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Is it OK to teach evolution in public schools?

Posted Jan 4, '13 at 3:37pm

MageGrayWolf

MageGrayWolf

9,677 posts

Knight

I dispute the quote about science being true whether you believe in it or not because I am aware that in the USSR that the government had its own science to suit the purposes of the state. This brand of Soviet science was not true.

Just tacking the word science to something doesn't mean it was properly conducted. When talking about science we are talking about knowledge or more common the method we use to arrive at that knowledge.

Science
"the intellectual and practical activity encompassing the systematic study of the structure and behavior of the physical and natural world through observation and experiment"- Oxford Dictionary

If you are doing science in some other fashion you're not doing science.

I will give you that a tiger is still a tiger when it's labelled a mouse.

And it's the same for evolution as well, regardless if the majority believes it or not.

I don't like your use of the world "religion" in that sentence; it seems to generalize and make false hypotheses. There might be certain sects of a few religions who tend to disagree with evolution, but nothing is absolute, and certainly nothing is carried over from one religion to another solely because they're religions.

The point being made is that there is pressure being put on teachers not to teach these things. I used the term religion rather than being more specific because I was trying to not sound as if I was singling out any one specifically, as per the request of the OP. "Lets try not point out certain religions."

But it will still be experimental, no?

What do you mean by experimental?

science is often even more hotly debated and disagreed on than history.

that's it's strong point, it thrives on being contested. But the real question is what is the value of that disagreement? What basis does one disagree with a point in science on? Not all of it's equal.

Evolution is fundamental, but not a direct factor like such forces as gravity and inertia; as such, disbelief in it doesn't really make too big an impact on an individual.

Evolution has a number of direct applications to it, beyond that of even immunization as you later pointed out.

Pastafarianism tells that it is not gravity, but the Noodly Appendages of the Flying Spaghetti Monster holding every object back on the surface. Thus disbelief in gravity doesn't really make too big an impact on an individual either (I am eprfectly aware that Pastafarianism isn't to take seriously, but it still illustrates my point).

there really are people who deny gravity, I can't remember what they propose otherwise at the moment.

That's nonsensical. My religion teaches creation by the deity, but I believe in evolution as nowhere does it say contrary to the existence of other other species or similar; in fact, the scientific method is supported, though not in direct words.

if you're going by the Bible then you are going against what it is claiming happened. Though I do actually have a small axe to grind with theistic evolution. That is that we understand the mechanisms involved with the theistic aspect added you're either having to ignore or deny one or more of those mechanisms or having to add a superfluous mechanism.

Besides which, many can be devout followers of sects of religions following the ideology you mentioned, as well as highly scientifically minded. I take it you're familiar with such aspects of religion as deism?

That's not deism. Though yes one can hold a religious view and be a scientist. This is because we tend to compartmentalize and when a view that has been compartmentalized in one way conflicts with a view from the other, we tend to go into cognitive dissonance.

Why is it that one cannot be religious and scientifically oriented as well?

one can, the problem with mixing the two is that the methodologies are at odds with each other.

Anyways, few religions have such mythology, at least directly speaking.

Yes many religions do have creation stories of the world.

"ReliĀ­gion was the race's first (and worst) attempt to make sense of reality." -Christopher Hitchens

One can't take the Bible, for instance, seriously at all times, especially not when it comes to legends; it was written by humans who make mistakes, as is accepted by most sects of Christianity as institutions.

The events in the Bible as it is today are in there because the people who canonized it did take it all seriously.

When Darwin developed his theory, most of the modern world (at least most of England) took it as fact.

Darwin didn't actually develop the theory, he discovered the mechanism by which it works. This discovery catapulted the theory to the forefront. It also allowed it to combat the widely held belief at the time that everything was made as is in it's current form.

 

Posted Jan 4, '13 at 5:31pm

Avorne

Avorne

3,224 posts

Is it OK to teach evolution in public schools?

Of course it is. The education system should be about the teaching of facts and the understanding of fiction. We have a duty of care to the next generation to inform them of what is true, why and how we know that it's true. No dilly-dallying around trying to reconcile well-supported and well-evidenced scientific theories with some outdated religious sensibilities.

 

Posted Jan 4, '13 at 5:44pm

partydevil

partydevil

5,097 posts

I understand that.But the way your saying it is that the school has the right to tell students what to believe. What I am saying is that teachers should teach without saying it is right or wrong.
What kind of country is it if school say what we can and cant believe?

teachers are there to learn those kids something. i math your not getting the option to believe if it's true yes are no. it is a fact. the same whit, english, history, physics, chemistry, geography, economy, IT, techniques, etc.

if we are free to believe if 1+1=2 is true yes or no. then i have no more hope for the country.

 

Posted Jan 5, '13 at 1:40am

pangtongshu

pangtongshu

8,676 posts

So was talking with a friend today during school and apparently one of the Biology teachers at my school doesn't believe in evolution (checking on validity of it). Gotta love the irony

Then there is Paul Broun..

 

Posted Jan 5, '13 at 2:12am

MattBPlaysMinecraft

MattBPlaysMinecraft

10 posts

Well, not ALL Christians believe the Bible is 100% factual in everything... in fact, I was taught it was wrong to assume so.

 

Posted Jan 5, '13 at 3:21am

pangtongshu

pangtongshu

8,676 posts

Well, not ALL Christians believe the Bible is 100% factual in everything

But with that..the Bible is supposed to be the word of god. And if it is the word of god..and you are believing that it is not all correct..then you are believing that what god said was wrong..which is quite the no-no if I'm not mistaken

 

Posted Jan 5, '13 at 3:41am

nichodemus

nichodemus

12,121 posts

Knight

But with that..the Bible is supposed to be the word of god. And if it is the word of god..and you are believing that it is not all correct..then you are believing that what god said was wrong..which is quite the no-no if I'm not mistaken

Theoretically yes, but a Christian's ultimate allegiance (Seems too harsh, yet rather apt word) is to Christ and to God. Yet it's pretty obvious to most that even if He exists most of the versions of the Bibles today aren't written directly by Him, given that,,,,well, there are literally hundreds of versions out there.

 

Posted Jan 5, '13 at 10:43am

danielo

danielo

1,395 posts

My Bible teacher was Atheist. We talked about some part of the bible {its a must subject in Israel, 2 hours a week [its diffrunte from USA studing style, pm for more info]}. So we talked about it, We did compare to other 'creations", like the babylonian one and the greek one. So in seconde thought, it is nice and quite educative.

P.S. Never ever read the Japanise one. Damm, even there mytholigy is pervert...

 

Posted Jan 5, '13 at 1:49pm

SeaTurtle

SeaTurtle

114 posts

I don't have a problem with it, but it's very hypocritical that some people would freak out if the opposite was taught. Both sides being taught is important.

 

Posted Jan 5, '13 at 2:03pm

nichodemus

nichodemus

12,121 posts

Knight

I don't have a problem with it, but it's very hypocritical that some people would freak out if the opposite was taught. Both sides being taught is important.

I doubt so. If the other were taught, then why shouldn't Islam's version, or Judaism's version be taught as well?

 
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