ForumsWEPRTeaching Through Video Games

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Somewhat49
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Somewhat49
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I've seen how people train dogs by giving them treats after saying a word and making them sit then giving them a treat. I've also noticed how I am trained to raise my hand and sit down after entering a classroom and I recieve a good grade for doing that, so I continue. (except in this case, the good grade is always rewarded unlike the treat)
My question is, do you think video games could be used to teach things like that also? And if you think it can then do you think that you can make it so they use the lesson in real life as well.

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cablecar1
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cablecar1
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Palaptine, why don't you just have kids test those things out in real life? :P

Dannydaninja
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Dannydaninja
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Video games are already teaching us!

A MMORPG called Runescape helped me in art, where you can mix buckets of paints to get new colors ( red + blue = purple etc. ) for different coloured capes.

Also video games have helped me enormously in my English, with my vocabulary.

Oh and I know that if I'm ever attacked by some guy with a knife I need to grab his hand and whack it against a wall, then if I am going to stab the guy, I need to stab and twist.

loloynage2
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loloynage2
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What game designers need to do is make games, that teach, for the older kids to have fun with.

I think they should do whatever they want to. That's how art becomes art. Also an other piece of argument is that some (probably not the mainstream ones) video games are pretty astonishing in the domain of art. How about that? What art was all about, enjoyement and cultural knowledge.
A MMORPG called Runescape helped me in art, where you can mix buckets of paints to get new colors ( red + blue = purple etc. ) for different coloured capes.

Is this supose to be impressive?
Oh and I know that if I'm ever attacked by some guy with a knife I need to grab his hand and whack it against a wall, then if I am going to stab the guy, I need to stab and twist.

I'm sure video games also trained to you to have the mental and physical mesures to deal with that situation.
Somewhat49
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Somewhat49
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I think an Imax style Final Destination-esque safety game would teach some life lessons. Perhaps if you fail to physically turn your head to look both ways and make sure it's safe before crossing the street, your character gets hit by a bus (blood settings could be switched off for when kids play) and you start over. You're baking something in the oven. If you try to take it out without equipping an oven mitt, you get badly burned (although that's kind of something you need to feel yourself to truly understand why touching something extremely hot is a bad thing. Maybe you get shocked on the hand in real life?). If you take something without physically asking politely first, you get shocked in the hand (or maybe the controler vibrates, but that's boring).

I think if you just have it look realistic enough, you wont have to turn your head, like I discovered that you could do the best in a game if you look at the screen like you are actualy in the game, also when you play a game almost 100% of your focus is on the game so it's almost like it is real.
Also I know alot of studies where if you just link a fake hand or something to someone's mind, then every impact they will artificialy feel.
Somewhat49
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Somewhat49
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Video games are already teaching us!
A MMORPG called Runescape helped me in art, where you can mix buckets of paints to get new colors ( red + blue = purple etc. ) for different coloured capes.
Also video games have helped me enormously in my English, with my vocabulary.
Oh and I know that if I'm ever attacked by some guy with a knife I need to grab his hand and whack it against a wall, then if I am going to stab the guy, I need to stab and twist.

Please read the first topic post before you think you know everything just from reading the title... I really think I would have been better off if I just left the title blank.
Somewhat49
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Somewhat49
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think they should do whatever they want to. That's how art becomes art. Also an other piece of argument is that some (probably not the mainstream ones) video games are pretty astonishing in the domain of art. How about that? What art was all about, enjoyement and cultural knowledge.

I actualy really like art games (not painting, art games are like games that display a concept in life), the only problem is they can't be set as mainstream since they can't rake in revenue since they are never longer than 15 minutes. Another problem is that there really is no ONE site where art games are, so they are spread out among a million websites.
Somewhat49
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Somewhat49
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I think an Imax style Final Destination-esque safety game would teach some life lessons. Perhaps if you fail to physically turn your head to look both ways and make sure it's safe before crossing the street, your character gets hit by a bus (blood settings could be switched off for when kids play) and you start over. You're baking something in the oven. If you try to take it out without equipping an oven mitt, you get badly burned (although that's kind of something you need to feel yourself to truly understand why touching something extremely hot is a bad thing. Maybe you get shocked on the hand in real life?). If you take something without physically asking politely first, you get shocked in the hand (or maybe the controler vibrates, but that's boring).

