ForumsWEPRWhat is God's Name?

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apldeap123
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apldeap123
1,713 posts
Farmer

Most people believe that Jesus is God's son, and that God sent His son down to save us from our sins. However, in some Bibles, the name of God is either mentioned as God or Lord. But those are not names, those are titles. So what is God's name?

-Please show evidence supporting your answer

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liquidvenom13
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liquidvenom13
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Shepherd

God is called several things. You could call them names I guess, but his name is God. Simple as that. A title would be god with a little 'g' because they would be false gods, not the one true God.

The names listed below were taken directly from the bible. Just organized in an easy to see format

God was called 100+ different names. Here is a picture of them:
http://drtimwhite.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/The-Names-of-God.jpg

EmperorPalpatine
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EmperorPalpatine
9,450 posts
Jester

God was called 100+ different names. Here is a picture of them.

Nearly all of those are titles. Some are just words. "Person", "Nations".

Most people

* About 1/3 of people.

Vocalizations of the tetragrammation transliterated as YHWH seem to be common (Yahweh, Jehovah, Yehowah...). Mormons chose Elohim, Muslims chose Allah. Jews chose El or Elohim depending on the context. Based on what I've researched about the origins of Judaism, it branched from the polytheistic Canaanite religion whose creator God was called El.

Some links:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_Judaism
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Semitic_religion
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetragrammaton
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_of_God_in_Judaism
09philj
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09philj
2,826 posts
Jester

God is a concept I don't believe in, so "God" seems a short simple word to use. It's all subjective really.

Jacen96
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Jacen96
3,099 posts
Bard

Don't know, but there are about nine billion of them.

~~~Darth Caedus

apldeap123
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apldeap123
1,713 posts
Farmer

@liquidvenom13

In the picture that you posted, one of the names of God is listed as Christ. But is not the Christ the Son of God?

EmperorPalpatine
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EmperorPalpatine
9,450 posts
Jester

In the picture that you posted, one of the names of God is listed as Christ. But is not the Christ the Son of God?

To a Trinitarian, the Son is also God.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b3/Shield-Trinity-Scutum-Fidei-English.svg
apldeap123
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apldeap123
1,713 posts
Farmer

@EmperorPalpatine

So let me get this straight (you are an atheist, right), according to Catholics, God, Jesus Christ, and the Holy Spirit are entirely different beings, but they are the same person as God Almighty? Perhaps you can explain how that works.

EmperorPalpatine
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EmperorPalpatine
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Jester

(you are an atheist, right),

By most definitions, yes.

according to Catholics, God, Jesus Christ, and the Holy Spirit are entirely different beings, but they are the same person as God Almighty? Perhaps you can explain how that works.

They're considered as "God the Father", "God the Son", and "God the Holy Spirit". Distinctive, but of the same Godhead/essence (eternal, equally all powerful).
I guess the closest analogy would be the 3 branches of the US Federal Government if everyone in office agreed on everything, but that's closer to the Mormon's nontrinitarian interpretation.
liquidvenom13
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liquidvenom13
82 posts
Shepherd

@apldeap123

In the picture that you posted, one of the names of God is listed as Christ. But is not the Christ the Son of God?


Christ is the name, he was called Christ, the Son of God. Which is more of a reference. In the bible they do a lot of [insert name here], son of [Abraham]
Kind of like their way of doing genealogy? It shows the persons predecessors. Does that make sense?
EmperorPalpatine
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EmperorPalpatine
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Jester

Christ is the name, he was called Christ,

Christ is a title, meaning "anointed". It's derived from the Greek translation of "messiah".
xeano321
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xeano321
3,157 posts
Farmer

Christ is a title, meaning "anointed". It's derived from the Greek translation of "messiah".


Correct. Christ was the prophesied messiah from the old testament. He was referred to in a couple places as "the Christ", so it checks out.
Terry_Logic
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Terry_Logic
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Jester

God was called 100+ different names. Here is a picture of them:


I want to know what happened to the guy who called him "Sharon"
231terminator
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231terminator
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Nomad

i just say hes Jesus really, for the record i am baptist christian. i also call him lord or god, pretty much those 3 mean the same

Moegreche
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Moegreche
3,816 posts
Duke

@231terminator - Your method of referring to God is a logical inconsistency. Lord, God, and Jesus do not mean the same thing. From a sense and reference point of view, they refer quite clearly to different entities. As a Baptist Christian, you are also a Trinitarian.

This commitment, by itself, is a logical inconsistency. And by that I don't mean that it just doesn't make sense. I mean that there is an internal contradiction in this notion. In other words, acceptance of this doctrine is epistemically irrational.

Just to make it clear, as a matter of fact, "those 3" don't mean the same thing. Again, this depends on your notion of meaning. But I'm not aware of an analysis of meaning that can get you the result you want.

In Catholicism, this worry is known as a divine mystery of faith. So at least they recognise the inconsistency.

I'm not suggesting that you revise your beliefs. We are all - each and every one of us - guilty of holding inconsistent beliefs. I'm just suggesting that this inconsistency is something you consider.

apldeap123
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apldeap123
1,713 posts
Farmer

i also call him lord or god, pretty much those 3 mean the same

'Lord' and 'God' are titles, whereas Jesus is a specific being.

To a Trinitarian, the Son is also God.

To a Trinitarian, and also to many Catholics, God the Father, God the Son, and the Holy Spirit are three beings, yet come together to form one Being, e.g, God.

However, note what it said in Luke 22:42, KJV:

Saying, Father, if thou be willing, remove this cup from me: nevertheless not my will, but thine, be done.

Here, Jesus is praying to his Father. But according to the Trinity doctrine, Jesus would be talking to himself. Why would he have the need to ask his father for permission to do something if he is his father?

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