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Taxation without Representation

Posted Nov 17, '13 at 12:37pm

crazyape

crazyape

501 posts

Now, this has probably been addressed a thousand times, but it bears repeating. Republicans help the 1%, and the democrats help the poor (not necessarily a good thing). The reason the 1% vote for the Republicans is because they want the middle class to pay for them.The reason people in the 20% poverty rate vote for Democrats is that they want the middle class to pay for their insurance, healthcare, and welfare.

But wait! What about the middle class? At about roughly 45% of the country's population, it seems like they're paying for everyone with their tax dollars. Where's their representation? Just look it up. Bupkes. Nobody represents them. They're caught in the middle of a political slapfest that they're paying for.

Some more food for thought, the majority of non-voters are middle class. I wonder why...

 

Posted Nov 17, '13 at 7:13pm

thepunisher93

thepunisher93

1,859 posts

If you saw british tax laws, you'll cry blood.
lowest rate is 20% there.

 

Posted Nov 18, '13 at 12:06am

pangtongshu

pangtongshu

8,704 posts

Now, this has probably been addressed a thousand times, but it bears repeating. Republicans help the 1%, and the democrats help the poor (not necessarily a good thing). The reason the 1% vote for the Republicans is because they want the middle class to pay for them.The reason people in the 20% poverty rate vote for Democrats is that they want the middle class to pay for their insurance, healthcare, and welfare.

Eh..not really. My politics game isn't strong by any means..so hopefully someone can come here with a better answer, but from my understanding the Republicans aren't helping the 1%, but trying to make taxes an equal rate across the board, rather than higher rates as you gain more money (as this staggered rates change does have its flaws). The Democratics, conversely, are trying to make that heightened rate per higher income, as to try to equalize the classes more and create less of a gap between classes.

The reason the "1%" (really those with higher income) tend to vote republican (not sure on these numbers..so don't quote me on it) is because they don't want to have to have such an increase rate because of income...lose their hard earned money. Not because they want to piggy back onto the middle class with their money.

The reason the poorer classes tend to vote democratic is because of a desire for aid in the poverty state so that they may have a chance for a comfortable life. Not because they want to the middle class to pull them along and into a better or easier life.

And so I don't get attacked much, I'm generalizing the sides.

But wait! What about the middle class? At about roughly 45% of the country's population, it seems like they're paying for everyone with their tax dollars.

Everyone is (should be) paying taxes. From my understanding, the issue with the middle class is not that they are paying for everyone else, but because there is little focus on them because of the sway between the parties.

 

Posted Nov 18, '13 at 1:56am

EmperorPalpatine

EmperorPalpatine

5,011 posts

but from my understanding the Republicans aren't helping the 1%, but trying to make taxes an equal rate across the board, rather than higher rates as you gain more money

Which would still benefit those with more money due to flat costs. Ex: a gallon of gas costs the same for everyone, but it's a bigger percentage of a poorer person's budget; a share of common stock costs the same for everyone, but it's a bigger percentage of a poorer person's savings.

The reason the "1%" (really those with higher income) tend to vote republican (not sure on these numbers..so don't quote me on it)

41% of the 1% say they are moderate/independent, 39% say conservative, 20% say liberal. If the political leanings of the independents are added, 57% of the total say they are republican or are independents leaning republican, 36% democratic or independents leaning democratic. Source.

is because they don't want to have to have such an increase rate because of income

That is a factor, but for some the problem is the government deficit, and that the democrats' current financial plan of maxing out America's credit card doesn't make the problems go away. Nearly 1/3 of the 1% find the deficit to be the biggest problem in America, 65% of those wanted spending cuts and 21% wanted spending cuts with tax increases. Source

Everyone is (should be) paying taxes.

In 2010, about 143M tax returns were filed and 41% of those owed no federal income tax. Source.

the issue with the middle class is not that they are paying for everyone else, but because there is little focus on them because of the sway between the parties.

Mostly. If you're not on the top or bottom, you won't likely feel much of what the government does. For example, my state just voted with bipartisan support to cut total state property taxes by $100M over the next two years. Some businesses and universities save thousands, but the average homeowner will save just $17 per year.

 

Posted Nov 18, '13 at 8:03am

nichodemus

nichodemus

12,169 posts

Knight

Overall, I would say that the Democratic Party is more friendly towards the middle class than the Republican Party. Of course, this is merely on a federal level, and each and every state has it's own unique flavour when it comes to bipartisanship, or intra-party politics. It carries a broader swath of support with the populace (working classes, labour, youth, professionals, academia, etc), because it's policies are geared more towards helping the smaller folk, i.e the middle - lower classes. A universal healthcare policy for all, with subsidies for SMEs will definitely benefit middle class businessmen for one.

I think it abit unfair to merely label the Democratic Party as one that draws it's support from the lower strata of society. It's not a rabble-rousing, mob raising, socialist party allied to worker unions. Likewise, I'm sure some of the Republicans, especially the more moderate ones, have policies that benefit the middle class, once again probably more ubiquitous in state policies, and not federal ones.

 

Posted Nov 18, '13 at 8:05am

nichodemus

nichodemus

12,169 posts

Knight

Oh, and it's a little narrow-minded to view voting solely via economic policies! (Duh....) Some folk vote due to race, a hard truth, but nonetheless a truth. Some people vote for the party with a better energy policy. Or one that supports LGBT rights. Multiple ways to slice the cake.

 
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