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[necro]Do you have any questions to ask a Chinese?

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Posted Nov 11, '11 at 10:29am

nichodemus

nichodemus

13,299 posts

Knight

How do you feel about all that easily cured cancer that you get from the factory pollution around? Has China even tried stopping or controlling it?


Can't actually answer from the POV of an actual PRC citizen. But it was extremely bad on my lungs even living in Beijing for a while for me. Even in the city area, the smog can sometimes tingle your eyes and induce cough.

Well if they do, we won't be able to feed our consumer habits will we?
 

Posted Nov 11, '11 at 10:32am

loco5

loco5

16,326 posts

Well if they do, we won't be able to feed our consumer habits will we?


so what, you'd rather die at 40 with cancer, knowing you have that 50 inch plazma screen tv, or those new designer clothes?
 

Posted Nov 11, '11 at 10:40am

nichodemus

nichodemus

13,299 posts

Knight

so what, you'd rather die at 40 with cancer, knowing you have that 50 inch plazma screen tv, or those new designer clothes?


I'm not in a position to actually push the Chinese government for anything. I'm merely stating a bland neutral and objective point that the smog is a result of our consumer habits.
 

Posted Nov 11, '11 at 10:51am

AgathaB

AgathaB

154 posts

so what, you'd rather die at 40 with cancer, knowing you have that 50 inch plazma screen tv, or those new designer clothes?


Ad hominem is really not the way to go in a discussion such as this. Precisely for the reason Nichodemus stated.

If someone would be willing to answer a question for me, that would be marvelous. How prevalent is the mindset of pushing children to extremes in regards to school work and the like? We always hear about gifted, hard working Chinese children and parents who push them to be like that (curiously, almost always from a negative point of view), but exactly how many Chinese do this? Is it a personal choice, or more of a social more?

I've read a bit on the subject, but that was ages ago and some perspective would be appreciated.
 

Posted Nov 11, '11 at 11:11am

nichodemus

nichodemus

13,299 posts

Knight

If someone would be willing to answer a question for me, that would be marvelous. How prevalent is the mindset of pushing children to extremes in regards to school work and the like? We always hear about gifted, hard working Chinese children and parents who push them to be like that (curiously, almost always from a negative point of view), but exactly how many Chinese do this? Is it a personal choice, or more of a social more?


Both, though the image of all students being highly motivated is false. I spent a fortnight as an exchange student in one of the top schools of Wuhan province and I met quite a few who would happily skip class for WoW. On the other hand yes, the typical stereotype of a hardworking cookie cutter student does prevail in the vast majority. Much of what I see in their class doesn't encourage creativity but memorization with an emphasis on recitation though this is starting to be pushed back.

Also, back in Singapore I have many classmates who are PRC scholars; most are hardworking and studious to the point of having no life, on the other hand there are extremes who can't control their urges for computer games.

So in conclusion you mainly get two extremes, on one hand the really really hardworking majority, and a tiny minority that plays day and night ( a result of being driven up the wall maybe?). I didn't see many in betweens there.

I guess it's the product of a one-child policy partially, since the future of the family is on the burden of one child. A good education at the elementary level leads to a good high school, which leads to a good university....you can see where this is going. With millions struggling to break the poverty cycle you can imagine the huge stress. I have heard horror stories of students buying cans of pure oxygen to stay alert, mothers forcing daughters to take pills stopping their periods and students bringing in sophisticated ear phones and button cameras to check up on papers which professors outside will answer.

But one must not forget that it too is part of Chinese culture (Confucius' impact is strong) to be diligent and toil away. It's deeply ingrained in all of us. Even as a third generation Singaporean, (I sadly consider myself much more Western in thinking than Oriental looking) this cultural spirit is still deep in me. I remember spending hours everyday as a child of ten studying away; doing badly might end in a caning or beating.

During the SARS outbreak as you remember in 2003 when I was....nine I think, when school was shut, my mother forced me to study up to ten hours daily.

Does that help?
 

Posted Nov 11, '11 at 11:31am

AgathaB

AgathaB

154 posts

Much of what I see in their class doesn't encourage creativity but memorization with an emphasis on recitation though this is starting to be pushed back.


Yes, that fits in with what I heard/read. Although I am saddened by the apparent lack of creativity, I can understand the emphasis in a culture such as this one. Also, this:

I guess it's the product of a one-child policy partially, since the future of the family is on the burden of one child. A good education at the elementary level leads to a good high school, which leads to a good university....you can see where this is going. With millions struggling to break the poverty cycle you can imagine the huge stress.


is an extremely valid point. I imagine there's quite a lot hanging on a child's future, not the least of which their continued survival.

