Forums

ForumsWorld Events, Politics, Religion, Etc.

Obama and the red states....

Posted Feb 18, '13 at 3:44pm

Vendablebow

Vendablebow

30 posts

Ok, I go to the University of South Carolina, and I had to conduct some interviews for an essay I am writing on Barack Obama and the not so good relationship with the red states (Republican Majority States.) One thing I found very shocking when interviewing many of my own family members, and others is that the thing that comes up the most in their anger spitting speeches on Obama is race. His race. Literally 85% of the interviews I conducted ended on the note well, "He is Black, so, what does he know about what we need." Other comments as well, that I cannot even post here lol...

My question and feel free to open debate is, Most of the people who do not like or agree with Obama or his policies tend to be White Males and Females between the ages of 37 and 64 in my study. Are these people just racist? and is this mostly the concensus on the Republican or Tea Party side of the argument?

 

Posted Feb 18, '13 at 3:56pm

Salvidian

Salvidian

4,299 posts

Are these people just racist?
]

Just a random guess, but a lot of southern states (like South Carolina) have a lot of deeply embedded roots in slavery. Perhaps their southern nationality is blocking their rationalism in terms of the political world? It's a long stretch, but i believe it's a valid point nonetheless.

Also, when speaking to the more republican side of my family, they often make jokes regarding Obama's ethnicity (for obvious reasons). You're sure they aren't simply joking?

and is this mostly the concensus on the Republican or Tea Party side of the argument?


Like my republican side of our family, I'd say they're probably just joking. That's not to say racism doesn't exist in the more conservative side of things, but it's unlikely.

Then again, you might just have an unusual family/one that has a lot of southern/conservative nationalism.

If I haven't lost you yet.
 

Posted Feb 18, '13 at 4:00pm

Vendablebow

Vendablebow

30 posts

Nope, it makes plenty of sense. Although 5 of the 15 I interviewed were not family members at all. And from my notes 7 of the 15 actually used the N word, as we were in a private setting and felt they could really have at it out they feel about it.

 

Posted Feb 18, '13 at 4:01pm

Vendablebow

Vendablebow

30 posts

the word out, should be how lol typo

 

Posted Feb 18, '13 at 4:03pm

Salvidian

Salvidian

4,299 posts

Nope, it makes plenty of sense. Although 5 of the 15 I interviewed were not family members at all. And from my notes 7 of the 15 actually used the N word, as we were in a private setting and felt they could really have at it out they feel about it.


Shouldn't have skimmed the OP then, haha.

Anyway, think about it. I mean, South Carolina just reminds me of slavery, which leads to racism towards blacks. It's probably just the southern nationalism that fuels their rage.
 

Posted Feb 18, '13 at 4:08pm

Vendablebow

Vendablebow

30 posts

^Right, I mean it was what I thought to. I would hate to have to conduct the same interview in Alabama or Louisiana haha.

Still at some point, I start asking the question, if these same interviews were conducted in Wyoming or Montana, would the outcome be the same?

 

Posted Feb 18, '13 at 4:12pm

Salvidian

Salvidian

4,299 posts

Still at some point, I start asking the question, if these same interviews were conducted in Wyoming or Montana, would the outcome be the same?


I live in Iowa, which is a swing state. It's pretty close to Wyoming in terms of geography and upbringings. We have problems with racism (the KKK was big in the 90's here) occasionally, but I can't image them being as prominent as a southern state. In the years of slavery, the northern states (or the union) were states that offered freedom for blacks, so we have a very different perspective on the current president overall. Now, I wouldn't say slavery is the prominent reason for racism, but it's probably a huge one that led to many other reasons.
 

Posted Feb 18, '13 at 4:47pm

Kasic

Kasic

5,750 posts

Still at some point, I start asking the question, if these same interviews were conducted in Wyoming or Montana, would the outcome be the same?


I think this is a sample size/selection error. How many people did you ask? If you polled people from one small community, chances are they share the same values and views.

Southern states, as has been already pointed out, have higher rates of discrimination towards minorities.
 

Posted Feb 18, '13 at 4:52pm

Salvidian

Salvidian

4,299 posts

I think this is a sample size/selection error. How many people did you ask? If you polled people from one small community, chances are they share the same values and views.


Ah, yeah. Didn't think about that.
 

Posted Feb 18, '13 at 5:57pm

Vendablebow

Vendablebow

30 posts

I think this is a sample size/selection error. How many people did you ask? If you polled people from one small community, chances are they share the same values and views.

Southern states, as has been already pointed out, have higher rates of discrimination towards minorities.


That is the point of my post and will be the point of my essay. Most of the southern United States is republican. So, if they discriminate against minorities, does that mean that all Republican's do so? Republican's in my opinion are a dying breed, from all I have seen, the 2008 an 2012 elections. The country is changing on a National Scale, and I have yet to meet one Republican yet who doesn't like Obama strictly for his policies, but yet either because they are racist, or are following the racist voters that elected him to that office.
 
Reply to Obama and the red states....

You must be logged in to post a reply!