasn't a huge fan of either of them, and I didn't really want either of them to be president.

So yes, voting is a right, not an obligation. If we were all required to vote, the freedom of voting would be taken away from us.
 

Posted Nov 6, '13 at 10:20pm

Kasic

Kasic

5,746 posts

but for the most part, I wasn't a huge fan of either of them, and I didn't really want either of them to be president.


This brings up an interesting thought.

What if we counted the amount of people who didn't vote...and if that number exceeded the amount of votes for a particular candidate, none were elected? If we were forced to re-select candidates at that point?
 

Posted Nov 6, '13 at 10:24pm

Nurvana

Nurvana

2,600 posts

If we were forced to re-select candidates at that point?


If that were to be the case, what kind of re-selection process would work? I couldn't imagine you could just find new candidates that satisfy the political views of the majority who didn't vote.
 

Posted Nov 6, '13 at 10:45pm

Freakenstein

Freakenstein

9,646 posts

Moderator

I think what is more important than voting a President into office is voting for our two senators and our 1-55 representatives. Suddenly, the amount of fecal matter hitting the fan is pointing closer and closer to Congress, if it wasn't already pointing in that direction before. Suddenly, the many powers attributed to a President seem lacking in comparison to the big power of legislation Congress has. We put all our energy on one person, but don't give enough effort to our congressman. It's asking a lot for 200 million adults, but we need to see their exploits before voting them in (or back in). We're tired of them, right? Let's....not vote for them anymore?

 

Posted Nov 6, '13 at 11:09pm

EmperorPalpatine

EmperorPalpatine

9,475 posts

I think what is more important than voting a President into office is voting for our two senators and our 1-55 representatives.

Of course. Legislators are directly elected, so the popular vote really matters there. The presidential elections seem like a big trivial opinion poll.
 

Posted Nov 6, '13 at 11:28pm

pangtongshu

pangtongshu

10,090 posts

Suddenly, the many powers attributed to a President seem lacking in comparison to the big power of legislation Congress has


It more seems that we are just voting for someone to be the punching bag for Congress.

Speaking of voting..I find it interesting that many Third-wave feminists complain about the aspect that women are underrepresented in government..yet females make up about 55% of the voting population.

Also..another thing, can't remember his name..but a member of the House spoke about how if his constituents were to want him to vote for slavery to brought back, he would..for he was voted by them to represent them, and because of that fact it is up to him to vote for what his constituents want him to vote for. Thoughts?
 

Posted Nov 6, '13 at 11:39pm

Sonatavarius

Sonatavarius

1,371 posts

I know that voting for matters that are more close to home are really important⦠I just don't always have the time to go and vote on whatever day it is now that I'm in med school (my last few years of undergrad weren't too easy either lol)⦠I left it ambiguous for a reason. Now I'll elaborate.

With the way the US electoral college ends up working out it basically nullifies any reason for me voting for president. Theoretically the representatives or the votes that come from the college don't have to mirror the vote of the populace. But even then, the vote usually ends up going winner takes all. If a state has 30 electoral votes and 50.0001% of the state goes one way then they get all 30 votes. This makes it so that my vote, a Mississippian's vote, unequal to anyone from another state that doesn't have the same electoral votes. Quite a few times I remember that the vote didn't even wait for my state and/or other states' votes to get reported before basically calling off the race. If you've called off the race before my state even gets tallied, then you've told me that my voice doesn't matter. You've treated my state's people's opinions as being lesser and of no value. On the news there are times when there will be multiple states finishing up and the news people will say "the only state that matters is _______" b/c their electoral vote count so far outweighs the others that no one wants to hear what the others have to say. I feel that as long as the electoral college stays in place that I will have no place in voting for my president. People say that it is some ancient fail safe that guards the stupid decisions of the populace, but I'm just going to call all of that a load of horse crap. The EC had its place back in the days of no internet and such⦠now, it's a relic that serves to segregate the people in to important voters and non important voters. Mississippi's 6 Republican votes vs California and New York's 55 and 23 whatever votes barely makes it even worth tallying. There might come a day when our 6 somehow make a difference, but the fact that my vote doesn't count as much as everyone else's still demeans the act of voting.

 
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