You're saying that you should censor the blood for kids, or have a vibrating conroller, in the fairy tales used to teach morales to kids they didn't censor. The red shoes, the little mermaid? They were all quite grusome and I think that if you had the NPC yell at yu or something everytime you didn't ask politley or have ur hands in the game get badly burned and have it scream, you would get the point without any fancy vibrations.
xfirealchemistx
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xfirealchemistx
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I know I wouldn't want to learn through a video game. If you want someone to learn give them a book. Education video games is just a gimmick parents are pushing for.

EmperorPalpatine
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EmperorPalpatine
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If you want someone to learn give them a book.

What does a book give more than a different form of media?
Somewhat49
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Somewhat49
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I know I wouldn't want to learn through a video game. If you want someone to learn give them a book. Education video games is just a gimmick parents are pushing for.

Please read the OP before posting next time
stephenking
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I think they could, possibly, make educational video games. However, it's also straying from the whole idea of entertainment that video games make.

Somewhat49
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Somewhat49
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I think they could, possibly, make educational video games. However, it's also straying from the whole idea of entertainment that video games make.

I think your binding teaching with school in your mind, by teaching I mean teaching people basic things like don't pick up a hot plate without gloves(courtesy of emperor) or don't cross the street without looking both ways.

I think that if you taught just basic stuff and not school stuff the game would still be fun.
Somewhat49
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Somewhat49
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What game designers need to do is make games, that teach, for the older kids to have fun with.

You still haven't got my idea, think of it this way, when a misquito drops onto your skin, you immedietly brush it off or squish it right? What I want to do is take the thing that makes you squish the mosquito without much thought put into it, and put that into video games, or a clearer example could be when people in a bad neighborhood hear a bang that's loud, they will instinctivley drop to the ground, agian with not much thought put into it.

If you try to take it out without equipping an oven mitt, you get badly burned (although that's kind of something you need to feel yourself to truly understand why touching something extremely hot is a bad thing. Maybe you get shocked on the hand in real life?). If you take something without physically asking politely first, you get shocked in the hand (or maybe the controler vibrates, but that's boring).

have you ever watched a movie and someone in the movie falls hard or something and you could actualy feel about what the character must've felt? You could always go with trying to give that sensation when the character gets burned, or you could go the fairytale way (the old ones) and have the person's hand get so badly burnt that it starts to bleed and the chacter is screaming in pain so that image will always be connected to burning stove.
Also if you really wanted to get the point across you could have people appear around your character and have them point and laugh at him burning, but I think that would catagorize immedietly as mental torture especialy since minds of younglings are easily affected (not exactly proven, but it's plausable)
Palaptine, why don't you just have kids test those things out in real life? :P

Okay I really feel a bit offended by that statement..
44Flames
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44Flames
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I've seen how people train dogs by giving them treats after saying a word and making them sit then giving them a treat. I've also noticed how I am trained to raise my hand and sit down after entering a classroom and I recieve a good grade for doing that, so I continue. (except in this case, the good grade is always rewarded unlike the treat)
My question is, do you think video games could be used to teach things like that also? And if you think it can then do you think that you can make it so they use the lesson in real life as well.


I highly doubt a video game could train a dog. The dog wouldn't look at the screen.
Somewhat49
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Somewhat49
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I highly doubt a video game could train a dog. The dog wouldn't look at the screen.

I'm not actualy trying to train the dog throug video games, i'm staying strictly to people since from my experience animals don't relaly connect to screens like we do and notice how i say you are giving them treats, which are physical things when grades are completly virtual so it really is another example on how we connect to screens and virtual things alot better than other animals. To try to get back to what I was saying, I was just using the dog and treat as an example as what I want videogames to do, teach someone something by giving them treats (non educational stuff, respectivley) and then be able to take away the video game and still have those people carry out what was taught in the game.
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