Ukraine flag Armor Games stands with Ukraine Ukraine flag
If you’d like to help, please consider giving to Ukraine Crisis Fund

ForumsWEPRBrexit and the consequences...thoughts?

34 15593
Doombreed
offline
Doombreed
7,024 posts
Templar

As you are probably aware, the British Exit from the EU is a reality. With a scenario that is going to take place during the next 2 years, politicians, analysts and pretty much everyone else talks about a nightmare.

First of all, David Cameron is now resigning. Despite his earlier statement, in which he swore not to resign, regardless of the result of the referendum, his resignation is now more or less a fact.

The British pound is already at the lowest point since 1985 in comparison to the USD and the yen

The 'hole' left in the EU due to the British exit now has to be covered by the other member nations of the EU. I do not know about the direct repercussions in other countries but, Greece may have to offer an amount increased by 150 million Euros per year.

Additionally, Scotland and Northern Ireland are now re-examining the situation, considering leaving the UK. I do not know about the Welsh though.

Politicians in France and Italy also ask for this referendum to occur in their countries as well.

The leaders of the EU are meeting to assess the damage and put emergency plans in motion but all in all, the results of this are considered to be dire for all other member nations in the EU

What are your thoughts on this?

(P.S. Also, anyone who follows British politics more closely may officially consider themselves encouraged to drop by this thread and post his/her opinion I'd like to hear your thoughts on this more than anyone)

  • 34 Replies
nichodemus
offline
nichodemus
14,920 posts
Grand Duke

The Welsh wanted Brexit, they would stick with the UK. Not sure about those loveable fat aqua mammals though.

My thoughts are....Initial thoughts are blind panic as it's causing the global economy to tank. I'm not British, but my family has a business and any global economic dip is a blow. My more rational thoughts are that the actual exit will be years away, and that leaves all parties to enact contingency plans to soften the landing.

I do think Remain was the better choice, though that's from the viewpoint of an outsider. The Leave voters were mostly the older folk, people who will most likely not suffer any consequences, because like it or not, they'll all not be in this world by then. All elections are run on emotions, and the fear and hatemongering got the best of everyone on both sides. Native v Immigrants, Old v Young, Left v Right, Urban dwellers v Provincials, English v Scottish/Irish/Welsh, everything was fair game.

I wouldn't call it the mandate of the people when the vote was really rather equal. It's only sugarcoating to call it a democratic decision.

But most of all, you've got to feel for the Scottish. Voted to remain with the UK based on the false promise that the UK would provide a better vehicle into the EU. Now they're shanked less then two years later. Utter shambles.

PS The Leave campaign is now coming out to claim that the EU contribution money won't be spent on the NHS even though that was a huge selling point. Nor will immigration slow anytime soon. That was a pretty fast U-Turn.

Swarmlord2
offline
Swarmlord2
2,081 posts
Marquis

I am rather worried...

Doombreed
offline
Doombreed
7,024 posts
Templar

The Welsh wanted Brexit, they would stick with the UK. Not sure about those loveable fat aqua mammals though.

Right sorry about this. Typed it in a hurry. Edited it now

I do think Remain was the better choice, though that's from the viewpoint of an outsider.

That's my viewpoint too, exactly the reason I would like to hear the thoughts of someone on the inside.

The Leave voters were mostly the older folk, people who will most likely not suffer any consequences, because like it or not, they'll all not be in this world by then.

This is something I am having a hard time understanding. Cameron won the elections with a majority that left no doubt as to who was the people's choice (if it can be called that). A conservative politician who advocated for his country's stay in the EU won the elections clearly and yet now more than half of the voters (which are about 80% of the population) in the referendum voted for their country's exit from the EU. This change of heart came quite quickly.

All elections are run on emotions, and the fear and hatemongering got the best of everyone on both sides. Native v Immigrants, Old v Young, Left v Right, Urban dwellers v Provincials, English v Scottish/Irish/Welsh, everything was fair game.

Most definitely. That's why not knowing what was the political "game" in the UK means that we could not possibly predict the British people's emotions and reactions as outsiders.

But most of all, you've got to feel for the Scottish. Voted to remain with the UK based on the false promise that the UK would provide a better vehicle into the EU. Now they're shanked less then two years later. Utter shambles.

This is quite possibly the saddest political repercussion of the Brexit for me.

But most of all, I can see many advantages the British had as a member of the EU now gone. First of all, what will happen to all the citizens of the UK living and working abroad? We are talking about 1.3 million people approximately. For example the Health Insurance of all these people. So far they were covered by a deal that allowed the British System to take care of them in most countries while now, they may need a work permit to even have a health insurance.

Not to mention that the professional future of most of these is now uncertain. Without a dual citizenship, no one can tell what the future has in store for them.

Another thing is that some International organizations are considering reducing the amount of jobs in the UK. JPMorgan has already declared that it may fire up to 4 of its 16 thousand employees in the UK, Morgan Stanley 1000 out of 6000 and Goldman Sachs at least 1600.

