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some random writing and art of mine~ necromancer

Posted Mar 17, '09 at 10:42pm

necromancer

necromancer

641 posts

So yeah, I'll just post some of the stuff I have written or drawn for classes or fun.

First, a sketch from today. (Saint Patty's Day for future reference)

http://i415.photobucket.com/albums/pp231/necromancerlord/stpattysday.jpg?t=1237344027

A poem titled "setting sun"

Cry,softly,
Weep sweetly,
Mourning dove's song
Rosebud's embrace
never long
with flower gone
Day is night
Night is blackest hell
Embers shed no light
Life's joys
die

And a joke essay for AP Lang. -how homework causes genocide.

On Homework:  Changes in the politics of education during the twentieth century

I. The early modern homework system

Just before the turn of the twentieth century students were provided a single task by schools: to remember.  They were instructed to rote-memorize the facts, no more, no less.  Tests demanded facts, analysis and insight was not needed, only recall.  They were asked for definitions, dates, and cities but not understanding [1].   The mind served as a vessel, it was a means to contain.  It functioned not on its own but instead as part of the body.  The matter of importance in educational life was the child as a whole rather than their intellect alone.  Edward Bok waged a war against homework on the grounds it caused a great number of maladies: stress, eye strain, acne, sleeplessness, violence, physical ailments, and spinal deformities [2]. He focused his ire on acts that injured the body, not the mind, decrying “the national crime” of excessive “brain work.”  Such rhetoric even persuaded the state of California to pass a law banning homework.  What was perceived as valuable wasn’t the child’s education but the condition of their working body.  The children’s identity as a machine converged with the machines they worked.  Indeed, education came to a convergence with industrialized economy.
Manufacturers, seeking cheaper child labor aroused fury against homework to end it.  After school duties, children were freed to work.  It provided a convenient place of control, a way to ensure that laborers would be healthy and strong.  While the opposite also was true, homework merged with other work in some critics’ arguments to end it, claiming that it was in violation of child labor laws [3]. Throughout the era, it was firstly a means of work and an ends towards work, even as simple memorization.
It was secondly a crude method of class control through surveillance.  The teacher’s gaze directly over student.  She would order them work and they would comply.  Those who did not would see little hope of escaping the worker class.  The teacher would ensure of that.  Not memorizing, the dates and the arbitrarium of material caused one to be labeled a ‘bad subject.’  They were not fit for higher work, they were not fit for higher ‘education’, and hence, they failed the examinations.  The poor could not afford to have their students do their schoolwork though, horror stories flood from the Progressivists telling of the child labor. After school, their children worked.  Maybe as a ‘newsie’ in the street, as a paper flower maker in a home workshop, or a canning machine operator- the system left them bereft of opportunities to advance.
II. The technological system.
In the 1960s the system progressed out of the “progressive system.”  As the Russian rockets went up so did the American homework load to encourage students to match their communist counter-parts.  In 1958 the National Defense Education Act was passed.  It strongly encouraged the school system to adopt greater amounts of homework in mathematics and science [4].    No longer simple arithmetic and basic knowledge, students were encouraged to explore the functions of math and science in algebra, conic geometry, and trigonometry or physics and the growing study of evolution.
Homework progressed to studying the “absolute arts”, those of science and math; where before the goal was to learn the answer. It was now to find the answer.  The students were encouraged to analyze and follow methods of deduction.  How else were they to arrive at the solution to the problem or the scientific conclusion?  The aesthetique homework appealed to was now analysis, a closed analysis.  The scribbling of pencils on paper here becomes a moment of prestidigitation.  The scrawling hand is told to trick the mind into believing that it is now finding its own way, but always arrives at the same conclusion. Hence the state now has the power to tell its pupils its truth, its version of reality.  School can be used as an institution to encourage the people to act for the nation, by inserting that as a “truth” of existence. It may tell people of its ideal political reality to prevent its questioning.
The earlier methods of class control were augmented by the new system of homework.  However, instead of seeking out who was wealthy and who was not, it was designed to redesign the classes to its own liking.  It was a matter of who would carry out the steps to solve the problem and reach the truth.  Only those who could be taken into the truth and also have the aptitude in math and science were allowed to achieve. Chosen to lead the future of society they were also the most taken by the grasp of the old, they did as it commanded.  Political power in the hands of knowledge and status was meant to be carried on to the next generation.  Those who didn’t make the grade were consigned to position of the blue collar worker in the industrial nation, while those who did were given authority over them as the engineers and managers.  Not only did they have power over the lower class but they had knowledge over them changing the way work by creating new technologies.

