Forums

ForumsWorld Events, Politics, Religion, Etc.

Is it OK to teach evolution in public schools?

Posted Jan 8, '13 at 2:31pm

TheMostManlyMan

TheMostManlyMan

3,542 posts

No, for this particular thread I think that's enough. After all that is one of he first things that should have been answered before the theory went any further. I'll be putting the rest in the theism and atheism thread.

 

Posted Jan 8, '13 at 3:21pm

Kasic

Kasic

5,591 posts

No, for this particular thread I think that's enough

So what you're saying is, despite that you've given no examples of "guesswork" in evolution, that's enough?

After all that is one of he first things that should have been answered before the theory went any further.

Where everything came from is a separate matter (haha) than how stuff works.

If you have the ingredients for a cake but don't know where the ingredients came from, you can still make said cake.

If you find an ancient city and don't know who built it, that doesn't change the fact that there is a city and glimpses of their lives can be seen from what's in the houses, if they were buried, etc.

Origins are separate from functioning.

 

Posted Jan 8, '13 at 5:35pm

HahiHa

HahiHa

5,082 posts

Knight

Ya. We don't need to know where matter came from; we can look at the existing life (a basis that is sure enough existing, and don't come up with all that philosophy stuff now, mkey?) and develop the theory of evolution to explain how that life behaves over time. Combined with paleontology we can even retrace bits of its history. How life even started is another matter not involved in the theory of evolution, but in that of abiogenesis. And the thing with the matter is a problem of the theory of the big bang. All three theories can be studied and taught independently of each other.

 

Posted Jan 8, '13 at 7:55pm

MageGrayWolf

MageGrayWolf

9,691 posts

Knight

vestigial features have lost all or almost all their functions. they are not really needed when you explain how a body works.

So you don't think that how the body is put together is an important first step in how it works? to leave out vestigial features when explain the human body paints an incomplete picture, even when talking about it on a basic level.

we had to be silent during class.
this sure is a improvement in the system on some fields.

If you're in a class that doesn't set aside some time to allow for questions, that doesn't sound like a very good class.

There's absolutely no semi-logic reason as to how all the mass got there in the first place, leaving your best assumption that it came in a poof.

As mentioned this doesn't really have anything to do with evolution but, no that isn't our best guess. There are a number of hypotheses dealing with the matter/energy of our universe.

After all that is one of he first things that should have been answered before the theory went any further.

the theory doesn't start at this point. It starts at the point of life existing and deals with how it diversified.

The way your framing this is a bit like saying before you answer how a car works we should first know where the materials for the car come from. While it is a good question to ask it's not required for what is being dealt with.

 

Posted Jan 8, '13 at 8:00pm

partydevil

partydevil

5,109 posts

to sum it up:
big bang - start of the universe.
abiogenesis - start of life.
evolution - how that life behaves over time.

 

Posted Jan 8, '13 at 8:06pm

partydevil

partydevil

5,109 posts

So you don't think that how the body is put together is an important first step in how it works?

it's not what i think but what i remember.

If you're in a class that doesn't set aside some time to allow for questions, that doesn't sound like a very good class.

it's just the way things go.
we had homework class every day for a hour where we could ask questions.

 

Posted Jan 8, '13 at 8:25pm

thugtastic

thugtastic

164 posts

I think it is the most logical perspective on the last few million years and I am a Roman Catholic which is a religion that many people accuse of Creationism.
Of course I think it is proper to teach this in public schools.

 

Posted Jan 8, '13 at 8:37pm

partydevil

partydevil

5,109 posts

which is a religion that many people accuse of Creationism.

accuse?¿?
your saying you do not believe god is the creator of everything, and your catholic?

you know, god made the earth, the sun, life and light. and whatever more is in that list. ending whit a day of rest.
or what side vision of roman catholic do you have? =S

 

Posted Jan 8, '13 at 8:40pm

Kasic

Kasic

5,591 posts

your saying you do not believe god is the creator of everything, and your catholic?

Usually when people say Creationists they're referring to those who think the world is ~7000 years old.

Even though technically almost every religion has a creation story.

 

Posted Jan 8, '13 at 8:47pm

partydevil

partydevil

5,109 posts

Usually when people say Creationists they're referring to those who think the world is ~7000 years old.

oh, ive always used it as a word for "religious people"

 
Reply to Is it OK to teach evolution in public schools?

You must be logged in to post a reply!