ForumsThe TavernEtymologic Question: Body

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roydotor2000
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roydotor2000
344 posts
Peasant

Why do we call our bodies, bodies? pls. post your opinions here. \\/

  • 15 Replies
EmperorPalpatine
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EmperorPalpatine
9,427 posts
Jester

Why do we call anything anything? People decided to communicate through phonetics by deciding that [spoken sounds in a particular order] represent [thing]. Over time, the pronunciation of stuff changes due to regional dialects and such. In this case, "body" came from Old English "bodeg/bodig", which is from Proto-Germanic "budagÄ...", which may have stemmed from words meaning ground, in the sense that that's where corpses go.

pangtongshu
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pangtongshu
9,991 posts
Scribe

which may have stemmed from words meaning ground, in the sense that that's where corpses go.


In that sense..I would think that it would stem from such a word because the body used to be thought of related to the ground, not in the sense of that is where we ended, but began.

Some mythos fun.
MacII
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MacII
1,348 posts
Farmer

Good question, looks to be pretty murky at a glance: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=body .

You could ask at World Wide Words, I've known him to answer if you courteously and non-imposingly ask the right question (arguably quite some years ago, don't know how much busier today than he already was then).

Devoidless
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Devoidless
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Scribe

I vote we all refer to our 'bodies' by using the word "Doofenshmirtz" instead. It's a great word and singular can be used as the plural. It would make some songs a whole lot better.
Ex)
Girl, look at that Doofenshmirtz
Girl, loot at that Doofenshmirtz
Girl, look at that Doofenshmirtz
I work out!

Minotaur55
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Minotaur55
1,388 posts
Jester

We call our bodies "bodies" because they must hit the FLOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOR!!!!!!!!!

Anyways, the word "Body" roots from the Latin word "Corpus" and most of English roots from Latin. So with some translations upon translations it wound up becoming the word "Body" or in other cases "Bodies".

Reton8
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Reton8
3,050 posts
King

I thought corpse had it's roots in the latin word corpus (From Old French cors, from Latin corpus. Source).

I thought body had different roots:
Body from Old English bodig (Source 1 and Source 2)

The Spanish word for body (cuerpo) has the same root as corpse
From latin corpus (Source)
___________________________________________________________

"Curse you Perry the Platypus!" - Heinz Body

jeol
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jeol
3,842 posts
Herald

Truly, our bodies must be called bodies, because the word 'bodacious' exists.

And as it stands, that word will now be a part of my everyday vocabulary.

Freakenstein
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Freakenstein
9,554 posts
Bard

In Anti-Cenere, the word for body is kropp. The why's to this has already been explained

Devoidless
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Devoidless
3,712 posts
Scribe

Girl, look at that Doofenshmirtz
Girl, loot at that Doofenshmirtz
Girl, look at that Doofenshmirtz


That's it. No more RPGs for a while. Although that does give me an idea...

Doofenshmirtz of Wild Persuasion
0 AC
Equipable by:
All
Effects:
- Bind on equip (Cursed)
- When attempting to pass a charisma check, roll 1d8. Odd numbers are added to your charisma for the check, even numbers are deducted.
Nurvana
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Nurvana
2,535 posts
Blacksmith

Your Doofenshmirtz is a wonderland...

MacII
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MacII
1,348 posts
Farmer

Beiherhund das Oder die Flipperwaldt gersput!

most of English roots from Latin


You're sure not from Sanskrit? (Not sure really, but an amazing bit of European languages do. I guess they're called Indo-European for a reason.)
roydotor2000
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roydotor2000
344 posts
Peasant

Any further history?

Reton8
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Reton8
3,050 posts
King

...most of English roots from Latin


This is somewhat true indeed, but English is more messy lol.

The roots of English are actually quite a mess and hence a reason for English to be difficult to learn. The English writing system long long ago used Anglo-Saxon runes and then was replaced by the Latin Script.

The Old English language was transformed by two invasions. The first invasion by Norther Germanic speakers (8th and 9th century) and the second invasion by by speakers of the Romance language Old Norman (11th century). Both invasions had a strong influence and brought many changes to the language. The changes in the language from the Normans lead Old English into what is now considered Middle English. Today, what is spoken is Modern English, and yes I'm grabbing this all from Wikipedia. (Two more helpful articles, English language and The History of the English Language.)

Here is the breakdown of influences in English Vocabulary:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/Origins_of_English_PieChart_2D.svg

Just think of some of the French words used in English:
genre, résumé, cul-de-sac, à la carte, avant-garde, café, coup de grâce, fiancé, foyer, melee

I mean it all makes for a lot of confusing pronunciation rules have word origins from three different places. I can see why people may have difficulty learning the language.
HahiHa
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HahiHa
7,131 posts
Grand Duke

Just think of some of the French words used in English:

Those are all more or less direct gallicism if I'm not wrong. English, originally, does not stem from Latin. It seems as you show that it has had a lot of influences; nevertheless I disagree with the statement that "most of English roots from Latin"

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/0d/IndoEuropeanTreeA.svg
jeol
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jeol
3,842 posts
Herald

Those are all more or less direct gallicism if I'm not wrong. English, originally, does not stem from Latin. It seems as you show that it has had a lot of influences; nevertheless I disagree with the statement that "most of English roots from Latin"

You are correct in that English does not originally stem from Latin. However, the original form of English is nowhere near the form of English today. The statement makes the assumption that most of spoken English roots from Latin, which is correct, as today's spoken English does as opposed to English from centuries prior. Indeed, most English speakers today would not understand English from centuries prior.
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