So in conclusion you mainly get two extremes, on one hand the really really hardworking majority, and a tiny minority that plays day and night ( a result of being driven up the wall maybe?). I didn't see many in betweens there.


Which might be better than either of the extremes, obviously. Perhaps that's something the Chinese should strive for, although it seems difficult to change, what with the point about poverty mentioned earlier.

But one must not forget that it too is part of Chinese culture (Confucius' impact is strong) to be diligent and toil away. It's deeply ingrained in all of us. Even as a third generation Singaporean, (I sadly consider myself much more Western in thinking than Oriental looking) this cultural spirit is still deep in me. I remember spending hours everyday as a child of ten studying away; doing badly might end in a caning or beating.


I have always been amazed by how deep the culture lingers in emigrated Chinese; it never seemed to me as though other cultures cling onto their traditions as strongly. Maybe I'm wrong about this, but it's the general feeling I get. It might make a point about my own character, since I'm pretty quick to adapt and feel I'd be much happier living someplace else. (Probably Mars. I'd be really happy on Mars.)

Does that help?


Yes. Yes, it does. Thanks for the prompt answer.
 

Posted Nov 11, '11 at 11:37am

nichodemus

nichodemus

13,299 posts

Knight

Yes, that fits in with what I heard/read. Although I am saddened by the apparent lack of creativity, I can understand the emphasis in a culture such as this one. Also, this:


I was pretty shocked as well during their history lesson when they recited anecdotes. That's the primary level, I had yet to see their high schools' history lessons though from what I hear, it isn't much better.

Which might be better than either of the extremes, obviously. Perhaps that's something the Chinese should strive for, although it seems difficult to change, what with the point about poverty mentioned earlier.


All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy!~

I have always been amazed by how deep the culture lingers in emigrated Chinese; it never seemed to me as though other cultures cling onto their traditions as strongly.


Pretty amazed now I think about it. It's a lot to do with the parents too, who aren't as lax as (stereotype ahead!) Western parents in general. When a kid grows up, naturally he does apply such parenting skills on his too I guess.

Oh, just to add. At that time my parents also forced me into at least three separate tuition lessons outside of school per week, and five competitive swimming sessions a week for two hours at a time. Nearly a third of us have been forced into learning one instrument or another too. All in a bid to improve ourselves. Hardcore to say the least!

(Probably Mars. I'd be really happy on Mars.)


Won't you get lonely there?
 

Posted Nov 11, '11 at 11:45am

AgathaB

AgathaB

154 posts

Pretty amazed now I think about it. It's a lot to do with the parents too, who aren't as lax as (stereotype ahead!) Western parents in general. When a kid grows up, naturally he does apply such parenting skills on his too I guess.


It's a cycle that's not easily broken. Especially since most immigrants (regardless of what culture they come from) tend to live surrounded by other immigrants from their area and thus are really not as exposed to whatever culture they find themselves in as they might be if they lived directly surrounded by the natives.

Oh, just to add. At that time my parents also forced me into at least three separate tuition lessons outside of school per week, and five competitive swimming sessions a week for two hours at a time. Nearly a third of us have been forced into learning one instrument or another too. All in a bid to improve ourselves. Hardcore to say the least!


Hardcore, yes. But then, not very different from my experience, although I pushed most of my extracurricular activity on myself. During the first four years of schooling alone, I had music school, German and Italian, plus an independent choir and volleyball training. Today, I can't stand not having anything to do, it drives me insane.

Won't you get lonely there?


As long as they install Internet on Mars, I'll be fine. I don't really socialize much as it is. Practically the only person I'd want to take with me is my brother.
 

Posted Nov 11, '11 at 11:50am

nichodemus

nichodemus

13,299 posts

Knight

Hardcore, yes. But then, not very different from my experience, although I pushed most of my extracurricular activity on myself. During the first four years of schooling alone, I had music school, German and Italian, plus an independent choir and volleyball training. Today, I can't stand not having anything to do, it drives me insane.


That's good Pushing oneself makes living worthwhile.

As long as they install Internet on Mars, I'll be fine. I don't really socialize much as it is. Practically the only person I'd want to take with me is my brother.


Hmpph. Bad connec-......
 

Posted Nov 11, '11 at 12:54pm

thepunisher93

thepunisher93

1,863 posts

NI HAO
I heared of this canton fare what is that?
More over what kind of education intitutes you have there for foreign students?