III.  The modern homework of servility

The politics of homework, so rooted in the industrial process, underwent a re-stitching of their fabric as the underlying economic conditions changed.  The era of industrial production changed to one of service [5].  Twenty three percent of the economy manufactures and forty one percent is service, the old system can not function.  Instead the system focuses on creating a populace acclimated to the service economy.
Homework loads are still increasing [6]. However their goal has shifted from an emphasis on math and science to language and communications. The recent No Child Left Behind Act called for an increase in language arts skills on standardized tests; foreign language programs are gaining popularity, many universities are requiring several years of them to enter.  The point of such programs is to increase the communication skills necessary for  service jobs, likewise homework in such areas has dramatically increased.
Focus now shifts to the analysis inherent of language.  Within this analysis however, the student still is always ushered to a sempiternal conclusion by the questions asked of them.  The author is seen as the center of authority.  Even in the open ended world of writing there is a right and a wrong.  No longer as direct, the system gains efficiency through its own subliminality.  In a world where power can never be felt as a certainty the student learns to accept its ever-persistent growth and surveillance of him.
  Following earlier traditions homework still seeks at its core a way to oppress that which the state deems ‘undesirable.’  In the latest mutation it does this through a new network of power.  The sociality expressed in the needs of service demands such networks.  The teacher serves as the highest administrator of power.  The center of the Panopticon is initially the teacher [7].  She gains a superior knowledge of the students, who does their work, and more importantly who does not; who is intelligent, and who is not; who is good tempered and who is not; who is the ideal student, and who is not.  The central construction then gyrates out to the students who also gain an intimate knowledge of each other in the same regards.  They are set out to do group work, review each other’s work and so on.  This serves to both allow the teacher access to view their social compatibility and the students to gain control over each other. It ensures that they are ensnared from the beginning into a system of automatic functioning of the power.  The effects become permanent. A perpetual feel of power from either the teacher or the student.  Another system flourishes too with the parent as the ‘visible viewer.’ They hold direct authority to punish the student for failing marks.  While the power may not have the same coercive properties of hidden power it makes obvious the danger of betraying those with power.  It serves as a companion to the hidden.  It makes serious their threats.  However, it also betrays this power to encourage the students own support of authority, eighty-three percent of parents believe the most important role in education they have is to check homework [8].  The power to destroy is hidden by the power to help.  Creating a state of both love and fear ensuring the citizen’s subjection to the state.  Within this sphere of surveillance and subjection the state has the powers necessary to locate that which it deems undesirable via the watching eyes of the teacher.

IV. Genocide

Throughout these time periods the state has exercised its power to control classes and repress the ‘undesirable.’  The system has gained much efficiency and enabled an imminent ability to wield the power of homework.  It grants the ability to control the details of a student’s life: passing, free-time, and ideas.  When the state has the ability to determine what the lives of its citizens are it has the ability to determine if its citizens have lives.  It can determine what is undesirable and it can determine to expunge that.  Genocidal imperialism is given a foothold within the grounds of homework.  Foucault said, “If genocide is indeed the dream of modern powers, this is not because of a return of the ancient right to kill; it is because power is situated and exercised at the level of life, the species, the race, and the large-scale phenomena of the population.” [9]  All of these can be seen in the current regime of homework, the ability to know and control the details of a students life, what is ‘desirable,’ and the interaction of the population with the world and economy.
This is also present in historical examples of the genocide that homework causes.  A German textbook on biology from 1937 begins a chapter thus “We have come to the following understanding: 1. Nature’s laws of heredity are undeniably true.  All living creatures, humans included, are subject to these laws. 2. Humans are not equal, but rather of differing races.  The drives and strengths that create cultures are rooted in the race’s genes.  Our race too has a racial inheritance and a culture that grows out of it.  We must fight for it… The success and final victory of this great task depends: - on the law of selection - on the elimination of those with hereditary illness - on the promotion of genetically strong bloodlines " on maintaining purity of blood.” [10] and “The racial and Jewish Question is the central problem of the National Socialist worldview. Solving this problem will ensure the survival of National Socialism and thereby the survival of our people for all time.” [11] Here we can see what is ‘desirable’ and what is not, along with the influence on a student’s perception and ideas, and the attitude towards what makes the population best off. When an education system is based on these systems it is always prepared to serve such violent ends.

