ForumsWEPRHow do you deal with death?

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Sssssnnaakke
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Sssssnnaakke
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How do you deal with the knowledge that your experience on Earth will end?

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Jumpper
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Jumpper
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Peasant

there was another thread about death heres a link to what I think

Jumpper
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Jumpper
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Peasant

sorry wrong link this is the quickest link

sourwhatup2
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sourwhatup2
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Scribe

Well, first of all title and OP question are kinda different so I'll answer both.

How do you deal with the knowledge that your experience on Earth will end?

In my honest opinion I do not care, everyone dies at some point and if I could live forever I wouldn't really want that, the though that living on this planet for over even 100 years kinda makes me cringe. I know this isn't a very detailed statement, but meh.

How do you deal with death?

Now this is completely different. Basically this is saying how do you deal with death around you. For me after 18 years I have experienced some losses over my lifetime. And I have learned to accept death, people die, wether it be natural, murder, etc. There is a reason we are humans, animals, living organisms, that at one point or another die.

The first person I ever personally knew and died was my uncle on my mother's side, and of course I was suprised, and not happy about it, but I dealt with it, just like the rest of the crap that I've gone through. So yeah. Those are my opinions on this whole thing.
ProfessorOak
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ProfessorOak
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Peasant

Death to me is really interesting. Not in an evil way, I just find it fascinating. In the center of your brain, there is something called your pineal gland. Every night while you sleep, Dimethyltryptamine is released while you dream. It is also believed that this same chemical is heavily released all throughout the brain when you have near death or death experiences. Also keep in mind this is found in all mammals. Every single night our mind goes into another dimension, separated from our bodies and this physical world. And when we die the same thing might be happening. That's something to think about.

HahiHa
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HahiHa
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Grand Duke

Death to me is really interesting. Not in an evil way, I just find it fascinating. In the center of your brain, there is something called your pineal gland. Every night while you sleep, Dimethyltryptamine is released while you dream. It is also believed that this same chemical is heavily released all throughout the brain when you have near death or death experiences. Also keep in mind this is found in all mammals. Every single night our mind goes into another dimension, separated from our bodies and this physical world. And when we die the same thing might be happening. That's something to think about.

You are assuming that 1. there are different dimensions, 2. our mind can separate from our body, 3. our mind can travel dimensions, 4. dreaming equals temporary death. So many baseless assumptions make it highly unlikely. Dreams are just our brain processing data and being active while the body is on economy mode; no transdimensional stuff needed to explain. Besides, in sleep, as mentioned, the brain is still active, while in death it is not; shouldn't the brain be not active during dreaming as well, if what you say would be true?

Do you have any idea what physiological function/effect that dimethyltryptramine has? It might be related to body process regulations, if what you say is true.
deathbewithyou
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deathbewithyou
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ah death... a touchy word at times but I named my nickname after it to not forget death's importance.

I've experienced a lot of death in my life and I have made many mistakes in dealing with it. What I decided to do was to completly forget the person... in doing so I had made my life miserable. Of course it is quite understandable for a person to choose to forget his loved ones, but doing so can cause him to forget even more. Names, faces, places and things all of those I had forgotten. I wanted to get away from it all and so I did... all of it.

I learned that it is important to remember the good times I had with the ones I loved rather than forget them. Of course I am sure many have learned this lesson, but it is important to remember.
Always remeber who you loved and lost lest you be trapped in a dark pit. Alone with no one to reach you because you don't call for help and even when help comes, you don't reach out your hand to be pulled out of the darkness.

ProfessorOak
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ProfessorOak
996 posts
Peasant

2. our mind can separate from our body


You're assuming our mind is one with our body. There are many beliefs that they are two separate things.

4. dreaming equals temporary death


Actually, I was thinking the complete opposite. I was poking at the thought that death is a permanent dream.

Do you have any idea what physiological function/effect that dimethyltryptramine has?


Actually, nobody has a concerte idea why Dimethyltryptramine is found in all of us (I also forget to mention the fact that it is found in many many plants as well, but obviously not for dreaming), but there are handfuls of theories. Dimethyltryptramine (or for short, DMT) can also be made and taken as a psychedelic drug. In fact it's one of the most powerful (and not to mention illegal) as we know it. When in the user's system, they experience a total loss of connection to reality with the encounter of spiritual/alien realms. If you'd like to read more about it, there's a really great book/movie called The Spirit Molecule, I recommend it if you're interested!

