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Etymologic Question: Body

Posted Nov 10, '13 at 12:25am

Nurvana

Nurvana

2,179 posts

Your Doofenshmirtz is a wonderland...

 

Posted Nov 10, '13 at 5:42am

MacII

MacII

1,369 posts

Beiherhund das Oder die Flipperwaldt gersput!

most of English roots from Latin

You're sure not from Sanskrit? (Not sure really, but an amazing bit of European languages do. I guess they're called Indo-European for a reason.)

 

Posted Nov 10, '13 at 6:35am

roydotor2000

roydotor2000

250 posts

Any further history?

 

Posted Nov 10, '13 at 7:32am

Reton8

Reton8

2,646 posts

Moderator

...most of English roots from Latin

This is somewhat true indeed, but English is more messy lol.

The roots of English are actually quite a mess and hence a reason for English to be difficult to learn. The English writing system long long ago used Anglo-Saxon runes and then was replaced by the Latin Script.

The Old English language was transformed by two invasions. The first invasion by Norther Germanic speakers (8th and 9th century) and the second invasion by  by speakers of the Romance language Old Norman (11th century). Both invasions had a strong influence and brought many changes to the language. The changes in the language from the Normans lead Old English into what is now considered Middle English.  Today, what is spoken is Modern English, and yes I'm grabbing this all from Wikipedia. (Two more helpful articles, English language and The History of the English Language.)

Here is the breakdown of influences in English Vocabulary:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/Origins_of_English_PieChart_2D.svg

Just think of some of the French words used in English:
genre, résumé, cul-de-sac, à la carte, avant-garde, café, coup de grâce, fiancé, foyer, melee

I mean it all makes for a lot of confusing pronunciation rules have word origins from three different places. I can see why people may have difficulty learning the language.

 

Posted Nov 10, '13 at 7:59am

HahiHa

HahiHa

5,043 posts

Knight

Just think of some of the French words used in English:

Those are all more or less direct gallicism if I'm not wrong. English, originally, does not stem from Latin. It seems as you show that it has had a lot of influences; nevertheless I disagree with the statement that "most of English roots from Latin"

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e … nTreeA.svg

 

Posted Nov 10, '13 at 1:04pm

jeol

jeol

3,565 posts

Those are all more or less direct gallicism if I'm not wrong. English, originally, does not stem from Latin. It seems as you show that it has had a lot of influences; nevertheless I disagree with the statement that "most of English roots from Latin"

You are correct in that English does not originally stem from Latin. However, the original form of English is nowhere near the form of English today. The statement makes the assumption that most of spoken English roots from Latin, which is correct, as today's spoken English does as opposed to English from centuries prior. Indeed, most English speakers today would not understand English from centuries prior.

 
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