V. Solution

The most immediate and effective solution is a complete dismantling of homework system.  Without that institution the growth of destructive cycles may slowed.  Others disagree and opt for making homework “not count.” [12] Yet this will not solve problem, in fact, it may make it worse.  It will veil the teacher’s power without it affecting grades; instead the teacher is even more of an unseen observer able to trace the ‘deviants’ who refuse to do the work.  It makes those unwilling to work more apparent and therefore more able to be subjected by the system allowing the class oppression and removal of enemies.  The only way to end this omnipresent possibility to is to erase its presence.

1. 8th Grade Final Exam, Salina, KS: 1895. “4.Define Verse, Stanza, and Paragraph.” “8. Name events connected with the following dates: 1607, 1620, 1800, 1849, [and] 1865.” “3. What are the following, and give examples of each: Trigraph, subvocals, diphthong, cognate letters, [and] linguals?” “5. Name and describe the following: Monrovia, Odessa, Denver, Manitoba, Hecla, Yukon, St. Helena, Juan Fermandez, Aspinwall and Orinoco.” and “5. Give some general directions that you think would be beneficial to preserve the human body in a state of health.” All of the questions asked to recall information or demonstrate a specific skill like marking diacritics on words rather than provide analysis or opinion.
2. Bok, Edward. A National Crime at the Feet of American Parents.  Ladies Home Journal. 1901. 
3. Královec, Etta and John Buell. The End of Homework: How Homework Disrupts Families, Overburdens Children, and Limits Learning. Boston: Beacon Press, 2000. p. 45 “…homework was attacked as an illicit extension of the working day by those who viewed schoolwork as labor.”
4.  Buell, John.  Closing the Book on Homework. P.44 Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2004.  “Coming as it did just a year after the launch of Sputnik, the National Defense Education Act (NDEA) sought to strengthen math and science education… Requiring students to do more math homework was a major cultural and curricular emphasis.”
5.  “CIA World Factbook”. Central Intelligence Agency. https://www.cia.gov/library/publication … os/us.html Retrieved March 1st, 2009. Entry “United States of America.”
6. Královec, Etta and John Buell. The End of Homework: How Homework Disrupts Families, Overburdens Children, and Limits Learning. Boston: Beacon Press, 2000. p. 62
7. Foucault, Michel. Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. NY: Vintage Books, 1995. “We know the principle on which [the Panopticon] was based: at the periphery, an annular building; at the centre, a tower; this tower is pierced with wide windows that open onto the inner side of the ring; the peripheric building is divided into cells, each of which extends the whole width of the building; they have two windows, one on the inside, corresponding to the windows of the tower; the other, on the outside, allows the light to cross the cell from one end to the other. All that is needed, then, is to place a supervisor in a central tower and to shut up in each cell a madman, a patient, a condemned man, a worker or a schoolboy. By the effect of backlighting, one can observe from the tower, standing out precisely against the light, the small captive shadows in the cells of the periphery. They are like so many cages, so many small theatres, in which each actor is alone, perfectly individualized and constantly visible. The panoptic mechanism arranges spatial unities that make it possible to see constantly and to recognize immediately. In short, it reverses the principle of the dungeon; or rather of its three functions - to enclose, to deprive of light and to hide - it preserves only the first and eliminates the other two. Full lighting and the eye of a supervisor capture better than darkness, which ultimately protected. Visibility is a trap.”
8. Hasan, Shaheen. “Raising Kids, Not Running Schools, is Top Priority New Survey Shows Agreement on Most Urgent Type of Parental Involvement.” Public Agenda. March 17, 1999.  March 7, 2009. http://www.publicagenda.org/press-relea … nvolvement “Playing Their Parts finds that eight in 10 parents (83 percent) say the most important role they can play is checking homework and encouraging their children to learn”
9. Foucault as qtd. in Stone, Dan. Biopower and Modern Genocide. Empire, Colony, Genocide: Conquest, Occupation, and Subaltern Resistance in World History. Ed. Dirk A. Moses.  London: Berghahn Books, 2008.
10. Bareth, Karl and Alfred Vogel. Erblehre und Rassenkunde für die Grund- und Hauptschule 2nd edition. Bühl-Baden: Verlag Konkordia, 1937. Trans. Randall Bytwerk, 2009. Hosted  at http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/ … htm
11.
Fink, Fritz.  Die Judenfrage im Unterricht. Nuremberg: Stürmerverlag, 1937.  Trans. by Randall Bytwerk, 2001. Hosted at http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/fink.htm
12. Johns, Emily.  “Homework isn’t done? It’s OK at Hazel Park” Star Tribune. 18 February 2009, local- St. Paul ed.

