Forums

ForumsWorld Events, Politics, Religion, Etc.

Biblical Morality (or Religious Morality)

Posted Jan 11, '13 at 6:00pm

Bladerunner679

Bladerunner679

1,343 posts

You're free to decide if you want to follow His laws or not.

in layman's terms, the person that god created is free to do exactly what god wants him to do, regardless of the person's feelings about it. the concept of predestination, and free will cannot exist, and biblical free will is a joke. sounds to me like god consider's us playthings.

-Blade

 

Posted Jan 12, '13 at 10:42pm

BigP08

BigP08

1,431 posts

I wanted to entertain a different approach now, and this one is universal for many religions. In general, religions tend to say that depending on whether or not you believe their claims, there are going to be serious ramifications in the afterlife, sometimes eternal ramifications. Regardless of whether or not you believe that there's absolute proof for your belief and we atheists just are ignoring, any all powerful and omniscient god should have known that we would have this issue and should have known how to make its existence clear to us. So my question is, should an all powerful god exist, be aware that there is confusion about its existence, know that if we don't believe in it that something bad is going to happen to us after we die, and choose not to make things clear to us, is that moral? I submit that it would not be moral. I can think of no justification that would make a god judge me for not knowing it exists when the god could not possibly have had to go through something anything remotely like a "leap of faith without evidence" scenario.

I tried to keep from picking a religion for a reason. If your beliefs fall under this description of a god, I would be interested in your response, regardless of religion.

 

Posted Jan 13, '13 at 3:39am

EmperorPalpatine

EmperorPalpatine

4,970 posts

In the bible it said, the seconde commanment if i belive,

Often 3rd after 'no other gods' and 'no carved/graven images'.

"dont speak the name of the lord for vain / for no reason". And yet juhova withnesess say it every time they identify themselves. You dont say/write juhuva by this biblical law.

Paraphrasing the appendix of the New World Tranlsation of the Holy Scriptures, {"The divine name (Jehovah/YHWH) is a causative form of the Hebrew verb "ha-wah" meaning "to become". The tetragrammation (four-letter word) means "He Causes to Become". The tetragrammation appears in both the original Hebrew text and in the translated Greek septuagint. Thus, regardless of which version he read, when Jesus read Isaiah 61:1-2 aloud [Luke 4:14-32], he would've pronounced the word for the divine name. To back this up, Jesus stated that he had declared His name [John 17:6,26]."}

 

Posted Jan 13, '13 at 9:09am

Masterforger

Masterforger

1,633 posts

If God is all-forgiving, why is there hell?

If God created man is his own image, why are we so violent?

We also have Epicurus:
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God

Most religion's deities have been, seemingly, corrupt. How surprising.

 

Posted Jan 13, '13 at 4:16pm

handlerfan

handlerfan

192 posts

I am interested in karma by which I mean that if I behave in the right way I expect that I will reduce the suffering in my life and move towards a state of bliss.
Why should I expect to live in a good world if I am a bad man?

 

Posted Jan 13, '13 at 4:41pm

HahiHa

HahiHa

4,934 posts

Knight

I am interested in karma by which I mean that if I behave in the right way I expect that I will reduce the suffering in my life and move towards a state of bliss.
Why should I expect to live in a good world if I am a bad man?

Ah, the expectation that our acts are judged objectively by some higher being or some kind of balance, in an attempt to justify good acts. This is projecting human morals on a world that doesn't follow nor know morals.

It also raises another issue (all of the following being purely hypothetic): even assuming we were created neutral (this being the only "fair" assumption in aspect of judgement), all our following acts are still influenced by "good" or "bad" morals that we've been taught. So is it fair to reward some and punish others, over a mere choice that we couldn't possibly comprehend yet were forced to make?

 

Posted Jan 13, '13 at 5:08pm

EmperorPalpatine

EmperorPalpatine

4,970 posts

Why should I expect to live in a good world if I am a bad man?

By what measure are 'good' and 'bad' being judged?

 

Posted Jan 14, '13 at 1:21am

Masterforger

Masterforger

1,633 posts

By what measure are 'good' and 'bad' being judged?

Good meaning peaceful and prosperous, a bad person meaning a thief, a murderer, etc. Anything bad by either religious or moral standing.

 

Posted Jan 14, '13 at 2:11am

EmperorPalpatine

EmperorPalpatine

4,970 posts

Anything bad by either religious or moral standing.

There are a lot of things that are considered 'bad', even in a single religion, let alone any (ex: some follow the 600+ laws in the bible and breaking any of them is considered sin/bad). Then there's motives and such (ex: stealing out of desperation or working on the Sabbath to feed a family).

 

Posted Jan 14, '13 at 2:38am

Masterforger

Masterforger

1,633 posts

I am not one of the folk who wrote the bible,but I do know what is right and wrong from my own standing, i.e. murder being a no-no, stealing for survival being justifiable.

 
Reply to Biblical Morality (or Religious Morality)

You must be logged in to post a reply!