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High exprectations in school

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Posted Apr 2, '08 at 8:12pm

Armed_Blade

Armed_Blade

1,563 posts

Nowaways, Decadent, we are challenged, if I or anyone else am one of those brightest.

Its called upper level, Horizons, AP. Whatever, they'll go to college for you as long as you get the credit.

Also, Strop, what I meant by that was that you shouldn't waste your education [something millions wish for] on a life you'll have for 20 years. So, in practicallity, its just 20 years of fun and the rest are sorrow. I wouldn't call that a life.  I say have fun with it, but don't let your education drop below something just as stupid as your last football game or family guy episodes. I'm sure there are others to come. :P

 

Posted Apr 2, '08 at 8:15pm

daswiftarrow

daswiftarrow

930 posts

well like i said armed blade, im studying and doing things for school in alot of my free time

 

Posted Apr 2, '08 at 8:20pm

Armed_Blade

Armed_Blade

1,563 posts

I have noticed something, also. When you were small and you saw your dad come home from work, you would just think he'd work. You wouldn't ask him what he knew about his job and how to handle it. Since, you wouldn't know about all the crap your forced to learn just to get there. So in America, you don't see any hardships to buy stuff, most drop outs are from middle class familys. They can sustain what they want, knowing their not rich. Middle class can go down to people that don't have jobs that seem so complicated. Therefor, by the time your older, you might think your learning this junk all for nothing.  At least, I know some people that think that way.

Also, nowadays in highschool, upper level courses and AP courses raise the # of your GPA, Or GPR. Therefor, if you have a ratio of 7. [Some freakishly divine way. I would think it'd be rather hard to have straight A's all through year in AP classes.] But its possible, and with that, those students are pushed. But now all these expectations are being thrown about. In Texas, this year is the year Eight graders MUST pass the TAKS test in Reading and Math. I got a chance to look at the test. It  turned out it was easy, the stupidest person I know could have passed. So it turns out, theres no real  "Government pushing as hard as possible".

I also heard STROP saying that world wide grades and averages were low in the US. Your right. I mean, my cousins education is considered crap, but they know a freaking JUNK load. They get summer-vacation homework, Algebra  they started in 7th grade. [Algebra, not Pre algebra]. Its rather scary. xP

But, now that the education system is so weak, rushing it up to a level of greatness would be hard.

 

Posted Apr 2, '08 at 10:56pm

quillandsaber

quillandsaber

37 posts

I've never really had a problem with too high expectations until I took Calculus.  The teacher told us that we should have MAYBE one question the first day we cover a subject and absolutely no questions the second day.  She won't even take questions the second day; instead she'll tell us how we're slacking and not working.

 

Posted Apr 3, '08 at 5:20am

Strop

Strop

10,824 posts

Moderator

Uhm, just to clarify, Armed, I wasn't the one who said that US education standards are crap. That was DecadentDragon.

What I did say however is that we're collectively slowly wising up to the deficiency in many of the world's education systems at large: the system, or rather the measures made to try and 'fix' it tend to be short results-oriented fixes. What the education system needs to do is to foster something that's going to form the basis of a person's intellectual skillset and vocational mindset.

BTW, by "we", I mean internationally- I'm not a US resident.

Armed, I think the difference between our perspectives on what 'life' means (in this discussion) is mainly due to several years' age difference. From what I've said above, education in itself can become a part of life, and what you gain from it will change how you live your life. So it's not just for some 20 year compartment, and education isn't simply for the sake of a career (this is a results-oriented mindset which merely demonstrates my criticism of the education system!)

In the end, we are still talking about life, managing a life and building one up. Obviously some balance is to be sought. Kids dropping below the "acceptable standard" of education (however this is defined) is one problem, and strangely enough, the increasingly common practice of "hot-housing" (high-pressure education) is of the same vein.