I'll post more in the future. Please comment and tell me what you think.

 

Posted Mar 17, '09 at 10:44pm

necromancer

necromancer

641 posts

The image.
Hope it works this time.

http://i415.photobucket.com/albums/pp231/necromancerlord/stpattysday.jpg?t=1237344027

 

Posted Mar 17, '09 at 10:55pm

nichodemus

nichodemus

11,851 posts

Knight

Copy to notepad, rewrite all ' or '' punctuations. Also, rewrite ... if you use it. AG can't read these signs or some symbols. Like the symbols in French words.

 

Posted Mar 17, '09 at 11:21pm

necromancer

necromancer

641 posts

Without evil symbols:

On Homework:  Changes in the politics of education during the twentieth century

I. The early modern homework system

Just before the turn of the twentieth century students were provided a single task by schools: to remember.  They were instructed to rote-memorize the facts, no more, no less.  Tests demanded facts, analysis and insight was not needed, only recall.  They were asked for definitions, dates, and cities but not understanding [1].   The mind served as a vessel, it was a means to contain.  It functioned not on its own but instead as part of the body.  The matter of importance in educational life was the child as a whole rather than their intellect alone.  Edward Bok waged a war against homework on the grounds it caused a great number of maladies: stress, eye strain, acne, sleeplessness, violence, physical ailments, and spinal deformities [2]. He focused his ire on acts that injured the body, not the mind, decrying "the national crime" of excessive "brain work."  Such rhetoric even persuaded the state of California to pass a law banning homework.  What was perceived as valuable wasn't the child's education but the condition of their working body.  The children's identity as a machine converged with the machines they worked.  Indeed, education came to a convergence with industrialized economy.
Manufacturers, seeking cheaper child labor aroused fury against homework to end it.  After school duties, children were freed to work.  It provided a convenient place of control, a way to ensure that laborers would be healthy and strong.  While the opposite also was true, homework merged with other work in some critics' arguments to end it, claiming that it was in violation of child labor laws [3]. Throughout the era, it was firstly a means of work and an ends towards work, even as simple memorization.
It was secondly a crude method of class control through surveillance.  The teacher's gaze directly over student.  She would order them work and they would comply.  Those who did not would see little hope of escaping the worker class.  The teacher would ensure of that.  Not memorizing, the dates and the arbitrarium of material caused one to be labeled a "bad subject."  They were not fit for higher work, they were not fit for higher 'education,' and hence, they failed the examinations.  The poor could not afford to have their students do their schoolwork though, horror stories flood from the Progressivists telling of the child labor. After school, their children worked.  Maybe as a 'newsie' in the street, as a paper flower maker in a home workshop, or a canning machine operator- the system left them bereft of opportunities to advance.
II. The technological system.
In the 1960s the system progressed out of the "progressive system."  As the Russian rockets went up so did the American homework load to encourage students to match their communist counter-parts.  In 1958 the National Defense Education Act was passed.  It strongly encouraged the school system to adopt greater amounts of homework in mathematics and science [4].    No longer simple arithmetic and basic knowledge, students were encouraged to explore the functions of math and science in algebra, conic geometry, and trigonometry or physics and the growing study of evolution.
Homework progressed to studying the 'absolute arts', those of science and math; where before the goal was to learn the answer. It was now to find the answer.  The students were encouraged to analyze and follow methods of deduction.  How else were they to arrive at the solution to the problem or the scientific conclusion?  The aesthetique homework appealed to was now analysis, a closed analysis.  The scribbling of pencils on paper here becomes a moment of prestidigitation.  The scrawling hand is told to trick the mind into believing that it is now finding its own way, but always arrives at the same conclusion. Hence the state now has the power to tell its pupils its truth, its version of reality.  School can be used as an institution to encourage the people to act for the nation, by inserting that as a "truth" of existence. It may tell people of its ideal political reality to prevent its questioning.
The earlier methods of class control were augmented by the new system of homework.  However, instead of seeking out who was wealthy and who was not, it was designed to redesign the classes to its own liking.  It was a matter of who would carry out the steps to solve the problem and reach the truth.  Only those who could be taken into the truth and also have the aptitude in math and science were allowed to achieve. Chosen to lead the future of society they were also the most taken by the grasp of the old, they did as it commanded.  Political power in the hands of knowledge and status was meant to be carried on to the next generation.  Those who didn't make the grade were consigned to position of the blue collar worker in the industrial nation, while those who did were given authority over them as the engineers and managers.  Not only did they have power over the lower class but they had knowledge over them changing the way work by creating new technologies.