The important thing though is that, as Greece is a member of the EU itself, then maybe our country is simply more heavily affected than we would like. The financial repercussions are probably going to hit us hard as we were relying on financial support from the EU both for the debt and for the resolution of the refugee crisis now more than ever. It may be that I am simply worried of the consequences in our economy, but I too feel that remaining in the EU was the best choice...

HahiHa
offline
HahiHa
8,212 posts
Regent

I do not know about Whales though.

I heard that Wales (not whales ) voted like England, contrary to Scotland and NI.

The EU had made promises to even more concessions in favour of the UK in return to staying in the EU; that this won't be the case now is probably the only aspect which I feel a certain relief about. Not that I am actually directly concerned, not by this; it's more the principle, and I am aware it is kind of a petty aspect to be relieved about.

I am of course disappointed by the vote, as I basically see it as a loose-loose situation for every involved party (and that's a lot of parties). Most of the arguments of the Brexit camp were either problematic, biased or just idealistic misrepresentations. I am the first to agree that there are issues with the EU, but leaving it is not going to solve them.
Now they face a tiresome two years of negotiations with the EU to try and limit the negative effects this will undoubtedly have, but after that they can finally be 'independent', whatever that means. However, I don't think they will be any more "free" than they are now.

The major reason why I personally dreaded the Brexit is for its impacts on international cooperation in the scientific branch and accessibility of places of study and funding opportunities. The situation is already not ideal but nonetheless viable. The Brexit will definitely have a strong negative influence on it, and I think it is highly regrettable.

Funny thing is, I see certain parallels between this vote and our February 9th, 2014 vote in Switzerland. The content is very different of course, but the way it all happened, the influence of participation, the impact of xenophobic arguments and denial of economic arguments is almost like a déjà-vu.

I hope there won't be a snowball effect among other EU member countries. There already is in some way, as you mentioned politicians in France and Italy already asking for referendums. That was predictable of course; I just hope the UK will be the only one to leave, and that the other members will see it as an incentive to reform the EU where needed, not dump it altogether.
nichodemus
offline
nichodemus
14,920 posts
Grand Duke

Well, I follow alot of people on Twitter if that counts for something. Most of the Londoners want in, and everyone outside just wants to leave.

Yes, but the Leave vote really only took off in the past few months. They were just the underdogs before that, but lots of fear-mongering and an intense media campaign really helped them. I don't think the influx of migrants and all the terror stories of ISIS helped as well.

I can already tell you what the people will say. They won't give a toss over those who work for banks or big corporations. Politics is very easy these days, just point to any rich fellow and claim they're all part of a big financial corporation conspiracy to trample on the working class. That is a surefire way to get votes on your side, simply by virtue of the age long anger at people who have more than you.

There's a Brexit voter now on the BBC (Or some other news outlet). He's shocked that the UK is leaving. Then why vote? I suspect that many didn't actually think it through. I don't see anything in the UK that can't be solved via good internal government. Now even Cameron is gone, and the man who got kicked out of London, the man whose family ancestry has Russians, French, Turks, Americans, but still harped on immigration, is the favourite to be the next PM.

Doombreed
offline
Doombreed
7,024 posts
Templar

I heard that Wales (not whales ) voted like England, contrary to Scotland and NI.

Please people I fixed it! This is the kind of thing that goes in one's work record so relent for my sake, I am begging you xD

Anyway, on topic, I read that too, but only after I finished the OP. Wales, half of NI and most of Great Britain voted for Brexit while Scotland, the other half of NI and London (like Nicho said) along with other parts of GB voted to remain in the EU.

I am of course disappointed by the vote, as I basically see it as a loose-loose situation for every involved party (and that's a lot of parties). Most of the arguments of the Brexit camp were either problematic, biased or just idealistic misrepresentations. I am the first to agree that there are issues with the EU, but leaving it is not going to solve them.

(If it's loose try hammering some nails into it...sorry. Couldn't resist xD mwahahah) Quite right. The severe issues with an international group of nations like the EU, of which the UK was one of the most prominent members, can only be solved from within. This also seems like somewhat "nihilistic" in a sense and self-centered. UK was one of the most capable members of the EU, if anyone could help solve the problems with it, it was England, along with a couple other prominent members. I understand that sentiment, especially anger can easily cloud one's judgement but this all seems like not caring about anyone else in a time where people must remain united. With the financial and political storm, leaving the EU seems like it can only make things worse on the global front.

I suspect that many didn't actually think it through. I don't see anything in the UK that can't be solved via good internal government. Now even Cameron is gone, and the man who got kicked out of London, the man whose family ancestry has Russians, French, Turks, Americans, but still harped on immigration, is the favourite to be the next PM.

You mean Nigel Farage? Yes, he was the first to take advantage of the political situation apparently, putting pressure on Cameron immediately. Didn't waste any time. *sigh*...It's almost sad at this point.