Sorry for kind of going off topic, and I am only supplying information to enlighten others, so please don't go off and ban me.
HahiHa
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HahiHa
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Grand Duke

You're assuming our mind is one with our body. There are many beliefs that they are two separate things.

Key word: beliefs. I am not assuming, I am deducing from what we know from neurosciences.

Actually, I was thinking the complete opposite. I was poking at the thought that death is a permanent dream.

Well, that would surely help you deal with death, as does any kind of belief in an afterlife. Which is fine. My own problem with these kinds of beliefs is that it escapes the terminal nature of death and denies life it's unique value.
Strop
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Strop
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Key word: beliefs. I am not assuming, I am deducing from what we know from neurosciences.


Neurosciences have just gotten around to admitting that we're not any closer to localising the so-called source of this phenomenon we call consciousness, and that perhaps we might be asking the question the wrong way. In fact on a tangential note it has also admitted in a recent consensus statement that it can't separate so-called intellect by region either, and therefore we can't declare human intellect to be something distinct based on the existence of certain cortical centres compared to other species. So I'd be interested to know what deductions you're making and based on what.

How do I deal with death? The best thing is to be prepared really. I'm constantly exposed on a near daily basis in my line of work, and my personal beliefs are stark and difficult to swallow: that since there's no observable phenomenon of life after death I assume none exists. I don't insist that others believe the same, of course. What I believe is more important is that where possible, one who is dying and those around them can accept it.
HahiHa
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HahiHa
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Grand Duke

So I'd be interested to know what deductions you're making and based on what.

Is it so hard to imagine that this &quothenomenon we call consciousness", as you put it nicely, is simply resulting from a collective network of our different brain areas? I don't think there has to be a central "mind" area for our brain to work as it does. But I know neurosciences cannot give a real answer to that yet; the deduction I meant is what I said above, deduced from how nervous systems work in general. To lead back on topic, this means death is total and inevitable as our nervous system decays sometime, and the only thing I can do is accept that, and if I'm wrong, the bigger the surprise will be
Max000_Extreme
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Max000_Extreme
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Shepherd

I am only thirteen and I hate living well I am dead so needless to say I also hate death bit less and life

MageGrayWolf
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MageGrayWolf
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Blacksmith

You're assuming our mind is one with our body. There are many beliefs that they are two separate things.


If this duality is true then we are left with questions as to what is happening in situations of brain damage affecting conscious states. Two classic examples are where a person suffers serious brain damage resulting in a completely different personality and conscious state. Another example is with split brain, where the two hemispheres of the brain don't communicate. Each side can express different behavioral patterns, different likes and dislikes and even different personal beliefs.
It would seem based on just these observations we can deduce that the mind is a product of the body as the mind can be altered by altering the body.
Strop
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Strop
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Herald

Is it so hard to imagine that this &quothenomenon we call consciousness", as you put it nicely, is simply resulting from a collective network of our different brain areas?


Not to me, but to others yeah it probably is. The reason I specifically say &quothenomenon we call consciousness" is because I don't think consciousness is a thing in and of itself, hence I agree with you. This of course comes nowhere close to answering questions of "free will", but hey, neuroscience isn't equipped to pinpoint causation, it only describes states, even if they're dynamic ones.

and the only thing I can do is accept that, and if I'm wrong, the bigger the surprise will be


If I wake up in hell, I'll be all like, "****ation."

*rimshot*
fantasy4life
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fantasy4life
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I love how human beings are curious by nature, asking questions that hold no answer...yet.
With my personal experience I've been quite close to death several times, but I haven't really felt anything towards the idea of dying. Neither sadness, nor agony, as some might experience if they see their lives a valuable one, fleeing away in front of their eyes, nor fear, as most feel because of not knowing what lies after death.
I do, however, feel curious. There are a lot of religions that have their own theories of what happens when we die, but non hold any sort of solid ground that could give me some sort of conclusion, as to what to believe. There is a lot of controversy and misleading stories that leads you into circles, not even science holds any rational theories. Not that they have any more shot than religions to give the truth about death, but what is the truth then?

The matter of the fact is, we will never know what happens after death until we actually die. And after that, if we still exist, just a sliver of ourselves, the question is if we will remember anything from our past life, if we're still able to hold rational thoughts.
Buuut I won't be too narrow-minded, since humanity is sometimes pretty incredible, so we might one day discover what happens after we die. At the best, a plausible theory that will please most people.

09philj
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09philj
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It's best to assume you cease to be as this means you try to make the most of your life, because you can't get a second chance.

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