III.  The modern homework of servility

The politics of homework, so rooted in the industrial process, underwent a re-stitching of their fabric as the underlying economic conditions changed.  The era of industrial production changed to one of service [5].  Twenty three percent of the economy manufactures and forty one percent is service, the old system can not function.  Instead the system focuses on creating a populace acclimated to the service economy.
Homework loads are still increasing [6]. However their goal has shifted from an emphasis on math and science to language and communications. The recent No Child Left Behind Act called for an increase in language arts skills on standardized tests; foreign language programs are gaining popularity, many universities are requiring several years of them to enter.  The point of such programs is to increase the communication skills necessary for  service jobs, likewise homework in such areas has dramatically increased.
Focus now shifts to the analysis inherent of language.  Within this analysis however, the student still is always ushered to a sempiternal conclusion by the questions asked of them.  The author is seen as the center of authority.  Even in the open ended world of writing there is a right and a wrong.  No longer as direct, the system gains efficiency through its own subliminality.  In a world where power can never be felt as a certainty the student learns to accept its ever-persistent growth and surveillance of him.
  Following earlier traditions homework still seeks at its core a way to oppress that which the state deems "undesirable."  In the latest mutation it does this through a new network of power.  The sociality expressed in the needs of service demands such networks.  The teacher serves as the highest administrator of power.  The center of the Panopticon is initially the teacher [7].  She gains a superior knowledge of the students, who does their work, and more importantly who does not; who is intelligent, and who is not; who is good tempered and who is not; who is the ideal student, and who is not.  The central construction then gyrates out to the students who also gain an intimate knowledge of each other in the same regards.  They are set out to do group work, review each other's work and so on.  This serves to both allow the teacher access to view their social compatibility and the students to gain control over each other. It ensures that they are ensnared from the beginning into a system of automatic functioning of the power.  The effects become permanent. A perpetual feel of power from either the teacher or the student.  Another system flourishes too with the parent as the 'visible viewer.' They hold direct authority to punish the student for failing marks.  While the power may not have the same coercive properties of hidden power it makes obvious the danger of betraying those with power.  It serves as a companion to the hidden.  It makes serious their threats.  However, it also betrays this power to encourage the students own support of authority, eighty-three percent of parents believe the most important role in education they have is to check homework [8].  The power to destroy is hidden by the power to help.  Creating a state of both love and fear ensuring the citizen's subjection to the state.  Within this sphere of surveillance and subjection the state has the powers necessary to locate that which it deems undesirable via the watching eyes of the teacher.