Update: I've been informed that the Scottish PM has just asked for a referendum on whether to remain in the UK or not though I haven't been able to verify this just yet. ON the one hand, I get his reaction, like Nicho pointed out, that's why Scotland in the end remained a part of the UK, to remain in the EU by extension. On the other, it's only been a couple of hours since the whole thing was announced. People really didn't waste time at all...

nichodemus
offline
nichodemus
14,920 posts
Grand Duke

Nah, I meant Boris.

I saw a story on the news where one of the UKIP MPs was questioned on the dropping pound. His answer? He was thankful that he was paid in Euros. Jeez.

PS Cameron has resigned, but he's set to stay till October.

HahiHa
offline
HahiHa
8,212 posts
Regent

Please people I fixed it!

Sorry, it took me long to write the post and I was ninja'd ^^

I just heard that Gibraltar, which I didn't know was part of the UK, voted by a majority to remain in the UK. Being a point of contention between England and Spain, the latter will naturally push for Gibraltar to reconsider options of sovereignty/co-sovereignty.

Hmm... if we assume an extreme scenario where Scotland, NI and Gibraltar would vote to leave the UK and reenter the EU, not much would be left of the United Kingdom 0.0

I've been informed that the Scottish PM has just asked for a referendum on whether to remain in the UK or not though I haven't been able to verify this just yet.

I had simply heard that Scotland had announced that 'their future lies in the EU', whatever that means.
nichodemus
offline
nichodemus
14,920 posts
Grand Duke

It would be the Divided Kingdom.

But hey, at least Wales is still sticking with England.

@Hahiha Merkel said the door is still left open to Scotland and NI being part of the EU. Not sure how that would work out.

Swarmlord2
offline
Swarmlord2
2,081 posts
Marquis

I've been informed that the Scottish PM has just asked for a referendum on whether to remain in the UK or not though I haven't been able to verify this just yet.

I had simply heard that Scotland had announced that 'their future lies in the EU', whatever that means.

It's not a PM, it's the first minister, [CENSORED] Nicola [CENSORED] Sturgeon and she is the leader of the [CENSORED] SNP who are basically trying to find any excuse to get [CENSORED] independence. They have been doing that since they lost the first referendum.

nichodemus
offline
nichodemus
14,920 posts
Grand Duke

Seems a legitimate issue now though (The whole previous independance debate aside).

Most of Scotland voted for Remain, but now they can't go for it.

HahiHa
offline
HahiHa
8,212 posts
Regent

  • Hours after the referendum results were announced, the question "What is the EU?" was second top on the list of most frequently googled questions on the EU in the UK: link
  • Nigel Farage admits one of the Brexit campaign's central argument was 'a mistake': link


... am I far from the reality when I suspect that many Britons must be feeling like waking up after a night of heavy drinking?
Doombreed
offline
Doombreed
7,024 posts
Templar

Not at all. Add in the fact that a Brexit voter was shocked, like nicho said yesterday and I doubt that choice was made responsibly, despite changing everything not just for Britons, but also for most other countries in the EU.

...So yeah, to put my feelings bluntly, some drunk old conservatives accelerated the collapse of the EU, damaging other economies by caring only for themselves, and then waking up to see not only everyone else frantically running around to assess and mitigate all that damage, but also a racist far right (I think) politician being the next probable PM and one of the most outspoken "leavers" admitting that his main argument was flawed. Oh and the fact that the Scottish now have a reason to ask for their independence (especially since the EU officials have declared that "the door to the EU for Scotland and every other part of the UK is still open...).

Funny thing is that during the first Scottish referendum on whether to become independent or not, I was not really getting the reasons why Scotland could possibly want independence and felt like it was a bunch of old conservatives were just admiring the old days ages ago, when Scotland was independent, probably judging from the history books and what they've heard... Of course I was sensible enough not to mention anything to anyone, because I took my lack of knowledge on the matter seriously, but, well, I really feel for them now.

helpo1
offline
helpo1
3,778 posts
King

... am I far from the reality when I suspect that many Britons must be feeling like waking up after a night of heavy drinking?

No - that's why Bregret takes over, so many Leavers say they would vote Remain now and they sign petitions to repeat the referendum and to get Scotland and London independent.

And Leavers claiming they "didn't know what Leave really meant"... oh well. Democracy FTW sometimes.
Doombreed
offline
Doombreed
7,024 posts
Templar

No - that's why Bregret takes over, so many Leavers say they would vote Remain now and they sign petitions to repeat the referendum and to get Scotland and London independent.

Yeah I heard about the "Londipendence" campaign too (This absolutely NOT humorous at all play on these words has to stop, really -_- )

Anyway, I think the campaign has reached about 800,000 supporters by now, which is a lot for just a day and a half after the referendum.

Showing 1-15 of 34

We may use cookies to help customize your experience, including performing analytics and serving ads.
Learn More