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Not One Minute

Posted Jul 27, '12 at 9:36am

zakyman

zakyman

1,588 posts

Many of us all have some knowledge about the Munich Olympic Massacre which occurred in 1972, 40 years ago. In this tragedy against peace and sportsmanship, Palestinian terrorists entered the Olympic Village and killed 11 members of the Israeli Olympic Team. 40 years later, the survivors of this injustice and the relatives of the victims are only asking for one minute of silence to remember the athletes who where killed. However the IOC have turned them down time after time after time claiming it would make the Games, "too political." However, as Representative Nita Lowey of New York states, "For those of the IOC who say that this (moment of silence) is political, I would say just the opposite: If this were any nation other than Israel, there would have been a moment of silence long ago." And I believe this to be the unfortunate case, because, in the aftermath of the killings in 1972, the Arab nations refused to have any hand in the mourning of the athletes, showing that they supported these murders.

Do you think that the Munich 11 (as they are so immortalized) deserve one minute of silence? Or do you think the IOC is correct in attempting to allow the massacres to fade from memory?

 

Posted Jul 27, '12 at 12:30pm

HahiHa

HahiHa

5,086 posts

Knight

The Palestino-Israeli conflict has always been a hot potato to anyone else. I think this is one of the main reasons... after all, the IOC has to remain impartial, and there are several Arab nations taking part who wouldn't agree to showing respect to the victims. The massacre of course goes against Olympic values and so it is only fair that the IOC made the two memorials in Munich.

Now one minute of silence doesn't seem much, and remembering massacred victims is only fair too, but I guess it's the mere fact of honoring Israelis that would infuriate some countries. They're part of the Olympic community too and thus their opinion must be respected, right or not. This you must understand.

The only thing I find ridiculous is that during the memorial service after the massacre, the Arab nations could enforce that their flag weren't lowered in honor to the victims. Whether you like the country or not, you should still show tribute to the athletes..

 

Posted Jul 27, '12 at 1:43pm

zakyman

zakyman

1,588 posts

Whether you like the country or not, you should still show tribute to the athletes..

Which is why it is ridiculous that a few Arab nations could force the IOC to not even recognize the massacre.

The massacre of course goes against Olympic values and so it is only fair that the IOC made the two memorials in Munich.

If you're talking about the services, those were hardly publicized at all. To claim that that counts as memorializing the victims in the "proper" way as the IOC has done is complete bull.

They're part of the Olympic community too and thus their opinion must be respected, right or not. This you must understand.

The thing that I take issue with is that had this been a massacre against, say, the English team, then there would be a memorial year after year after year. Only because it is Israel, that is why we cannot have a memorial at the Opening Ceremony.

 

Posted Jul 27, '12 at 2:02pm

HahiHa

HahiHa

5,086 posts

Knight

Which is why it is ridiculous that a few Arab nations could force the IOC to not even recognize the massacre.

They allowed the Arab nations to not honor the victims, but as far as I've read your link, the IOC definitely recognized the massacre. Not as one may deem respectable (I'm talking about the service here), but they did.

If you're talking about the services, those were hardly publicized at all. To claim that that counts as memorializing the victims in the "proper" way as the IOC has done is complete bull.

No, I'm talking about these:

"There is, however, a memorial outside the Olympic stadium in Munich in the form of a stone tablet at the bridge linking the stadium to the former Olympic village. There is also a memorial tablet to the slain Israelis outside the front door of their former lodging at 31 Connollystra├če. On 15 October 1999 (almost a year before the Sydney 2000 Games), a memorial plaque was unveiled in one of the large light towers (Tower 14) outside the Sydney Olympic Stadium."
(last paragraph of this section)

The thing that I take issue with is that had this been a massacre against, say, the English team, then there would be a memorial year after year after year. Only because it is Israel, that is why we cannot have a memorial at the Opening Ceremony.

I sincerely doubt they'd make a memorial year after year after year for any country, really. This is a baseless accusation unless proven otherwise. Do you know of any other massacre of Olympic athletes?

 

Posted Jul 27, '12 at 9:29pm

thepunisher93

thepunisher93

1,859 posts

here it is another massacre

 

Posted Jul 27, '12 at 10:13pm

Spyton

Spyton

50 posts

People die in heroic or tragic situations all the time. If we were to start holding a minute of silence in every activity that anything like this happened. We would be forever in a "minute" of silence. I say instead of continously petitioning the olympics for this minute. The country who had this happen hold a minute of silence themselves before the games. And just invite every one to do it with them.

 

Posted Jul 28, '12 at 12:54am

pickpocket

pickpocket

3,529 posts

I say they should get the moment of silence. It was the deaths of innocent people doing what they love for the world. The world should give back. I dont care if you like the country or not, people are people no matter their nation.

 

Posted Jul 28, '12 at 1:22am

Tactical_Fish

Tactical_Fish

429 posts

I agree with pickpocket. Part of the Olympics is putting aside the differences between nations. And like he said,

people are people no matter their nation.

 

Posted Jul 28, '12 at 7:14am

DSM

DSM

799 posts

Would that one minute bring them back? It something that happened 40 years ago, so I don't see exactly why they should.

I don't want to sound heartless, but what makes them so special. I mean there is millions that died, and I bet they wont even be remembered. No one cares about them, are they not humans?

 

Posted Jul 28, '12 at 8:11am

partydevil

partydevil

5,109 posts

We feel that the opening ceremony is an atmosphere that is not fit to remember such a tragic accident," IOC President Jacques Rogge said at a press conference last weekend, referring to what most others call a "massacre."

(they do not deny that it happend.)

As for the man representing Palestinian Olympic hopefuls, apparently a moment of silence to honor their memory is cause for "divisiveness" and "racism."

Rajoub, former head of security for the late Yasser Arafat and a senior member of the Palestinian Authority's Fatah faction, sent IOC President Jacque Rogge a thank you letter, Ynet reported.

"Sport is a bridge for love, unification and for spreading peace among the nations," Rajoub wrote. "It must not be a cause for divisiveness and for the spreading of racism."

i hope you guys see now why they don't do it?

source

 
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