IV. Genocide

Throughout these time periods the state has exercised its power to control classes and repress the 'undesirable.'  The system has gained much efficiency and enabled an imminent ability to wield the power of homework.  It grants the ability to control the details of a student's life: passing, free-time, and ideas.  When the state has the ability to determine what the lives of its citizens are it has the ability to determine if its citizens have lives.  It can determine what is undesirable and it can determine to expunge that.  Genocidal imperialism is given a foothold within the grounds of homework.  Foucault said, "If genocide is indeed the dream of modern powers, this is not because of a return of the ancient right to kill; it is because power is situated and exercised at the level of life, the species, the race, and the large-scale phenomena of the population." [9]  All of these can be seen in the current regime of homework, the ability to know and control the details of a students life, what is 'desirable,' and the interaction of the population with the world and economy.
This is also present in historical examples of the genocide that homework causes.  A German textbook on biology from 1937 begins a chapter thus "We have come to the following understanding: 1. Nature's laws of heredity are undeniably true.  All living creatures, humans included, are subject to these laws. 2. Humans are not equal, but rather of differing races.  The drives and strengths that create cultures are rooted in the race's genes.  Our race too has a racial inheritance and a culture that grows out of it.  We must fight for it!... The success and final victory of this great task depends: - on the law of selection - on the elimination of those with hereditary illness - on the promotion of genetically strong bloodlines - on maintaining purity of blood." [10] and "The racial and Jewish Question is the central problem of the National Socialist worldview. Solving this problem will ensure the survival of National Socialism and thereby the survival of our people for all time." [11] Here we can see what is 'desirable' and what is not, along with the influence on a student's perception and ideas, and the attitude towards what makes the population best off. When an education system is based on these systems it is always prepared to serve such violent ends.

V. Solution

The most immediate and effective solution is a complete dismantling of homework system.  Without that institution the growth of destructive cycles may slowed.  Others disagree and opt for making homework "not count." [12] Yet this will not solve problem, in fact, it may make it worse.  It will veil the teacher's power without it affecting grades; instead the teacher is even more of an unseen observer able to trace the 'deviants' who refuse to do the work.  It makes those unwilling to work more apparent and therefore more able to be subjected by the system allowing the class oppression and removal of enemies.  The only way to end this omnipresent possibility to is to erase its presence.

1. 8th Grade Final Exam, Salina, KS: 1895. "4.Define Verse, Stanza, and Paragraph." "8. Name events connected with the following dates: 1607, 1620, 1800, 1849, [and] 1865." "3. What are the following, and give examples of each: Trigraph, subvocals, diphthong, cognate letters, [and] linguals?" "5. Name and describe the following: Monrovia, Odessa, Denver, Manitoba, Hecla, Yukon, St. Helena, Juan Fermandez, Aspinwall and Orinoco." and "5. Give some general directions that you think would be beneficial to preserve the human body in a state of health." All of the questions asked to recall information or demonstrate a specific skill like marking diacritics on words rather than provide analysis or opinion.
2. Bok, Edward. A National Crime at the Feet of American Parents.  Ladies Home Journal. 1901.
3. Královec, Etta and John Buell. The End of Homework: How Homework Disrupts Families, Overburdens Children, and Limits Learning. Boston: Beacon Press, 2000. p. 45 "...homework was attacked as an illicit extension of the working day by those who viewed schoolwork as labor."
4.  Buell, John.  Closing the Book on Homework. P.44 Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2004.  "Coming as it did just a year after the launch of Sputnik, the National Defense Education Act (NDEA) sought to strengthen math and science education... Requiring students to do more math homework was a major cultural and curricular emphasis."
5.  "CIA World Factbook". Central Intelligence Agency. https://www.cia.gov/library/publication … os/us.html Retrieved March 1st, 2009. Entry "United States of America."
6. Kralovec, Etta and John Buell. The End of Homework: How Homework Disrupts Families, Overburdens Children, and Limits Learning. Boston: Beacon Press, 2000. p. 62
7. Foucault, Michel. Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. NY: Vintage Books, 1995. "We know the principle on which [the Panopticon] was based: at the periphery, an annular building; at the centre, a tower; this tower is pierced with wide windows that open onto the inner side of the ring; the peripheric building is divided into cells, each of which extends the whole width of the building; they have two windows, one on the inside, corresponding to the windows of the tower; the other, on the outside, allows the light to cross the cell from one end to the other. All that is needed, then, is to place a supervisor in a central tower and to shut up in each cell a madman, a patient, a condemned man, a worker or a schoolboy. By the effect of backlighting, one can observe from the tower, standing out precisely against the light, the small captive shadows in the cells of the periphery. They are like so many cages, so many small theatres, in which each actor is alone, perfectly individualized and constantly visible. The panoptic mechanism arranges spatial unities that make it possible to see constantly and to recognize immediately. In short, it reverses the principle of the dungeon; or rather of its three functions - to enclose, to deprive of light and to hide - it preserves only the first and eliminates the other two. Full lighting and the eye of a supervisor capture better than darkness, which ultimately protected. Visibility is a trap."
8. Hasan, Shaheen. "Raising Kids, Not Running Schools, is Top Priority New Survey Shows Agreement on Most Urgent Type of Parental Involvement." Public Agenda. March 17, 1999.  March 7, 2009. http://www.publicagenda.org/press-relea … nvolvement "Playing Their Parts finds that eight in 10 parents (83 percent) say the most important role they can play is checking homework and encouraging their children to learn"
9. Foucault as qtd. in Stone, Dan. Biopower
10. Bareth, Karl and Alfred Vogel. and Modern Genocide. Empire, Colony, Genocide: Conquest, Occupation, and Subaltern Resistance in World History. Ed. Dirk A. Moses.  London: Berghahn Books, 2008.
10. Bareth, Karl and Alfred Vogel. Erblehre und Rassenkunde für die Grund- und Hauptschule 2nd edition. Bühl-Baden: Verlag Konkordia, 1937. Trans. Randall Bytwerk, 2009. Hosted  at http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/ … htm
11. Fink, Fritz.  Die Judenfrage im Unterricht. Nuremberg: Stürmerverlag, 1937.  Trans. by Randall Bytwerk, 2001. Hosted at http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/fink.htm
12.
Johns, Emily.  "Homework isn't done? It's OK at Hazel Park" Star Tribune. 18 February 2009, local- St. Paul ed.

