ForumsWEPRIs it OK to teach evolution in public schools?

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shortstopkid123
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shortstopkid123
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Many parents argue about schools teaching evolution. Creationalists do not support or believe in the theory of evolution. It goes against their beliefs. They do not believe it should be taught because it apposes many peoples' beliefs. Do you think that it should be taught?

Notes:
Lets try not point out certain religions. I am saying creationalists for a reason.

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Masterforger
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Masterforger
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It is not a fact and therefor should not be treated as such like it is. Only facts should be taught, the facts of it should be while the guess work shouldn't be or if it is it should be clearly stated that they aren't facts by any means. Since there is much debate on creation Vs evolution being taught then it should be as unbiased as possible teaching that which is fact and making sure that theories are understood to be nothing more than theories.

Theory is, as Kasic said, the highest things go in science. Also, considering how long the theory has survived, I kinda think the scientists are trusting it more then the idea that everything was made in a week. Face it, every biologist uses evolutionary ideas in his/her work, and though certain parts of evolution might be wrong (not much to go wrong, it's basically the idea that animals and other living things can change due to the environment to suit) the basic idea behind it is indefatigable.
MageGrayWolf
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if you dont go in the history and only stay in the present. i dont see why evolution would have a meaning in it.

i mean... to understand what a flower is and how it works. or to know how a human body works, you dont need evolution.


You would be getting a rather incomplete picture by not including it. For instance with your example of how the human body works. Some aspect such as vestigial features aren't going to make much sense without including a reference to evolution.


If you consider your faith weak and fragile as such, maybe you should change it to a stronger one.
To quote a personal friend of mine

[quote] I find your lack of faith, disturbing.
[/quote]

You're friends with Darth Vader?

I think hereditary stuff is taught first year, but that's it for sex stuff.


That s for a science class. The study of heredity in biology is genetics.

It is not a fact and therefor should not be treated as such like it is.


Yes it is. It's both fact and theory.
Evolution: Fact and Theory

Since there is much debate on creation Vs evolution being taught then it should be as unbiased as possible teaching that which is fact and making sure that theories are understood to be nothing more than theories.


This debate is only on a general public level, there is no real debate in the scientific community.
Creationism is nothing but biased.
A theory is the highest thing you can have in science as it offers explanation for the facts.
partydevil
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partydevil
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You would be getting a rather incomplete picture by not including it. For instance with your example of how the human body works. Some aspect such as vestigial features aren't going to make much sense without including a reference to evolution.


vestigial features have lost all or almost all their functions. they are not really needed when you explain how a body works.
only exception i can think of is the appendix. and our body still works whitout it tho.
TheMostManlyMan
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Ok Kasic you wanted an example so here's an example. There's absolutely no semi-logic reason as to how all the mass got there in the first place, leaving your best assumption that it came in a poof.

HahiHa
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vestigial features have lost all or almost all their functions. they are not really needed when you explain how a body works.

Yes, if your class is orientated very practically. But just imagine anatomy class without telling where the vestigial parts come from. Besides, students ought to ask questions, and the question of the "why" and "where from" is always a pertinent one.

There's absolutely no semi-logic reason as to how all the mass got there in the first place, leaving your best assumption that it came in a poof.

What the heck does that have to do with evolution?
Kasic
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There's absolutely no semi-logic reason as to how all the mass got there in the first place,


And that has absolutely nothing to do with the theory of evolution.

Next misconception please.
TheMostManlyMan
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Never mind, that is often interchanged with the Big Bang theory.

Kasic
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Kasic
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Never mind, that is often interchanged with the Big Bang theory.


Only by people who aren't well versed in what they are talking about.

Go on though, I'm quite curious what parts of evolution are "guesswork" and should not be taught as fact.
partydevil
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partydevil
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Yes, if your class is orientated very practically.

1st year, so, yes i think so.

Besides, students ought to ask questions, and the question of the "why" and "where from" is always a pertinent one.

we had to be silent during class.
this sure is a improvement in the system on some fields.
TheMostManlyMan
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No, for this particular thread I think that's enough. After all that is one of he first things that should have been answered before the theory went any further. I'll be putting the rest in the theism and atheism thread.

Kasic
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Kasic
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No, for this particular thread I think that's enough


So what you're saying is, despite that you've given no examples of "guesswork" in evolution, that's enough?

After all that is one of he first things that should have been answered before the theory went any further.


Where everything came from is a separate matter (haha) than how stuff works.

If you have the ingredients for a cake but don't know where the ingredients came from, you can still make said cake.

If you find an ancient city and don't know who built it, that doesn't change the fact that there is a city and glimpses of their lives can be seen from what's in the houses, if they were buried, etc.

Origins are separate from functioning.
HahiHa
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HahiHa
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Ya. We don't need to know where matter came from; we can look at the existing life (a basis that is sure enough existing, and don't come up with all that philosophy stuff now, mkey?) and develop the theory of evolution to explain how that life behaves over time. Combined with paleontology we can even retrace bits of its history. How life even started is another matter not involved in the theory of evolution, but in that of abiogenesis. And the thing with the matter is a problem of the theory of the big bang. All three theories can be studied and taught independently of each other.

MageGrayWolf
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vestigial features have lost all or almost all their functions. they are not really needed when you explain how a body works.


So you don't think that how the body is put together is an important first step in how it works? to leave out vestigial features when explain the human body paints an incomplete picture, even when talking about it on a basic level.

we had to be silent during class.
this sure is a improvement in the system on some fields.


If you're in a class that doesn't set aside some time to allow for questions, that doesn't sound like a very good class.

There's absolutely no semi-logic reason as to how all the mass got there in the first place, leaving your best assumption that it came in a poof.


As mentioned this doesn't really have anything to do with evolution but, no that isn't our best guess. There are a number of hypotheses dealing with the matter/energy of our universe.

After all that is one of he first things that should have been answered before the theory went any further.


the theory doesn't start at this point. It starts at the point of life existing and deals with how it diversified.

The way your framing this is a bit like saying before you answer how a car works we should first know where the materials for the car come from. While it is a good question to ask it's not required for what is being dealt with.
partydevil
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partydevil
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to sum it up:
big bang - start of the universe.
abiogenesis - start of life.
evolution - how that life behaves over time.

partydevil
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partydevil
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So you don't think that how the body is put together is an important first step in how it works?

it's not what i think but what i remember.

If you're in a class that doesn't set aside some time to allow for questions, that doesn't sound like a very good class.

it's just the way things go.
we had homework class every day for a hour where we could ask questions.
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