Forums

ForumsThe Tavern

Etymologic Question: Body

Posted Nov 9, '13 at 2:40am

roydotor2000

roydotor2000

250 posts

Why do we call our bodies, bodies? pls. post your opinions here. \\/

 

Posted Nov 9, '13 at 4:02am

EmperorPalpatine

EmperorPalpatine

4,977 posts

Why do we call anything anything? People decided to communicate through phonetics by deciding that [spoken sounds in a particular order] represent [thing]. Over time, the pronunciation of stuff changes due to regional dialects and such. In this case, "body" came from Old English "bodeg/bodig", which is from Proto-Germanic "budagÄ...", which may have stemmed from words meaning ground, in the sense that that's where corpses go.

 

Posted Nov 9, '13 at 4:11am

pangtongshu

pangtongshu

8,576 posts

which may have stemmed from words meaning ground, in the sense that that's where corpses go.

In that sense..I would think that it would stem from such a word because the body used to be thought of related to the ground, not in the sense of that is where we ended, but began.

Some mythos fun.

 

Posted Nov 9, '13 at 8:24am

MacII

MacII

1,369 posts

Good question, looks to be pretty murky at a glance: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=body .

You could ask at World Wide Words, I've known him to answer if you courteously and non-imposingly ask the right question (arguably quite some years ago, don't know how much busier today than he already was then).

 

Posted Nov 9, '13 at 9:18am

Devoidless

Devoidless

3,553 posts

I vote we all refer to our 'bodies' by using the word "Doofenshmirtz" instead. It's a great word and singular can be used as the plural. It would make some songs a whole lot better.
Ex)
Girl, look at that Doofenshmirtz
Girl, loot at that Doofenshmirtz
Girl, look at that Doofenshmirtz
I work out!

 

Posted Nov 9, '13 at 5:50pm

Minotaur55

Minotaur55

1,255 posts

Knight

We call our bodies "bodies" because they must hit the FLOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOR!!!!!!!!!

Anyways, the word "Body" roots from the Latin word "Corpus" and most of English roots from Latin. So with some translations upon translations it wound up becoming the word "Body" or in other cases "Bodies".

 

Posted Nov 9, '13 at 6:50pm

Reton8

Reton8

2,629 posts

Moderator

I thought corpse had it's roots in the latin word corpus (From Old French cors, from Latin corpus. Source).

I thought body had different roots:
Body from Old English bodig (Source 1 and Source 2)

The Spanish word for body (cuerpo) has the same root as corpse
From latin corpus (Source)
___________________________________________________________

"Curse you Perry the Platypus!" - Heinz Body

 

Posted Nov 9, '13 at 8:38pm

jeol

jeol

3,565 posts

Truly, our bodies must be called bodies, because the word 'bodacious' exists.

And as it stands, that word will now be a part of my everyday vocabulary.

 

Posted Nov 9, '13 at 8:51pm

Freakenstein

Freakenstein

8,148 posts

Moderator

In Anti-Cenere, the word for body is kropp. The why's to this has already been explained :)

 

Posted Nov 10, '13 at 12:13am

Devoidless

Devoidless

3,553 posts

Girl, look at that Doofenshmirtz
Girl, loot at that Doofenshmirtz
Girl, look at that Doofenshmirtz

That's it. No more RPGs for a while. Although that does give me an idea...

Doofenshmirtz of Wild Persuasion
0 AC
Equipable by:
All
Effects:
- Bind on equip (Cursed)
- When attempting to pass a charisma check, roll 1d8. Odd numbers are added to your charisma for the check, even numbers are deducted.

 
Reply to Etymologic Question: Body

You must be logged in to post a reply!