 

Posted Mar 18, '09 at 4:20pm

necromancer

necromancer

641 posts

@yioup~

1) I do display a clear opinion in the picture i.e. I dislike the tradition of pinching those who don't wear green.

2) The essay is actually being satirical of debaters who take perfectly good writings such as those of Michel Foucault, Nietzsche, Arendt, etc. and link the entire topic to genocide. Its annoying, stupid, and somewhat insulting to victims of genocide; I understand the ways that Foucault/ Arendt/ Agamben link things to genocide and discuss it in conjunction with other functions of a powerful state, but debaters make up bs to do so.  However, without in-text references to debate, it is also just to be funny and random.

3) The poem was just exploring how to write in a different voice and mood.

4) You have included no internal logic to what you say making it nothing more than an opinion.

5) Wikipedia has a lot of opinionated articles.

6) I don't have a sixth thing to say... I kind of assumed you were joking as per 4.

 

Posted Mar 25, '09 at 8:57pm

necromancer

necromancer

641 posts

http://i415.photobucket.com/albums/pp231/necromancerlord/planetscreationorcollapse.jpg?t=1238028448
Planets, disbandment or allies?

Oh, and it would be nice if you commented on anything, its helpful to know what people like.

 

Posted Mar 26, '09 at 6:43am

kingryan

kingryan

4,165 posts

I like the T-shirt it made me laugh,
And now I have to take a bath.
Because I did wee my pants,
And I will now end my rants.

The balls above make me wonder,
The came down and stole my thunder.
Enter these into a competition,
And then you will fulfill the mission.

 

Posted Mar 26, '09 at 6:45am

Riou1231

Riou1231

1,522 posts

The T-Shirt thing made me laugh!

Green
Can't Pinch This

It was very very hilarious! And those poems are good man ever considered becoming a poet?

 

Posted Mar 26, '09 at 8:36pm

necromancer

necromancer

641 posts

http://i415.photobucket.com/albums/pp231/necromancerlord/lostworlds.jpg?t=1238110024
Lost Worlds. These are easy and fun to make :)

Thanks KR, I liked your poem, lol.

Riou, thanks, but no, I don't want to be a poet, very few are wealthy. :P

 

Posted Mar 28, '09 at 3:04pm

necromancer

necromancer

641 posts

http://i415.photobucket.com/albums/pp231/necromancerlord/eclipse-1.jpg?t=1238266767
Syzygy.

 
Reply to some random writing and art of mine~ necromancer

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